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Discussion Starter #1
This week I hope to change my fuel line. Not something I am looking forward to and I have tried a few things to not have to do it.
My 65 had sat for about 6 years with gas in the tank that smelled worse than a skunk that was dead for two week.
My problem was and is a blockage in the line. I have used two different compressors trying to blow that blockage out.
from both end the tank side and fuel pump side.
That's why I am changing mines. Blocked Fuel line.
 

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Aside from cleaning out your existing line, I can tell you that I replaced mine simply because it was fifty years old at the time. I can also tell you replacing it was surprisingly easy, much easier than I had imagined.
 

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I replaced my lines because I was getting rusty sludge clogging my carb.
 

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I changed out mine as I needed to go up to 3/8" for EFI. When I had a good look at the original line, it didn't make sense to re-use it even as a return as it was kinked.
 

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I replaced mine because I cut right down the center of it with a cut off wheel.

When I was replacing the driver's side front floor pan I measured everything and made sure everything was clear and drew lines on the floor an all of that. Then when I was cutting the metal looked a little thin so I went an inch or two outside my line to get to thicker metal.

It turns out that about 1" in front of the seat riser is where the fuel line cuts over from the transmission tunnel to the frame rail and I cut right down the center of it.

Aside from that it was working perfectly well for being 50 years old.
 

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I am with 4ocious. I was getting crap in my carb so I replaced the fuel line and tank. The fuel line had been partially crushed by jacking the car up . It was a good time to upsize the line and convert to the proper v8 routing as well.
 

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I had my Mustang since 1968 and ran it until 1975 when I put it in long term storage for over 40 years. Knowing that whatever might have been in the tank would have been nasty to say the least,
I replaced the tank and fuel sensor with new and used new two-piece Stainless gas lines. It's always best to avoid problems when deciding on a full renewal of our classic cars.
 

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I did not like the looks of the o/e lines so I ordered a length of 3/8” stainless from Inline Tube and bent them myself using the old ones for a guide. I subbed the hard line from the firewall to the carb with A/N.
 

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I'll be replacing mine this week because I punctured it with a punch. It was old and rusted anyway so I'm not really that mad I did it. I removed the rear driver shock and the exhaust to help put the new one in place.
 

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when i get to it, i will be replacing all the steel lines in my mustang and falcon both. age has a deleterious effect on metals of all kinds, but brake and fuel lines are safety issues here, so spending a few bucks now will possibly save thousands later on.
 

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Buy some 3/8" aluminum hard line from summit and bend some up yourself- I've done it on several cars now.
I am surprised about the recommendation to use aluminum for fuel lines. Doesn't aluminum tend to break/crack under vibration? I replaced my pump to carb line using a steel line. Aluminum would be much easier to work with, but I didn't want to risk to leak gas on a hot engine.
 

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I bought a 3/8ths line from Fine Lines to replace the original 5/16ths line because I drag race my GT350 and needed more fuel. I probably will be going to 1/2 " soon.I need more fuel yet to go into the 9s.
Randy
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I really would love to know whats stuck in my line that a compressor cant push out. Not one bit of air comes out the back of the line.
 

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1968 coupe, 1968 vert, 1966 coupe
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I really would love to know whats stuck in my line that a compressor cant push out. Not one bit of air comes out the back of the line.
Did you try blowing from the other direction with the compressor? Sound stupid but if there’s a build up it might no be able to pass it out if you blow the other way that the way it came through there should be less “obstacles” Just my 2¢
 

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I am surprised about the recommendation to use aluminum for fuel lines. Doesn't aluminum tend to break/crack under vibration? I replaced my pump to carb line using a steel line. Aluminum would be much easier to work with, but I didn't want to risk to leak gas on a hot engine.
Most light aircraft use aluminum tubing for fuel lines. I used it for the fuel delivery system on the EXP homebuilt I made back in the seventies. AFAIK it is still flying today.
 
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Mine developed a pin hole leak underneath the guard were it comes out from under and runs along the outer rocker.
 

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Your filters were not getting the sludge?
Did you do the tank too the sludge source?
I had already done the tank, fuel filler and fuel sender. The rust particles were so fine they were in suspension. After about an hour of driving the car would run rough and I would have to clean out the carb and replace the filter. Replaced the fuel lines and fuel pump and never had another issue
 
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