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Discussion Starter #1
I need to install new clamps on my battery cables they look like crap and are chewed up. I saw somewhere on TV about a professional style crimping tool for the lead clamps. Can someone provide info or a link if you know what I’m talking about. Thanks.
 

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I buy a lead socket, fill it with solder, heat it with a torch and push the cable in.

Make sure the cable is clean, no corrosion, dry and splay the wires as far as you can and still fit them inside the socket.

It will last as long as the cable lasts.
 
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One thing to consider with a solder lug is to crimp also, otherwise if you have a situation where you have a high amp draw like a long hard start or small cables the solder only connection can potentially loosen from heat causing a conduction issue.
 

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You'd probably be better off just buying new cables. I don't think Lead terminals are suitable for crimping, that's for Copper lugs ?
 

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It appears the OP's original question concerned the lead clamp on the battery end of the cable, not the copper lug on the other end.
 

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And your reason for not buying a whole new cable is ————
 

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Discussion Starter #8
  1. Well because it’s about 15’ long to the trunk. I think I’ll get one of the quick solder copper style lugs. Thanks for the replies!
 

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  1. Well because it’s about 15’ long to the trunk. I think I’ll get one of the quick solder copper style lugs. Thanks for the replies!
Well yeah, that does make sense!
 

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I used a solder connection as well.
I put the lug in a vise, heated it with a propane torch, partially filled the cavity with resin core solder and plunged the cable into the molten solder.
 
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I used a solder connection as well.
I put the lug in a vise, heated it with a propane torch, partially filled the cavity with resin core solder and plunged the cable into the molten solder.
That's exactly how I install lugs on battery cables. I keep the heat on the lug when I stick the cable in until I can feel the cable getting hot because I want to make sure the cable wires get good and hot and the solder gets a good bond. I don't want any "cold solder" joints.
 

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I would not just use solder. I would crimp as well. I just don't trust it.
 

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Ive soldered battery terminals that went for years with zero issues.

In the end, make your own decision and follow your own path.

Thats my policy, I have no one to thank or blame except myself.
 

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I would not just use solder. I would crimp as well. I just don't trust it.
Some guys that wear suspenders wear a belt as well, can’t be to safe eh.
 
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We build battery cables and such for equipment that people's lives are truly dependent on in adverse conditions to the IPC standards. The cables are always crimped and the exposed ends are lightly fluxed and then tinned with solder to prevent corrosion since that area is exposed. At no time is the solder allowed to flow fully inside the crimp by the standards nor should the stripped cable ever be tinned before crimping.
 

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We build battery cables and such for equipment that people's lives are truly dependent on in adverse conditions to the IPC standards. The cables are always crimped and the exposed ends are lightly fluxed and then tinned with solder to prevent corrosion since that area is exposed. At no time is the solder allowed to flow fully inside the crimp by the standards nor should the stripped cable ever be tinned before crimping.
Thanks for that. I was wondering how to seal the exposed end of "open" lugs, I was using adhesive heat shrink, but it never really seals the ends well. So I assume that means crimping the wire "dry", since you can't tin with Kopr-Shield or similar in the lug ?
 

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We crimp "dry" but I see no reason that the product mentioned would be detrimental as it prevents corrosion. Not sure if the end could still be soldered afterwards.

The solder should also extend onto the connector. The problem when soldering the connector fully onto a lug is that Flux is corrosive and needs to be removed (also an IPC standard.)

Our crimps are done in either square or in a hex pattern with an appropriate die. The best crimper is an air actuated hydraulic device which crushes the connector and copper so there are no voids for moisture to enter. At home I use a hex pattern T&D manual electrician's crimper.

By the way, at work we also use heat shrink over the soldered exposed ends (after cleaning the flux off with alcohol and a brush.)
 

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Our crimps are done in either square or in a hex pattern with an appropriate die. The best crimper is an air actuated hydraulic device which crushes the connector and copper so there are no voids for moisture to enter. At home I use a hex pattern T&D manual electrician's crimper.
T&B manual crimper ? I'm using a Chinese hydraulic crimper, not great, but it seems to do the job. "real" crimpers just cost too much, even the large manual crimpers are $300+ new.
 

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Yes, T&B. I was once was an industrial electrician and it (plus the assortment of dies and terminals) was given to me when the factory closed and moved to China. Never priced it but I'm sure you are pretty darn close.
 
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