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What is the correct/best way to tow a classic stang?
On a flatbed or the standard lift the rear tires.
I'm asking this because my car was towed twice this week.

On a flatbed, the guy placed the tow hooks on the lower
control arm and pulled the car forward on the flatbed.
Did he damage anything by doing this?

Standard lift the rear tires. The tow hooks were placed
around the rear of the leaf-spring for safety.
Also since the car doesn't have steering lock, the guy
used two straps on the steering wheel to keep it in place.

BTW, I installed original transport hooks on the rear of my car.
Are there transport hooks for the front??
 

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I've always had my Mustang towed on a flatbed. I prefer it off the ground while being towed.
I don't think the control arm is the best place to pull it up, but it should be ok.
 

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What is the correct/best way to tow a classic stang?

Personally, for an emergency/breakdown, I'd prefer a roll-back..

On the hook, with an auto trans, I prefer front down...

Cabling shouldn't hurt the control arms as long as the cable was Y'd and was pulling both sides equally...I wouldn't like them pulling only on one arm though...

I pull the race car onto the trailer from a little bracket at the center of the front crossmember...take a look at this picture and look directly under the center of the radiator. It's amazing how much stress a steel bracket can take...I actually lift the front end of the car with that with my bridge crane (about 3 ft up in the air) when placing the car on its shop cradle...works fine.
Point is those control arms can take a lot of stress without deforming. There are a couple of places on the front subframe to pull but the rollback guy may not have had hooks to fit. I likely would've used the transport hooks at the rear for tie-down points but for a safety hook on a rear lift I really don't know.

AFAIK, there aren't brackets for the front...my D-coder does still have the rear brackets but the front is barren...
 

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There aren't any brackets in the front, but there is a hole in each frame rail that special tie-down hooks go into. That's also how the rear brackets were used. I used to tie down my coupe using the hooks, but now I use over-the-wheel straps. They're harder to put on but I prefer the car riding smoothly on its own suspension in the trailer rather than it taking the hard shocks it was getting with the frame tie-down method.
 
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I agree with "Laurie_S" about strapping down the front tires. I do this on my trailer. Also, I use axle straps on the rear and cross the straps.

I looked at "camachinist" pics. It's a nice car, but it doesn't have the stock chassis so I wouldn't recommend welding a hook to a stock one to hold the car in place. The stock front cross brace is not as rigged as the pic mentioned.

One thing you can do if you want to fabricate something to tie the front down, is to use the same cassis bolts as used to bolt the front fender brackets to the chassis. My Dad has a 66 coupe that we built 12 years ago to tow behind his motor home. I fabricated a piece of heavy angle iron to a short piece of 2"x2" tubing and bolted it to the chassis using the bolts mentioned. On my Dad's application I fabricated two extensions that the tow hitch is connected to, and they are pin connected to the two chassis brackets, similar to a hitch and receiver on a truck. We also used a drive-shaft disconnect that is controlled from a lever under his seat, since he pulls it with all four wheels on the ground.

You could fabricate two metal eye brackets and attach in the same location. I know that it'll hold.

There were no Ford front brackets as the back ones you mentioned.
 
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The drive shaft disconnect is an inline joint that is located near the rear U-joint. The drive shaft was shortened and the disconnect was welded in place. If you have ever been in a manual transmission and seen the way the shifting fork moves the collar to lock in two gears, then you have seen the design behind this unit. The fork is moved by a knob attached to a cable that is located under the drivers seat. When the cable is pulled, the fork slides forward moving the collar and it spline-locks the rear of the shaft to the front of the shaft. When the cable is pushed backwards the fork slides the collar back and the front of the drive shaft is not connected to the rear of the shaft. The rear of the shaft then free wheels in a bearing located in the inside of the front shaft, which allows the rear differential to rotate without turning the transmission.

It you are interested in where it was purchased, email me. My email is listed on my personal info. I just emailed a message to my Dad asking him for the company that made it. As I recall, the unit could be bought separate and you would have to have a machine shop do the shaft work. My Dad purchased it already with a modified shaft and it was a bolt on installation.

It’s been on his car about 11 years with no problems.
 
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