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Regarding today's earlier posts, I think my comments that inventing for cars was a waste of time may have looked like I was taking a shot at Whisperer. Nothing of the sort! His T-lock looks pretty cool and he's a damn smart guy to come up with it. I was only trying to point out the problems of trying to sell your idea to a major automotive company and actually collect on it.

Which brings me to Hal Kearns, who invented and PATENTED a major automotive feature that appears on every automobile I'm aware of made today. Hal Kearns invented and held the patent for electrically timed intermittent windshield washers long before they ever went on any car, anywhere. He was awarded his patent in 1964.

He couldn't sell the idea. Years later his idea showed up on cars made by every major American automotive company. He sued for 6 BILLION DOLLARS. He fought hard for 12 years trying to get a trial. He lost his wife. He lost his health. He payed out huge legal fees. In the end, a jury awarded him 5 million dollars. Is that a lot of money? It was estimated that by ignoring his patent, the car companies saved themselves AT LEAST $500 MILLION DOLLARS.

Do I think that means you should be a coach potato? No I don't. But I wouldn't ignore history either.

Good luck to all inventors everywhere! May justice prevail and your licensing fees runneth over.


Phil
 

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An inventor will always have his/her creativity....a thief has nothing of real value.

I realize that's a small comfort in our competitive, capitalistic society, but I've found in my travels and upon reflection that there are indeed some things (actually many) more important than money...

Interestingly, I'm purely by happenstance developing a completely new steering actuator system for a particular brand of tractor forklift (it's my big job of the week *G*)....will I get rich? Likely not.....but if it makes my customer happy (who has thousands of customers), I might just get the chance to invent a little more...

And so goes life..*G*
 

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Phil, I didn't take your comments that way, nor were my comments directed at you personally in any way. No offense here.

What I was trying to get at, (and maybe it came across wrong), is that in today's society there is so much focus on why things won't work, why you can't be successful, and it's just not true. We are constantly bombarded with horror stories in the press about how badly this person or that person got run over by big business that we sometimes loose track that in America you are free to pursue any dream that you can envision. Sure, it happens occasionally but it's not the norm, it's the exception.

For every "Little guy that got run over by big business" story there are 20 self made millionaires walking around. I don't buy much into conspiracy theories, there is always another side to the story that you aren't hearing...........
 

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Look at Smokey Yunick's work as well.

Smokey came up with a 351W that got 80 MPG. It did it at 150MPH tho, which made it a bit impractical. It was purchased by one of the big 3 and shelved.

Smokey also came up with a design for an engine that used some of the residual heat to pre-heat the fuel before it entered the carb, thus allowing it to better atomize. This made lots of power and great MPG. It was also purchased by one fo the big 3 and shelved.

The list goes on and on with different inventors and inventions.
 

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Look at Smokey Yunick's work as well

Amen to that...Smokey, Jack Rousch, Bob Glidden, Zora Arkus Duntov, Bill "Grumpy" Jenkins and many others are considered as gods by many of us old time racers; and racing was only a small part of their contributions to the automotive world. While I might respect someone like Vic Edelbrock for the quality of the parts his company produces (and has done so for decades), it's just not the same. One (Edelbrock) is business and the other is passion. Any of the others who became rich monetarily did so purely by coincidence, IMO. An interesting blend of this duality would be the contributions of Dick Moroso, now departed, who was a die-hard racer who made a business out of his "racer's tricks". I used his vac-u-pans, valve covers, oil pans, crank scrapers and a host of other little things that made Moroso the big company it is today.

As an aside, I remember watching Glidden (for the first of numerous times) in the pits at OCIR, '78 World Finals IIRC, and you could see it (the passion) in his eyes, while he massaged the 335-based beast of his creation (I learned hi-port plate design from him, by reading and careful observation). He won that race with the "shoebox" *G*, one of the few undefeated cars ever to run Pro Stock... In a twist of fate, the race car I would buy the following year was offered to make room for an ex-Glidden car ('74 or '75 Pinto IIRC) to take the place of the vintage (at the time, not so *G*) Mustang I would bend to my will.
http://www.nhra.com/museum/features/images/bob_glidden_78_ford_fairmont.jpg

Hey, thanks for bringing back some good memories! *G*
 
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