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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 289 that has been sitting on an engine stand while I been rebuilding a 64 1/2 vert pretty much from the ground up. I am ready to drop the engine back in over the holiday. Wanted to get some insights on any precautions, things I should do before turn the key.

As always thanks for the input.
 

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The biggest thing I can think of is to prime it first with oil. There’s a drill attachment that you can get which will spin the oil pump.
 

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I'm getting ready to install my 289 as well in the next couple of weeks. Does the oil pump turn clockwise? I'm sure it would soon be obvious. I was going to prime the pump by removing the pressure sending unit and turn it till I see oil discharged from that port, then install the engine and just before starting pump some more oil. How long between when I install the cam lube and lifters before starting? Will it drip off the cam if it sets a couple of weeks before starting?
 

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Counter clockwise rotation and I just use a socket and extension, 5/16 I think to turn it. Be patient and keep pressure on it until you see oil pushing through all the rockers.
 

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Fresh oil, and also poured into the filter so it doesn't start dry, prime with a drill til the rockers weep, maybe a little spray of Marvel Mystery Oil into each plug hole, turn the engine by handle a little at the crank to move everything around, plugs back in, and I like to fill the fuel tank, prime the line and fill the fuel bowl with non-ethanol gas...set your choke...let er rip !
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Update.....
installed engine, located tdc, set timing at about 10 degrees before TDC, primed oil pump, put a little bit of marvel mystery oil in each cylinder, Installed new plugs/wires and distributor cap. ran a can of non-ethanol fuel to the fuel pump, choked and turned the key....It ran first turn of the key. I ran it several times for just a few seconds as the exhaust manifolds were open with no h-pipe and no pulley to the water Pump (Need to install generator).

I then proceeded to install the dual exhaust. Installed h-pipe, and pipes to mufflers and hung mufflers. Was dying to Hear how it sounded. Re-connected battery, turned the key.....would only run for a second or so. Tried several times, wouldn’t start. Pulled plugs they were soaked. Connection at h-pipe to muffler pipe on passenger side was dripping fuel/oil (none on the other side). Reinstalled dry/cleaned plugs....same result. Runs for a second or so and then nothing. tried several times, pipes are warm to the touch so something is firing.

Is this a cruel coincidence or might there be an adjusemtent i need to make due to the additional back pressure from the mufflers? I haven’t taken the exhaust system back out yet to see if it will run. Won’t be hard but kills me to do it. I also haven’t attached the vacuum line from the distributor to the carburetor.

any suggestions for a part time junior associate novice mechanic?


746647
 

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I am far from an expert, but it sure sounds like the engine is drowning in fuel. The carb would be my first guess, too.
 

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One of the reasons you want everything perfect before the first start the engine is to break-in the camshaft. You want the engine to fire up and then immediately take it right up to 2000-2500 rpm for 30 minutes. You don't want to be messing around with the timing and the fuel during the break-in procedure, turning the engine off and on while your messing with it. Don't worry about your engine it ill be fine. Just solve your fuel problem before you run it anymore. Besides the camshaft lobes, that fuel is washing the oil off of you cylinder walls while you are also trying to break-in the rings If its really bad it has diluted the oil. Pull the dipstick and make sure the oil does smell like gas real bad.

One of the things you can do with a carburetor before you install it is to blow into the fuel inlet and while your blowing flip the carb upside down and the float will close the needle and seat and you will no longer be able to blow through it. I do this on every single carb I rebuild before I stick it on. I might endup with mouth cancer but the carbs do not overflow.

Comp Cams break-in procedure.


 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks all. Motor was not rebuilt. I pulled the intake manifold to paint it. Put on a “new” carb, new field pump, new distributor cap and new plugs, wires and coil. I dont need to break in the motor. I did prime the oil pump. Seems i have a carb issue. Strange thing was the engine ran great without the exhaust system. Must be coincidental with a carb issue.

tonight i checked out the float. Seems fine. Still baffled. I am not a car expert. one thing i noticed is that when the accelerator is in the full “idle“ position, that is, gas pedal not pressed at all, the linkage to the accelerator pump is not fully “extended” that is the accelerator pump is somewhat “pulled in”.

Still not sure why the motor is getting so much fuel.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Meant to say “not a “carb” expert”. But I guess I’m not a car expert neither. Just not afraid to take things apart and turn wrenches!
 

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I think your floats need to be adjusted. With no back pressure from the exhaust while it was out, the engine will burn whatever you put in it... I've never seen mufflers on a dragster... how 'bout you? :)
I have two Holley 4160s. Rebuilt the spare and installed it, but the car ran like crap, so I put the old one back on. Ran great, but then it started leaking. Had to replace one of the float adjusters. I looked at the float adjuster before I removed it, counted the threads I could see, adjusted the new float adjusters accordingly...


If they're too high you'll be dumping too much fuel into the intake. Seeing it's not a re-build, you should be able to crank them down, then work them up until the engine runs.
Ditto on pull the dipstick. If it smells like gas, drain it, refill with fresh oil, and try to start it with the floats pushed down and work them up til it fires.
 

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If it was a Holley 4V carb I'd guess it might have a ruptured power valve diaphragm dumping fuel. Not sure what kind of power valve lives inside your carb? Those power valves ruptured all the time in the Holleys on our F600s at work. All it took was one backfire up though the carb to wipe it out. You knew it was leaking when you closed all the idle mixture screws and it had no effect on it. That should have shut off all the fuel at idle. If its still running its getting fuel from someplace else in the carburetor.


Stick something in the carb to hold that choke plate wide open (something that can't fall down inside the engine like a giant screwdriver?. When the carb is cold the choke plate rotates shut. When you start the engine a choke pull off opens the plate so the engine can get just enough air to run. But the choke plate is still closed most of the way. As the electric choke heats up it opens the choke plate all the way, straight up and down. The choke pull off can go bad, the electric choke can go bad and that plate won't open and the engine will drown in fuel. With that plate open you can look down in there (with goggles) and see if you can see fuel pouring out

The electric choke is adjustable by loosing the screws on the side and rotating it. That way you can set the choke plate to what ever angle works best when the engine is cold. For now you can bypass the choke pull off and electric choke by sticking something in thereto hold the choke plate fully open just to see what it does idling in your driveway. If it straightens out your problem your choke is not opening.
 

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before you do anything else, go through the carb. Just get it right with new rubber etc. If the car was parked with ethanol fuel in it, the rubber is likely toast. you could have corrosion on the inner surfaces gumming everything up, time to go in and get it right. Otherwise you'll be chasing your tail fixing this and that. I would also put a new fuel pump on it. That way you start with a good fuel baseline, what's $30 - half to a quarter of a tow home...
 
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