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Discussion Starter #1
those were the words of a guy i talked to today that sells 60s mustangs. he said he didnt recommend me getting a 67 mustang at my age(17) because it will always break down. should i be concerned about this? im looking to spend around $5000 for a well running mustang, which ive found a lot of on the internet. this guy said that for $5000 i should expect to get a mustang that i am planning on putting a new engine into and restoring it. he said for a well runnning mustang i should expect to pay $8000-13000, which is rediculous. but this guys mustangs start at $10000. they have a manual 66 for sale right now, very powerful 289, for $15000! what is EVERYONES opinion on what this guy is saying? btw i do have a very good mechanic friend that is planning on helping me with the mustang, so im not completely in the dark with fixing things on a mustang.
thanks for the opinions

alex
 

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that guy sounds like a total moron. i would stop talking to him if i was you. and your mechanic friend needs to become you... you're going to have to understand how the car works unless you want it in the shop often. the cars are 35+ years old, and things will go wrong every so often. if you know how to fix it yourself it usualy will be no big deal, but if you've got to take it somewhere any little thing isnt working right than it might be rough having it as your only car.
just my $.02 anyways

- Jason
 

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Now I'm showing my age, when I was in high school, a nice Mustang or Camero was going for $1,200. The average was about $800. A showroom type Mustang depending on model, part of the country, will go for $15 to 20K. A nice Mustang probably around $8k for an average. Now since you are 17, you want a car that is not going to leave you stranded, but you don't mind working on it now and then when it needs a little TLC. For $5k, you should be able to get a coupe that has a decent drivetrain, but the interior and paint is going to need some work. Since you are not traveling long distances, its probably a good car for you, just have someone else who knows cars too go with you as well, to act as a devil's advocate.
 

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Jason is right...this guy is insane. My Mustang was bought for $3800.00. It is a 1965 coupe with a inline six cylinder engine and C4 transmission. After I replaced the battery, starter (a working starter came with the car), solenoid, and the appropriate wires my Mustang has had no engine troubles at all (except for when I would screw with it). It has a strong running, indestructible I6 in it. It did not cost $10,000 just because it runs well. This guy is ridiculous. ::
 

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Discussion Starter #6
just have someone else who knows cars too go with you as well, to act as a devil's advocate.
thanks for the reply, do you mean when going to go buy a mustang bring someone? because i would never buy a mustang without my friend going to make sure im not buying a dud.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
and your mechanic friend needs to become you... you're going to have to understand how the car works unless you want it in the shop often. if you know how to fix it yourself it usualy will be no big deal, but if you've got to take it somewhere any little thing isnt working right than it might be rough having it as your only car.
- Jason
ive been thinking about that, your completely right. i was thinking that my friend could help me and get me started teaching me about cars so soon i wouldnt need his help ALL the time. i especially wouldnt want to get him mad by bugging him every time the car doesnt start. what thing are typical to mustangs breaking down? i was a little suprised by what that guy said to me, especially since he doesnt own a mustang! this guy also said he would never get granada brakes for a mustang, he said (something on the lines of) its dumb to do that. drum brakes are a main concern for me because well i dont want to get in an accident.
thanks for all the help guys(and girls)
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Sorry for all the relpys. i forgot to mention that i think my dad is afraid of me getting a mustang, he might think i might drive it reclessly ect. he recently said if i get a mustang i have to pay all insurance and gas by myself. am i just jumping the gun wanting a mustang? my dad said he thinks he will be stuck paying the insurance/gas and im going to be fixing it performance wise, which is completely wrong. i would be happy just owning a mustang. and in the future when i have the money id like to slowly fix it up. am i being stupid?
thanks a lot for listening, lol
 

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A well running Mustang? Hmmm Lets exmine that shall we... An engine that will always start figure new plugs cap battery good carburettor good plug wires and good coil All new belts and a good radiator so it will keep its cool. All new belts new fuel pump and of course the fresh oil and filter change. Along with a fresh flushing of the cooling system. New thermostat and new water pump. New valve cover gaskets. Good exhaust system thats not going to fall off somewhere.. Brakes need a complete going over and new hoses fluid flush and shoes/pads and or drums and rotors perhaps a new master cylinder. If its an automatic then you need the bands adjusted and filter and fluid changed and the pan dropped and cleaned out. How good is your ignition switch ( a common failure part)? Are all your lights in working order?

Just a few things to think about if you really want a car to be reliable (Lets not forget the new battery and pertronix ignition and new alternator) The key point here is that you can not afford to get stuck anywhere and you want the confidence in knowing exactly what you have in your Mustang. This cost money and the sooner you realize that, the more realistic you will be in getting your Mustang. Good work and Good parts costs $$ and is worth the effort. Personally I would rather do it myself as I then know exactly what I have in my car. $5000 is about right for a 6 cylinder here in CA that would need all of the above mentioned stuff. Add money for interior and paint and you will easily break the 8000 barrier. Mustangs that have all of this stuff done and are done with integrity do NOT break down.
 

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The problem isn't with the cars, it's with the people who've tried to work on them when they had no idea what they were doing. Having said that, if you were to buy one, you would also fall into that category, just due to your inexperience.

I'm not sure what your intended use for the car is. If it were to be your only means of transportation, it's probably not a good idea unless you have the means to work on it a lot to get it into fair condition. Mine was in pretty good condition after initially overhauling it, and it has been a very dependable driver. But, all I have to do is go through receipts to see just how many parts have been replaced on it over the years. A lot of this is due to normal wear and tear, and some parts have been replaced 2-3 times. Bottom line, they do require quite a bit of work and tinkering over time to keep them on the road. If you aren't pretty mechanically inclined, or willing to get that way pretty fast, it's not a good choice for you.

Others may disagree with me, but that's what I think after owning one for 26 years, and using it as a daily driver the last 15 years.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
thanks
so you guys personally say that its not possible for me to have a mustang while in high school because it is too expensive? btw im definately saving up for a 289 not i6. also holding out for manual transmission.
thanks again
 

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My car cost 6 grand. It had the engine rebuilt and tranny rebuilt 2 years ago and the heads rebuilt in the last year. It is very possible to find a very good running mustang for this money if your willin to deal with some paint and body issues. The interior might need a little work but to redo the upholstery and carpet and stuff isnt too expensive. Im okay because we have 6 working cars in our family, so if i have a problem i can take another car. But if you do routine maintenence and tune ups, you can use a mustang as a daily driver.

I know my stang has been daily driven for the past 2 years by the po and he gave me reciepts with all the maintenence and the only problem really was a couple seals and wheel bearings and a bad voltage regulator. Basically what im trying to say is you can use a vintage stang as a daily driver if your commited to it and most mustang owners are. Search around and you could stumble upon a great deal like i did.
 

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The guy is a car salesman. He can't possibly tell you that you can go buy twice the car for half the price somewhere else and still try to put food on his table.

Both my kids had Mustangs as their daily drivers through high school, and still to this day. My daughter's cost us $1500 about 4 years ago, and my son's $3000 about a year ago (both are '69 coupes and my son's replaced his totalled '65). Over the cours of 4 years, we've replaced quite a few parts on my daughter's car, including the engine.

On my son's $3000 car, so far, we replaced the battery and the power steering pump. He did add his JBA shorty headers and dual exhaust, but it didn't really need it. We also replaced the brake pads (factory power disk brakes) and he added his Keystone Klassic wheels and new Radial T/A tires to replace the biased ply tires that were on it (that's how original his '69 was *LOL*). The car needs some very minor body work and paint and has a rip in the driver's seat on the interior.

Here's a picture of what $3000 can get you in California if you keep your eyes open, search a little (ok, and even get a little lucky, thanks to SacBill finding it):
http://mach1.classic-mustang.net/ForSale/69MustangCoupe/69mustang.jpg

Bottom line, is you can find a very good driver for $5k or less here in California. They will need work from time to time, though, and you need to learn real quick how to do it yourself.
 

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the words of a guy i talked to today that sells 60s mustangs
...an therein lies your answer. As johnpro said, he's a car salesman and car salesman are selling classics for AT LEAST twice the price of a private sale.

Finding a good running solid 'stang that needs a little TLC for 5K shouldn't be tough at all.......
 

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At about your age I bought my first mustang for $1,500, it was a little rough but it got me through college. I didn't know much about fixing them at the time but if you buy a book or two they usually are too difficult to repair. Every car will break down at some point and I found it was much cheaper to fix most parts in an older car then it is a newer one. I even purchased a used 302 for $500 and dropped it in over the weekend once. Plan on spending a little bit of money right after you get one though because there will almost always need to be something done.
 

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I agree with this salesman on some points. Sure my two Mustangs are reliable but I have replaced EVERY MECHANICAL ITEM on them. What are the odds that you are going to find a car like that? In all likelihood you are going to find a car with some new parts and some not-so-new ones. The not-so-new ones will reveal themselves in short order on a daily driver. Even a brand-new vintage Mustang (if such a beast existed) is not going to be as reliable as a Honda because the engineering and manufacturing quality is just not there.

I drove 67-68 Mustangs as daily drivers from 1974-1982. These were typical used cars with 70-100K miles on them. I only got stranded twice during that time, but in order to obtain that reliability record I had to work on them ALL THE TIME. Points, plugs, water pumps, hoses, belts, starters, brakes, etc. You have to be fanatical about preventative maintenance and always carry a fully stocked toolbox in the trunk. I've changed split hoses in the parking lot of an auto parts store, cleaned out carbs on the side of the road, etc.

I'm not trying to scare you but if you think you are going to buy one of these cars and get the reliability of a modern car, think again. And if you have little or no mechanical ability (and don't want to learn) then an old Mustang will nickel and dime you to death with maintenance when you take it to someone else to get it fixed.
 

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The guy is just trying to give you a heads up. I think all he is trying to tell you is that for $5K you will get a car that needs some work. He is probably remembering what it was like when he was 17 (money was scarce, car repairs were unwanted). If you really want a Mustang you could take your $5K & buy a very nice '88-'92 5.0. or consider saving a little bit more & getting a little bit nicer vintage Mustang. I have several vintage Mustangs & some 5.0's even an SVO. The late models are definitely more bang for the buck. They don't have the ooh factor of the vintage cars but they are more reliable on a daily basis. Good luck with your decision.
 

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One point is that a coupe will cost a lot less than a convertable or a fastback. For $5,000 you should be able to find a running coupe. You WON'T however, find a running coupe for $5,000 at dealership; it is going to take some luck, some detective work, and time.

John Harvey
 

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I almost wish I could to it again. I bought mine when I was 17 and drove it as my daily driver for 13 years. What you will want to look for besides rust (or the lack thereof, is a descent engine. By that I mean one that does not require a rebuild right out of the gate. Best way to check for this is to do a compression check. If you find any bad cyclinders, steer clear. The last you want is to have to sink all your $ into the car only to find out that you now need an engine overhaul. Making the initial purchase and rebuilding the enigne are the two most expensive things that you could do to the car (OK I know, a nice paint job is much more, but not on a daily driver.) You probably do not want to start with a rebuild. Most of the rest on the car is somewhat managable, but you should expect to do a lot of work from getting all the bulbs working, fixing leaks, alignments so your tires don't wear out prematurely, oh dang, the ball joint is worn I'll have to replace that first, solving the overheating problem, etc. etc. I would do it all over again in a heartbeat.
Dave
 

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While growing up I watched my father work on cars... most of my life. When I finally turned 16 I got my first car... a 1967 coupe. the 289 ran fine and had great paint all around. The strange thing was it had no rust, even after being driven in ohio. A few years since then I have replaced a thermostat, and a coolant cap. (it runs a bit hot in the summer) The car has never stalled or quit on the road once. It just drinks coolant a bit. my coupe is very reliable. Its my daily driver! I got it for a good price, the same price range you are looking for. Insurance is kind of a lot but thats a sacrifice you have to make!

Yes a car from 1967 may be un-reliable at times... but thats only if you dont give it the care it deserves.

The point is, if you are unsure with your abilities with car care... you may want to wait a few years?

just my $0.02
 
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