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Discussion Starter #1
So what options do i have for improving the traction at the rear wheels?
The car is a 65 mustang with a open 8" rear end. I know this sets som limits to how good the traction can be, but it really has no traction at all. If the ground is just a little wet, the car will just spin the tires with only 2% throttle when going off from a stop.
Any mods i can do to improve traction without spending money on a 9" rear end?
i really want to be able to use the power from my newly rebuld engine (around 300Hp).
I have aftermarket adjustable shocks, that are stiffer than original, but that did not make a difference


Thanks
 

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First thing to look at is the tires. How old are they? How wide? Quality? When younger, I used to shop price and a couple experiences made me realize a lot of my traction issues were the cheap tires I had bought.
Then start looking at trac lock for that rear end. Nine inch rear won't make a difference if you have the same gears etc., nine inch just handles more power without tearing up.
 

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Does it spin cleanly or do you have wheel hop? If you have wheel hop then something like a Caltrak bar might help but it is probably overkill for what you have. Best option probably is stickier tires.
 

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Assuming you aren’t running tires that are older than me, many seem to swear on traction bars fixing their problems, though I haven’t tried them myself. A proper set of subframe connectors can help aswell for around the corners if that’s your problem. There plenty of options available, but really depends on exactly what cause of traction loss you’re experiencing.
 

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Good tires with AA traction rating and a Currie traction lock for 8” (3.25 and 235/40/18 performance all seasons).

I have both on mine.

I went with the all seasons due to temperatures in my area can be cold and sunny.

Summer performance tires tend to be hard in cold climates around 40F (4.4C) and can be like driving on bald tires.

Only time I don’t have traction is loose sand/gravel...or way too much throttle.
 

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9” rear end will have no effect on traction. It’s benefit is that it’s a stronger unit.

You should start with a trac lock unit, especially if you want to fully use your new motor.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the replys. The tires are BFgoodrich radial T/As. aorund 6 years old with plenty of meat.
I meant posi track / lock regarding the 9" rear end.
The problem accurs in 2 scenarios: one is when starting off from ex. a red light, i cannot accelerate without wheelspin, only if i "feed" the accelerator very slowly. The one scenario is when i accelerate at rolling speed, example i put my foot down with 30-50 mph, then it will do a little wheelspin and fishtail (very scary).
 

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Start with a 50# bag of sand in the trunk and see what that does for you. $5 at Lowes.
 
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Your second sentence says it all. BFG’s are notorious for poor traction, and being 6 years old makes it even worse....try some new tires and report back. If your in doubt, borrow a set from a friends mustang and try them out....
 

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Your second sentence says it all. BFG’s are notorious for poor traction, and being 6 years old makes it even worse....try some new tires and report back. If your in doubt, borrow a set from a friends mustang and try them out....
Agree with this. Some tires get hard as they age making traction worse and worse over time even thought they look fine. My Falken tires did this. Now I have Nitto NT05s and traction is way better.
 

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You are not going to fix wet traction. Thats inherent in a car with a 60/40-ish weight distribution.
 

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Better tires, limited slip, a little more rear weight bias (aluminum engine parts, Fiberglas hood/fenders, Battery in the trunk, etc., how much do you want to spend?) Tires would be the cheapest/quickest way to start. 6 year old BFGs are not going to be grippy in the least.
 

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instead of starting with tires, lets start with the rear springs shall we? are they original to the car? if so then they are probably worn out and having issues with spring wrap. if they have been replaced recently, then a set of traction bars will be a good start, caltracs are the best, but the under ride bars that shelby used from traction masters do fine and they are easy enough to install.

next would then be the tires. dump the BFGs and get a set of faulkens or kumhos, or even yokohamas. i have found them to be rather sticky in various applications, even in the wet.

next we need to do something about the weight distribution, as much as possible. move the battery to the trunk, place it over the right rear tire, or as close as possible.this will give the best compromise overall. some get a bit lazy and just put the battery in the right rear quarter behind the wheel well.

these are the least expensive and most easily doable options available. after that you start to redesign the rear suspension.
 

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Like others stated, the right tires will fix that. We had a Mini Cooper that came with Continentals from the factory. The car had great traction and hugged the road like a go-cart. For the first tire change I bought some Kumo's mostly because they were cheaper. They were garbage, the car spun out when pulling away from a stop light. Traction was bad. Went back to a performance tire with a softer compound, quite a difference.
 
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