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Discussion Starter #1
I’m a few months into the long term rebuilding project of my 65 coupe, finally making a little head way. I recently ordered new rear leafs and bushings, this got me to thinking about dry rot.

I’m expecting this project to take around 10ish years, obviously that a very rough estimate. Anyway, I’m wondering what these nice new rubber bushings, rubber ball joint boots, hoses, belts, etc, are going to look like when I finally “finish” and hit the road, and these new parts are several years old. For instance, those nice new spring bushings may easily be 10 years old before they see the road.

The car lives in my shop, which is enclosed and insulated.

I guess the short question is do I need to worry about part degradation, and if it is an issue, what if anything could be done about it?

I have a feeling I’m just overthinking this and it’s a nonissue, but I’m not sure, so here I am asking you. :shrug:
 

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Some people on this forum are still riding around on factory 50-year-old bushings, so I would expect that probably you'll be fine :p If they start going, replace them and move on with your life.

I would leave the hoses off though if you're expecting to not start the car for the next decade... because exploding dry rotted hoses sound like not that much fun. Same for belts. If you aren't starting it, no need to put them on.

Alternatively, you could get a rubber conditioner and make sure to keep everything lubed up.
 

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Constant changes in temperature, humidity, and UV are what destroys rubber and plastics.

If you really think it's going to be 10 years before you drive the car, then keep everything conditioned :)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks all for the feedback, for what it’s worth my shop is very well sealed up and insulated but I don’t normally keep the air and/or heat on. Just while I’m out there working. Maybe e sometimes when I’m working in the shop or just outside a lot for several days in a row then I’ll leave it on, but normally it stays off

I guess the solution to the likely nonexistent problem will simply be to keep an eye on things and like Kelly said “replace them and move on” if need be. Although Rubber conditioner is cheap, so I’ll probably buy a can and apply a little every year or two, I mean why not. :shrug:

That 150 dollar bushings and shackle kit I recently bought just seems stupid expensive, and when I took them out of the box my first thought was “I sure hope I don’t have to buy this again in 10 years” If I was buying a used vehicle 10 years old many things would be on my inspection list, but rubber dry rot has never entered my mind.

Sometimes I make much ado about nothing I guess. :wink:
 

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"The car lives in my shop, which is enclosed and insulated. "

That's Great, but the REAL Question is....Where the car is stored, How Hot can it really get in there...???


From my decades of experience..and what I have learned... about the "Specific" parts you mentioned...You have absolutely nothing to worry about...

Dry rot only occurs to parts left out in the SUN, UV exposure, or left out in a really Hot climate. If its in a room temperature climate controlled You have nothing to worry about...just make sure wherever its stored does not go over 80 degrees on a regular basis. I'd worry more about tires if I were you more than boots, bushings, belts and hoses.. That's for sure.. But the same goes for the tires as well. As long as they are in a climate controlled environment, They'll be fine.


:eek:)

Tony K.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
"The car lives in my shop, which is enclosed and insulated. "

That's Great, but the REAL Question is....Where the car is stored, How Hot can it really get in there...???
Good question, I’ll have to pay more attn. I have a temp/humidity recorder in my gun safe I may have to put in the shop for a while, just because now I’m curious and then I’ll know for sure. :smile2:

I’d guess, in the hottest part of the summer (July & August) it gets up into the mid 80’s but most of the year (the other 10 months) it probably doesn’t get to 80, but I’m just guessing.

Oh and your right about tires, I had thought of them to just not while writing the OP I guess.
 

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Temp fluctuations don't really have that big an affect on rubber unless there is movement as in super cold and it gets flexed.

The two biggest dangers to rubber is ozone and UV. Keep it away from sunlight and beg electric motors and lightning and you should be fine. Look close at most of these old cars and the topside rubber seals are all cracked. Then climb under and take a look at the bushings and stuff that haven't seen the sun and there is a big difference. My 50+ years old axle snubbers were like new.
 

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How many cars do you think are running around on rubber bushings that are over 10 years old? Of those cars, how many of those drivers do you think are actually concerned? Rick would be a multi-billionaire if everyone replaced rubber bushings every 10 years! :wink:
10 years or more, temp controlled or not- you've got absolutely nothing to worry about. Put 'em in and move on...
 

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I put some tie rod ends on mine and after a year in the garage one of the dust boots came apart and fell off. The other fell off when I touched it. Now you can buy upgraded dust boots made out of urethane or something but in my case I lost all faith in the ends. If they couldn't make the boots any better than that how good could the joints themselves be? Tossed them in favor of a pair of Moog ones. Some twelve years of garage hibernation they still look new. OK, a bit dusty. I haven't noticed any other degradation of the rubber bits so far.

Also being extremely vaguely located somewhere in the South (really?), I have some humidity issues. As hard as I've worked on eliminating rust off stuff the idea of it regenerating while I sleep hacks me off. I actually saw this happen on some parts after a particularly rainy season. So I got a dehumidifier and run it at about "6" on a scale of 1 to 10 that I have no clue about what they mean. In really bad weather sometimes I get almost a gallon a day. It holds a half gallon and in drier weather I only have to empty it once a week or so. I can't prove it helps fro sure but in spring sometimes I would go out to the garage to find my motorcycle literally dripping wet from condensation. The Mustang's engine and transmission too. Kind of a rare thing to happen but I've yet to see it happen again in the five years I've been running the dehumidifier. So I feel like I'm doing something helpful.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I put some tie rod ends on mine and after a year in the garage one of the dust boots came apart and fell off. The other fell off when I touched it. Now you can buy upgraded dust boots made out of urethane or something but in my case I lost all faith in the ends. If they couldn't make the boots any better than that how good could the joints themselves be? Tossed them in favor of a pair of Moog ones. Some twelve years of garage hibernation they still look new. OK, a bit dusty. I haven't noticed any other degradation of the rubber bits so far.

Also being extremely vaguely located somewhere in the South (really?), I have some humidity issues. As hard as I've worked on eliminating rust off stuff the idea of it regenerating while I sleep hacks me off. I actually saw this happen on some parts after a particularly rainy season. So I got a dehumidifier and run it at about "6" on a scale of 1 to 10 that I have no clue about what they mean. In really bad weather sometimes I get almost a gallon a day. It holds a half gallon and in drier weather I only have to empty it once a week or so. I can't prove it helps fro sure but in spring sometimes I would go out to the garage to find my motorcycle literally dripping wet from condensation. The Mustang's engine and transmission too. Kind of a rare thing to happen but I've yet to see it happen again in the five years I've been running the dehumidifier. So I feel like I'm doing something helpful.
To be honest I’ve thought about the humidity as well, I guess I’m so used to it that it doesn’t bother me much. That said once I get the car finished, or at least after I have the body work done then I’ll probably end up with a set up like you have. But for now it doesn’t concern me much, but I’m sure it’s coming,:laugh:


And BTW
Heart of Dixie is to Alabama as Palmetto State is to South Carolina.
 

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I think the engine bits (hoses, belts etc) could wait to be installed and taped off as needed until the project nears that "driving" time frame. Most everything else, like others have said, I am sure will be fine out of the sun. Tires also as you mentioned, but a 10 year project sounds like it will be spending some time on stands anyway.

Plan out the intended use and outline a go forward, buying the same things 2-3x really can throw a wrench in the motivation. G'luck
 

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And BTW
Heart of Dixie is to Alabama as Palmetto State is to South Carolina.
If you say so. That printed on your license plates or something? I've no idea what the deal is with palmetto. Some kind of pain in the butt plant that seems to me would be better exterminated. (I'm not originally from here.) :)
 
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