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Discussion Starter #1
Okay....frustrating day.
I worked all day on stripping the paint (was not the original laquer, it had Rustoleum over gray primer) from the interior driver door. The paint came off fairly easily with aircraft stripper and a brass brush. There were areas of pitting rust under the area usually covered by the door shields, so I went after those areas with Rustoleum brand rust stripper(hydrochloric acid and phosphoric acid) and the brass brush. The instructions on the back of the rust stripper said to rinse the residue with lots of water. Being the newbie I am, I believed them and got an immediate lesson in what has to be flash rust. So, I went back over the danged door again with the brass brush 'til the point my husband felt sorry for me and finished it up. Now, some of the rusty film is still there, and I don't know what to do next. Do I use the rust remover again but wipe it down with something else to prep it for the etching primer or what?
 
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Don’t worry, I learned this the same way you have just experienced. I believe you need to find your local automotive paint/body shop supply store. They have specific products and chemicals designed and used to prep bare metal for paint (primer). I used PPG brand products after stripping the entire car panel by panel (yes, including the dash and doors). Imagine my horror as I diligently made sure the aircraft stripper was all off by scrubbing the bare metal with plenty of water and soap, only to have it form a stain of rust before my eyes here in the South Florida climate. It appears the metal prep products are small parts acid that turn the rust inert and etch the metal for the primer to adhere.

I just stumble through this (after reading up on the subject) and learn as I go… hopefully a pro will chime in and set us both straight.
 

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Thanks Keyscop. I don't feel like such a bonehead now. I'll go visit The Bodyman's Friend tomorrow...
 

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Keys Cop. Go up to the Home Depot in Homestead or one in the Keys and look for a product called Ospho. Advance/Discount Auto, also sells a product called "Right Stuff". Both of these products are Phosphoric Acid, which will neutralize surface rust and etch the metal making it paint ready after an 8 hour cure time. A light scuff with a scotchbrite and you're ready for a thin coat of primer and paint. A little pricey but for interiors, prime the metal with a thin lite coat of metal etch primer in a large spray can. Interior lacquer paint will go over it. Body shop supply shops sell it. Get it at Finish Master, just North of Cutler Ridge. Live in Kendall so I know your paint conditions-not good this time of year. After getting the Ospho, put a 409 spray nozzle in the bottle. :)
 
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Hi Yellowstang
I have known and used Ospho for years but find it to leave a high residual of oxide or transformed rust. It also seems to take forever to dry. I just get the impression this stuff is more for industrial type of applications, i.e. welding, iron etc. I was under the impression the automotive designed stuff was more applicable to what we are doing. Let me know what you think for I am all ears.

Thanks
 

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I stripped to bare metal, washed with Dupont brand automotive cleaner/degreaser/wax remover, rinsed with plenty of water and immediately dried the metal an dapplied a PPG automotive product called "metal prep". The metal prep lightly etched the metal and left a slight posphate coating that temporarily inhibits formation of flash rust. It looks a lot like rust, but is just the coating. To be sure, you can wipe the metal down with a clean rag after the metal prerp, and before applying an epoxy self-etching primer. The epoxy primer is water resistent and you can actually drive around for up to 6 months before worrying about water getting under it (unlike the rattle can lacquer primers). I would not use any rustoleum brand paint products as some of the literature I have read states that the automotive paint (I think it is PPG) is incompatible with something in the rustoleum primers. good luck.
 
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