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Mine lets you walk in a few feet and tell the guy what you want.
 

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Discussion Starter · #122 ·
In the future, I might look back and think that I should have installed items that would allow for greater performance. But, at this time, I really just want a good driver that has pretty good response and is easy to maintain and repair and decent if not good fuel economy, thus the performer and 500CFM carburetor. I went with ARP stainless manifold bolts, ARP valve cover bolts, and ARP thermostat housing bolts. I understand ARP bolts may be overkill, and they were pricey at $100.00 for those I listed, but I don't have many other bad habits.
 

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In the future, I might look back and think that I should have installed items that would allow for greater performance. But, at this time, I really just want a good driver that has pretty good response and is easy to maintain and repair and decent if not good fuel economy, thus the performer and 500CFM carburetor. I went with ARP stainless manifold bolts, ARP valve cover bolts, and ARP thermostat housing bolts. I understand ARP bolts may be overkill, and they were pricey at $100.00 for those I listed, but I don't have many other bad habits.
ARP stainless is a horse of a different color. They are very strong.
 

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Dimples
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I realize I’m late to the party and admittedly didn’t read every post. That said, it sounds like you went in the right direction.

My personal preference is an Enelbrock Performer RPM no matter what, and a Holley 4100 series (I run a 4180 Ford carb that’s been hot rodded) for performance, but am a big fan of a 390 CFM Summit carb for an otherwise stock C code.
 

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Discussion Starter · #127 ·
Update and questions: Got my nice Arp hex cap screws (term I learned and not to be confused with bolts) in today. The instructions advise that stainless cap screws (bolts) must have anti-seize applied. So, first question, will the Permatex high temperature thread sealant (small white bottle), US Part Number: 59214, suffice as a thread anti-seize recommended by Arp?

In addition, the instruction sheet with the cap screws indicated that you cannot torque these cap screws to the manufacturers recommended torque values when using anti-seize on the threads, the torque value must be lower. So, second question, since I will be using thread anti-seize on the cap screws, and since Edelbrock recommends 18-20 foot pounds for the 2121 intake manifold, what should the final torque value be?

794119
 

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Update and questions: Got my nice Arp hex cap screws (term I learned and not to be confused with bolts) in today. The instructions advise that stainless cap screws (bolts) must have anti-seize applied. So, first question, will the Permatex high temperature thread sealant (small white bottle), US Part Number: 59214, suffice as a thread anti-seize recommended by Arp?

In addition, the instruction sheet with the cap screws indicated that you cannot torque these cap screws to the manufacturers recommended torque values when using anti-seize on the threads, the torque value must be lower. So, second question, since I will be using thread anti-seize on the cap screws, and since Edelbrock recommends 18-20 foot pounds for the 2121 intake manifold, what should the final torque value be?

View attachment 794119
Anti seize is always a good thing to apply to bolts. 15-20 lbs is a good number, not a super critical torque number here.It is aluminum so flat washers under the bolt head to prevent galling of intake. run it thru a couple of heat cycles then torque to 20 lbs and you will be golden!
 

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Update and questions: Got my nice Arp hex cap screws (term I learned and not to be confused with bolts) in today. The instructions advise that stainless cap screws (bolts) must have anti-seize applied. So, first question, will the Permatex high temperature thread sealant (small white bottle), US Part Number: 59214, suffice as a thread anti-seize recommended by Arp?

In addition, the instruction sheet with the cap screws indicated that you cannot torque these cap screws to the manufacturers recommended torque values when using anti-seize on the threads, the torque value must be lower. So, second question, since I will be using thread anti-seize on the cap screws, and since Edelbrock recommends 18-20 foot pounds for the 2121 intake manifold, what should the final torque value be?

View attachment 794119
Thread sealant and anti-seize are NOT the same things. Anti-seize is a good idea anytime dissimilar metals are fastened together as it prevents galvanic corrosion. Anti-seize typically comes in a silvery paste, in a tube or a large bottle with a brush. Go easy, it is hard to clean off of stuff. For small parts the tube is fine.

 

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Discussion Starter · #131 ·
Not sure if I understand the table and the implications. Are these maximum values and then I should extrapolate reductions for dry and lubricated? If so, I can derive the percentage reduction for torque values and apply it to what I need. For instance, if Edelbrock indicates 18-20, and then if I know a certain percentage to reduce I can apply that to the base number, say 19 foot pounds.
 

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Values in the tables are max. Read the table footnotes. It states -15% for low value. Personally I would use Permatex Aviation Form-A-Gasket on the threads that enter the valley and Permatex Anti-Sieze on the corners with stainless bolts. I also wouldn’t bother with stainless hardware, but you have it already...so install it.

Having said that, I think the ARP stainless bolts are 160ksi equivalent. So lubricated the torque value would be 15-18 lb-ft.
 

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Values in the tables are max. Read the table footnotes. It states -15% for low value. Personally I would use Permatex Aviation Form-A-Gasket on the threads that enter the valley and Permatex Anti-Sieze on the corners with stainless bolts. I also wouldn’t bother with stainless hardware, but you have it already...so install it.

Having said that, I think the ARP stainless bolts are 160ksi equivalent. So lubricated the torque value would be 15-18 lb-ft.
You are not building a space ship here, any bolts to be just snug equals about 10-12 pounds, then go a little more. I have used permatex number 2 or silicone for the last 45 years no problems. The trick you need to get a FEEL for, is when you are using lets say a 3/ 8 ratchet how much torque you are applying then you will know what 20 ft lbs. feels like. Install it then check it with a torque wrench so you can see and feel what you have done. Good Luck
 

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Not sure if I understand the table and the implications. Are these maximum values and then I should extrapolate reductions for dry and lubricated? If so, I can derive the percentage reduction for torque values and apply it to what I need. For instance, if Edelbrock indicates 18-20, and then if I know a certain percentage to reduce I can apply that to the base number, say 19 foot pounds.
Page 26 is where you want to look.

794221


Given you will be using an anti-seize or sealant, use the "lube" spec. 210 in*lbs = 17.5 ft*lbs MAX. 15 ft*lb is about 15% less for the low end.
 

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Discussion Starter · #136 ·
Dry fitting the manifold gaskets. Do I need to trim part of the gasket that covers a portion of the water port? Also, do I need to notch out a portion of the gasket for the vacuum line that runs to the vacuum modulator on the transmission? Looks like the gasket would align better if the gasket was notched for the metal line.
795209
 

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Discussion Starter · #137 ·
Also, different answers in a search; does the raised portion (the small raised rubber line) around each port go face up as I have them here or face down towards the the head? And what are the notches at the bottom of the gasket?
 

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Dry fitting the manifold gaskets. Do I need to trim part of the gasket that covers a portion of the water port? Also, do I need to notch out a portion of the gasket for the vacuum line that runs to the vacuum modulator on the transmission? Looks like the gasket would align better if the gasket was notched for the metal line. View attachment 795209
Looking at those gaskets, yes, I would cut the small section out. 351W and later model heads have slightly different ports and this gasket is able to be used with each type. I would gently try to tweak the tube before I trim the gasket at the back.
 

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Also, different answers in a search; does the raised portion (the small raised rubber line) around each port go face up as I have them here or face down towards the the head? And what are the notches at the bottom of the gasket?
The small rubber should go towards the intake manifold. Edelbrock makes a product called Gasgacinch that you can use to attach the gasket to the head prior to dropping the intake on. It is not needed, as I usually put a thin coat of rtv around the water ports on the head side which will hold the gasket in place. The notches on the bottom are there to overlap with cork end gaskets, most guys don't use them anymore, they just run a bead of silicone.


 

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Discussion Starter · #140 ·
Ok, update. Intake manifold is on. Now to the other items such as the vacuum line to the transmission, the water lines, the temperature sensor, the thermostat housing, the distributor and the carburetor. Any suggestions on a specific order that makes it easier?

795229
 
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