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Discussion Starter #1
I have a quick question, i am assuming this has been asked before. so here it is again. as i needed to take off my intake for a repair, i am going to put it on and i have a question. The first time i put my new manifold on i used ALOT of silicon Gasket Maker and everything was fine. the second time i used less, and it leaked. now, i am going to put it on again, and i have heard different things from people at the same local parts store, one said to put a lot of "goop" as i call it, on the gasket, and then i was in there today and another guy said to not put any. i looked this up and i seemed to be getting mixed results.

So i was wondering, do you put 'Goop' on your intake manifold gasket? if you do, how much? also, what about your front and real seals? some people say use 'Goop' only and some use the cork gasket and goop.

Thank you,

RagingPony
 

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i "NEVER" "EVER" used gasket maker after a few friends did and had leaks. if i have to pull an intake i just put a new gasket back on. its cheap insurance. i NEVER EVER put anything on intake or head gaskets. i use a bead of silicone in place of the intake end seal and i put a very light finger wipe of silicone on the oil pan,water pump,front cover,t-stat housing and valve cover gaskets for easy removal only. if you have an aluminum intake NEVER use the blue fel pro gasket, use the print-o-seal. if an intake gasket leaks coolant on the water passage in the lifetr valley it will mix water with the oil and can take out the entire engine.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I am using a thicker rubber fel pro gasket. In the instructions it even says to use some of the gaskt maker. I think i wont use it tho. I hav the problem of it leaking, thats why i had to replace it in the first place.
 

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Do it your way and then if it leaks you get to do it again. I have a buddy that builds some awsome big block motors and he always uses a little sealer on the surfaces. A little sealer is good insurance.
 

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You should use a very thin amount of silicone around the water ports on the head side of the gaskets. I like Honda bond or ultra gray for this. Some will also use a very light amount around the intake ports but do not get carried away with it. Use the felpro printoseal #1250 or 1262 if you have larger ports. No sealer on the intake side. use a thick bead for the end seals and I will let them sit for about 15 min before I install the intake.
 

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No silicone, no end gaskets. Get a can of "The Right Stuff". Spray a bead of it on each end rail and drop intake on while wet.

IT IS IMPERATIVE that the gasket surfaces be VERY clean. I mean white glove clean. I use lacquer thinner.
 

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I assume you're talking Ford smallblock? On those I get things hospital clean. I then put a light bead around the water passages. Next I crazy glue the end gaskets to the block. I put a dab of sealer in each of the end gasket 4 corners,install manifold. let it sit until cured. Knock on wood,I've never had a leak.
 

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Issues with proper sealing are magnified when blocks are decked, heads shaved etc to the point where an intake may not even be close to fitting correctly requiring the intake to be machined for a proper fit.
At a minimum I've always used a contact spray on the intake ports, silicon around the water ports and built up my own end gaskets. Why take the chance?
 

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I'm "old school" with engine gaskets. Thin coat on both sides, a blob at the corners where the gaskets join. Works great.

 

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I agree with some of the others who do not use anything on the head to manifold gaskets and very little silicone on the two end rubber gaskets just to hold them in place. I do put a small, I mean small, amount at the connection of the rubber seal to the head/manifold gasket. Never had a leak and always run the manifold bolts down evenly and I torque the bolts in three steps (increments) with the correct pattern. Another good practice is to use 4 studs in place of bolts as guides to set the manifold in place. This stops the need to move the manifold to align the bolts, which can move the rubber gaskets.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thank you guys for all your advice, i think i may use the procedure from "vintage Automotive Products" i dont really feel comfterable NOT using anything, so i will just use some by the water passages and some permatex sealer on the intake ports, and a HEFTY bead of silicon RTV on the front and rear seal.

Thank you,
Raging Pony
 

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Thank you guys for all your advice, i think i may use the procedure from "vintage Automotive Products" i dont really feel comfterable NOT using anything, so i will just use some by the water passages and some permatex sealer on the intake ports, and a HEFTY bead of silicon RTV on the front and rear seal.

Thank you,
Raging Pony
One thing you need to think about is port alignment. How do your ports look with the gasket you're using just set on them, no torque? Would a thicker gasket help?

My last motor required extra thick Mr. Gasket paper gaskets...and to be honest I kind of like those better than the Fel-Pro's. The crush factor is nice. They will seal a 2* gap from angle milled heads without issue. I always smear permatex around the water ports (regardless of the gasket brand), add a dab at the corners as many of these gentlemen reminded me to mention...and build up my own end gaskets rather than using the end seals. I've used/use Ultra Black, Ultra Grey, Ultra Copper (I use this instead of header gaskets as well...yes I know it says 700*f, I don't care...it works), or if I'm really serious and using a vacuum pump or don't intend to ever remove it lol, the Right Stuff.

Just be glad you don't have to MAKE your intake gaskets like I do now lol.

Good luck!

Cris
 

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Issues with proper sealing are magnified when blocks are decked, heads shaved etc to the point where an intake may not even be close to fitting correctly requiring the intake to be machined for a proper fit.
At a minimum I've always used a contact spray on the intake ports, silicon around the water ports and built up my own end gaskets. Why take the chance?
There is a lot to be said for this. Most new aluminum intakes need machining just to get them flat.
 

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I would think you need to put gasket maker around the corners of the intake just in case the corners don't seal well.
+1. Our shop has built countless motors and replaced thousands of intake gaskets over the years. I always use RTV/gasket maker at the corners of the front and rear gaskets, where they meet and join with the head gaskets. You don't have to go crazy and use an entire tube, but a little where those two gaskets join together is cheap insurance.
 

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I have read this more and more on the end gaskets. Were the rubber gaskets that come with the intake kits inferior? I will be going thru this soon on my 351C with the metal valley pan and gasket set
 

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I'm "old school" with engine gaskets. Thin coat on both sides, a blob at the corners where the gaskets join. Works great.

+1 did mine last summer and it does not leak at all.
I used the ultra high tack stuff. I "glued" the cork end gaskets to the block and let them cure. That way they dont squeeze out when you torque down the manifold. Like other stated, a little around the water passages and where the gaskets meet. Thats all I did and it is perfect.
 
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