Vintage Mustang Forums banner

21 - 40 of 80 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,846 Posts
Discussion Starter #22
sucks about your quarter! I did mine prior to the repaint but the only real issues were within 3-4" of the wheel opening, it def got lumpy though in the process.
The QP's are fine enough, I was just wondering out loud how much more I could push on the drivers side to get it even with the passenger side without disaster. My drivers side turned out a little lumpy I think because the spot welds are nearer the lip than the passenger side which turned out nice. The original paint must be really soft because I had no cracking.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
17x8 with 245/45/17 x 4, Fenders rolled Perfect fit!

With a little effort I could most likely go larger on rear. However, I like to keep it squared!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,459 Posts
At some point you have to recognize that you are driving an old car and if you want to win, go get a supercharged WRX! I have the same issue, California rust free car. Otherwise do what I do with what I have - go drive the crap out of it and have fun. THere is always someone around my times that I can spar with. The problem with "More" is it's unbounded and never stops. Three link, wider tires, more power, lighter weight it never stops and you will never catch the denttists and lawyers with $$$ IF you want to be really defeated, go run with the Bay Area SAAC SHelby club with the big dollar boys!!!

As for the track, yes its a total adrenaline rush and a lot of fun but it burns hundred dollar bills by the handfulls both in fees and preparation whereas AUtocross is ten dollar bills. Autocross is a completely different sport, its more about a chess game and a fun day socializing with motorheads. Track work is totally about balls and how close to death you are willing to drive. All things being equal, the guy most willing to die wins. Don't get me wrong, I love track days but there is so much at stake, one false move or one bolt that didn't get torqued and you get torqued. Over the years I have witnessed some horendous accidents on the track, they happen regularly enough that four times over teh years I watched some guy right in front of me screw up and I got a front row seat.

Fox body Mustang overcooked turn two at Sears Point, romped right up the hill destroying his front end. Cobra replica overcooked turn one at Thunderhill and was smart enough to abort and romp into the California desert shedding his hood and doors flew open while he roached his oil pan and suspension. Alfa Romeo sedan flipped twice before going end over end exiting the same corner. He drifted into the dirt and broke the golden rule, never try to get back on the track at speed if you are in the dirt, slow down first then turn! Brand new MR2 70 mph to zero in an instant hitting a jersey barier which did not move! Luckily I was really pushing him and decided I couldn't take the Esses at Sears point that fast and backed off just as his drift sideways started. That was an impact that left an impression on me! Watched his airbag deploy - man he hit hard! He was ok but they planted what was left of the car so everyone going out on the track had to drive around his car and look at it.

ONe last thing you can do which is the route I went; talk two VMF Friends to join you who are slower than you, it makes you feel like a better driver ;o)))

Unfortunately @2nd66 is starting to get faster and close the gap. @Huskinhano got some 17" rims so he is likely to be getting faster. THat is why I am moving to Florida soas not to be embarrased...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,846 Posts
Discussion Starter #28
At some point you have to recognize that you are driving an old car and if you want to win, go get a supercharged WRX! I have the same issue, California rust free car. Otherwise do what I do with what I have - go drive the crap out of it and have fun. THere is always someone around my times that I can spar with. The problem with "More" is it's unbounded and never stops. Three link, wider tires, more power, lighter weight it never stops and you will never catch the denttists and lawyers with $$$ IF you want to be really defeated, go run with the Bay Area SAAC SHelby club with the big dollar boys!!!

As for the track, yes its a total adrenaline rush and a lot of fun but it burns hundred dollar bills by the handfulls both in fees and preparation whereas AUtocross is ten dollar bills. Autocross is a completely different sport, its more about a chess game and a fun day socializing with motorheads. Track work is totally about balls and how close to death you are willing to drive. All things being equal, the guy most willing to die wins. Don't get me wrong, I love track days but there is so much at stake, one false move or one bolt that didn't get torqued and you get torqued. Over the years I have witnessed some horendous accidents on the track, they happen regularly enough that four times over teh years I watched some guy right in front of me screw up and I got a front row seat.

Fox body Mustang overcooked turn two at Sears Point, romped right up the hill destroying his front end. Cobra replica overcooked turn one at Thunderhill and was smart enough to abort and romp into the California desert shedding his hood and doors flew open while he roached his oil pan and suspension. Alfa Romeo sedan flipped twice before going end over end exiting the same corner. He drifted into the dirt and broke the golden rule, never try to get back on the track at speed if you are in the dirt, slow down first then turn! Brand new MR2 70 mph to zero in an instant hitting a jersey barier which did not move! Luckily I was really pushing him and decided I couldn't take the Esses at Sears point that fast and backed off just as his drift sideways started. That was an impact that left an impression on me! Watched his airbag deploy - man he hit hard! He was ok but they planted what was left of the car so everyone going out on the track had to drive around his car and look at it.

ONe last thing you can do which is the route I went; talk two VMF Friends to join you who are slower than you, it makes you feel like a better driver ;o)))

Unfortunately @2nd66 is starting to get faster and close the gap. @Huskinhano got some 17" rims so he is likely to be getting faster. THat is why I am moving to Florida soas not to be embarrased...
I read your post today during a 1/2 hour lightning strike delay at Grissom AFB "autocross". Even my best friends that enjoy track days more than autocross say don't track the Mustang or anything you're not afraid to wad up and walk away from. I'm far from the competitive type, but tend to get into it once I'm out there. I got beat today, I think, by a 92 Mustang vert of much rust and many colors. He's an experienced driver according to the locals but he looked like a kid to me. Everybody looks like a kid lately. Given the CamT changes this year, and who knows what the next change will be, I can't get competitive with this car.
When I won CamT last year, cause it was just me who survived, the presenter said at the banquet, "and now the crowd favorite, because everybody loves an old Mustang". Apparently, it's better to look marvelous than be marvelous in an old Mustang.

I appreciate the thought that went into your reply dobrostang.

Going back to Grissom for more tomorrow!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,313 Posts
Track work is totally about balls and how close to death you are willing to drive. All things being equal, the guy most willing to die wins.
Sorry, as a Road Racer I have to disagree with that assessment, it's just not true. Yes, there are serious risks, and you have to overcome your fear, but you make it sound like some form of chicken that's takes bravery not skill. RR takes skill and controlled aggression, you have to be methodical about taking small nibbles towards the edge of grip, especially on high risk corners.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
493 Posts
Sorry, as a Road Racer I have to disagree with that assessment, it's just not true. Yes, there are serious risks, and you have to overcome your fear, but you make it sound like some form of chicken that's takes bravery not skill. RR takes skill and controlled aggression, you have to be methodical about taking small nibbles towards the edge of grip, especially on high risk corners.
Agreed, I feel much safer on the track at tripple digit speeds than in my commute to work. Don't feel the need to conceal carry at the track.
As far as tire room, provided you have a 3 link or can do something with the springs, there is 3 inches of real clearance to be had by a cheap and simple mini tub and a little frame e route. There are companies that have kits to do the job for around $400, but better yet they have great videos on you tube and their efforts are easy to replicate.
 

·
Spammer Hammer
Joined
·
9,531 Posts
Every track event I have attended is a very controlled environment. Now the W2W guys are out there a little bit. However, still very controlled because they are used to each other’s mannerisms for the most part. They generally know what the other guy is going to do before they do it.

Agreed, anything can break at any given moment. Can also happen driving down the interstate. That’s why it’s of supreme importance to check EVERYTHING before an event.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,774 Posts
One last thing you can do which is the route I went; talk two VMF Friends to join you who are slower than you, it makes you feel like a better driver ;o)))
You have just enlightened me as to why @silverblueBP is so complimentary and helpful of @patrickstapler and me in regards to our car builds...

I knew he had a trick up his sleeve! :LOL:

Allen
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,459 Posts
WHenever I rode with someone who was really fast on the track, I could not believe how close to 100% they were. Margins for error are so slim that in my humble estimation, these guys were pack'n. I rode in a 427 vintage racer Cobra test and tuning at Sears Point for the Laguna Seca Vintage Races in two weeks. It was all I could do to keep from screaming uncle. Man that car/guy was FAST - he was hanging it out there to say the least playing tag with a friend of his in another Cobra and did an outside pass it to Turn 1 that blew me away, what a move, but you are very right, they knew each other very well - that you could tell.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,846 Posts
Discussion Starter #34
I'll probably never try a track day for the same reason I never tried cocaine. I can't afford it. $55 today entry fee and petrol to get me to and from an event, truck and trailer. I had fun and am going back for more tomorrow. I'm comfortable in my neighborhood.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,459 Posts
I'll probably never try a track day for the same reason I never tried cocaine. I can't afford it. $55 today entry fee and petrol to get me to and from an event, truck and trailer. I had fun and am going back for more tomorrow. I'm comfortable in my neighborhood.
You should put it on your bucket list. It is a total adrenaline rush and you will love lighting up your car. Being able to trailer it home is a nice feature. I always drive there and back so its a little extra stress but so far she has been great. Since you know how to negotiate corners it is a kick in the Butt. I also cannot afford to lose my Mustang either, I will never get another. So I push it till I feel I'm good and getting what I need e.g. I hair out at 115 or so on straights, by 120 without ground effects my front end starts floating and my Spidie senses go off.

If things settle out financially, don't completely write off what are some of the highlights of my Mustang experience. Here is an excerpt of a short story I wrote entitled; "A page out of racing history" about my first track day.

... By the third lap I am feeling my oats and starting to push it. I see that I am gaining on the pack as I fly flat-out down the long straight into turn 1; a high speed 90 degree turn that is slightly downhill coming in and slightly uphill going out resulting in a compressing sensation at the apex around mid-point of the corner. Approaching Turn 1, the Mustang, quite literally, is going as fast as it possibly can - as notably am I.

Imagine Dear Reader approaching Turn 1 at top speed; just before the entrance or point where you turn-in throwing the car into the dance, you play a game of chicken with yourself waiting till the last micro-second then mash the brakes with a vengeance eventually turning into the well banked turn. With eyes fixed on the apex of Turn 1, you slide off the scorching hot brakes and strategically time a smooth transition of the car’s frame into a wide-open-throttle launch of the seat of your pants into the apex of the corner where compression gives tires “super-human” grip. Your baby throbs in a maximum-torque-vector aimed to take you to the exit of the corner as fast as your tires can possibly hold on.

It’s a recipe for living the most fun you could ever dream driving could be. Total G-Force; like the weight of a passionate lover pressing your body while all your senses are stimulated with power in complete oneness with the traction of each and every tire. Now throw in your favorite music: the truly original-sound-track of the best your “race-car” has ever sounded in full spectrum sense-surround that would drop Thomas Dolby to his knees. All seasoned with just a hint of if-you-blow-it-you-could-die reality giving the experience a nice finish.

Exploding past the exit of the corner, the last car is now in my field of view and I recognize I am clearly not the slowest car on the track. Through Turns 2, 3 and 4, I continue to push-it successfully gaining on the pack, as the scent of prey mixes with hot tires, gas and exhaust. Life is good, really good!!!


A feeling you will relive over and over in your mind. Go there if you can someday - trust me... take video!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,774 Posts
You should put it on your bucket list. It is a total adrenaline rush and you will love lighting up your car. Being able to trailer it home is a nice feature. I always drive there and back so its a little extra stress but so far she has been great. Since you know how to negotiate corners it is a kick in the Butt. I also cannot afford to lose my Mustang either, I will never get another. So I push it till I feel I'm good and getting what I need e.g. I hair out at 115 or so on straights, by 120 without ground effects my front end starts floating and my Spidie senses go off.

If things settle out financially, don't completely write off what are some of the highlights of my Mustang experience. Here is an excerpt of a short story I wrote entitled; "A page out of racing history" about my first track day.

... By the third lap I am feeling my oats and starting to push it. I see that I am gaining on the pack as I fly flat-out down the long straight into turn 1; a high speed 90 degree turn that is slightly downhill coming in and slightly uphill going out resulting in a compressing sensation at the apex around mid-point of the corner. Approaching Turn 1, the Mustang, quite literally, is going as fast as it possibly can - as notably am I.

Imagine Dear Reader approaching Turn 1 at top speed; just before the entrance or point where you turn-in throwing the car into the dance, you play a game of chicken with yourself waiting till the last micro-second then mash the brakes with a vengeance eventually turning into the well banked turn. With eyes fixed on the apex of Turn 1, you slide off the scorching hot brakes and strategically time a smooth transition of the car’s frame into a wide-open-throttle launch of the seat of your pants into the apex of the corner where compression gives tires “super-human” grip. Your baby throbs in a maximum-torque-vector aimed to take you to the exit of the corner as fast as your tires can possibly hold on.

It’s a recipe for living the most fun you could ever dream driving could be. Total G-Force; like the weight of a passionate lover pressing your body while all your senses are stimulated with power in complete oneness with the traction of each and every tire. Now throw in your favorite music: the truly original-sound-track of the best your “race-car” has ever sounded in full spectrum sense-surround that would drop Thomas Dolby to his knees. All seasoned with just a hint of if-you-blow-it-you-could-die reality giving the experience a nice finish.

Exploding past the exit of the corner, the last car is now in my field of view and I recognize I am clearly not the slowest car on the track. Through Turns 2, 3 and 4, I continue to push-it successfully gaining on the pack, as the scent of prey mixes with hot tires, gas and exhaust. Life is good, really good!!!


A feeling you will relive over and over in your mind. Go there if you can someday - trust me... take video!!!
"Hallet Motor Racing Circuit.
When you can drive a car, wound out, pushing who knows how many rpms and how fast we're going, straight at a corner, with a car in front of you, and down shift at the last second all in unison with absolutely standing on the brake only to get within 6" of the car in front of you, all the while having the mindset to know that you have to make this hard left/right and then slam the throttle to pull side by side with the guy that was in front of you, either passing him or getting beat by a fender into the next corner and doing it all again for a solid 15 minutes without as much as even scaring your passenger (me) after the first lap because you made him (me) feel so comfortable in the car that I truly, knew I was in good hands, you sir, are, in a word, incredible. Dan (the owner and driver) told me he could listen to my accent all day, well I could ride with him in his race car all day. IMPRESSED!!
Was that a run on sentence, I'm still exhilarated!! Thanks to Mark Sellers for making it happen!!"

My little write up the evening after getting to hop in and ride. I never will forget it!

Allen

759628
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
832 Posts
I spent a lot of time in the infamous 70s driving both SCCA (Triumphs and Lotuses in F & G Production) and autocrosses (in just about everything). The two events are worlds apart. I feel that autocrossing is actually harder. On a race track you get time to “practice,” learn the course, where the best line might be, etc. But an autocross is a one, two & done event. You must really know your car and be able to read a line without benefit of practice. Of course, the adrenaline rush of road racing fender to fender is beyond explaining. Or, as my driving school instructor said, sometimes it’s better than sex.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,313 Posts
I raced SCCA Formula Ford for Years and I agree, I find some Autocross courses very difficult. You don't get repetitive lap practice, and I tend to have trouble memorizing long courses in only a few runs (Pocono). It's easy to overdrive throwing the car all over the place feeling fast, but going slow !
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,846 Posts
Discussion Starter #39 (Edited)
I was bouncing off the rev limiter 4 times every run today at Grissom AFB. Thats 6400 RPM at 72 MPH heading toward government fencing in one corner and a filled in anti-aircraft battery, the "hill" approaching another. A perfect super fast high HP course for the old Mustang! I'm good!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,846 Posts
Discussion Starter #40
So, this is my friend and mechanic Nick last year. I don't want to do that!

759703
 
21 - 40 of 80 Posts
Top