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Everyone is forgetting the "Minivan" concept.....probably the first real "Crossover" made... Chrysler made out like a bandit on that one... even though the Minivans had the worst transmissions in the industry and died within a few years...

Rest in peace Lee...

Thanks for the info Rick...

:eek:)

Tony K.





 

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Everyone is forgetting the "Minivan" concept.....probably the first real "Crossover" made... Chrysler made out like a bandit on that one... even though the Minivans had the worst transmissions in the industry and died within a few years...

Rest is peace Lee...

Thanks for the info Rick...

:eek:)

Tony K.

Interesting tidbit - when Chrysler bought AMC, the Minivan concept came with the deal. Yep, AMC had designed the first minivans, but didn't have the funds to execute on production.
 

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Iacocca

I met with Gale Halderman last July 5th, as I passed thru his area. He told me of his recent meeting with Iacocca and that he was not doing well at the time. Gale told us of the early gays of dealing with Ford and how Iacocca and the team had to "manage" things so as to get the mustang approved. Gale did visit him when he could and said Iacocca always lit up when he was there and they had a good time on these visits. I also had the honor of meeting Don Frey at the Ford 100 and listened to his tales of the early mustang days. Both are gone now but the legacy and history they left us will continue on for generations. Their foresight and tribulations to get a car approved that would eventually alter the automotive industry says a lot for the entire team that worked so hard for so many years. I never had the opportunity to meet Mr. Iacocca but I do remember Don telling us of his proudest idea- He came up with marketing mustangs to secretaries! He told me the ladies had bought more mustangs in every year since 1967 and that was what he wanted to be remembered for! For the rest of all of you- try to get near Dayton and visit Gale's museum. It's a visit you will cherish forever~
 

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Interesting tidbit - when Chrysler bought AMC, the Minivan concept came with the deal. Yep, AMC had designed the first minivans, but didn't have the funds to execute on production.
Where did you get this?

Chrysler bought AMC in 1987. The Chrysler minivan debuted in 1984.

The first minivan was Chevrolet Corvair Greenbriar.

Lee Iaccoca did not design the Mustang. Gale Halderman was the chief designer.
 

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I met with Gale Halderman last July 5th, as I passed thru his area. He told me of his recent meeting with Iacocca and that he was not doing well at the time. Gale told us of the early gays of dealing with Ford and how Iacocca and the team had to "manage" things so as to get the mustang approved. Gale did visit him when he could and said Iacocca always lit up when he was there and they had a good time on these visits. I also had the honor of meeting Don Frey at the Ford 100 and listened to his tales of the early mustang days. Both are gone now but the legacy and history they left us will continue on for generations. Their foresight and tribulations to get a car approved that would eventually alter the automotive industry says a lot for the entire team that worked so hard for so many years. I never had the opportunity to meet Mr. Iacocca but I do remember Don telling us of his proudest idea- He came up with marketing mustangs to secretaries! He told me the ladies had bought more mustangs in every year since 1967 and that was what he wanted to be remembered for! For the rest of all of you- try to get near Dayton and visit Gale's museum. It's a visit you will cherish forever~
Have to agree! Was at Gale's museum last Friday with the Fairlane Club of America. Gale was so down-to-earth for a man of his position. Interesting that he said it wasn't himself nor Lee that made the Mustang happen but Hal Sperlich! While there I bought a copy of Gale's new book "Mustang by design". Was the best part of the FCA National Meet.
 

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Where did you get this?

Chrysler bought AMC in 1987. The Chrysler minivan debuted in 1984.

The first minivan was Chevrolet Corvair Greenbriar.

Lee Iaccoca did not design the Mustang. Gale Halderman was the chief designer.

Hmmmm - I will double-check with my source from about 20 years ago, in the meantime take a look at these...


https://books.google.com/books?id=_Vb0AwAAQBAJ&pg=PA204&lpg=PA204&dq=amc+minivan&source=bl&ots=8IO03tth8d&sig=ACfU3U2-RxuU9Npiup60CpnZqgS6d0Mk_A&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiAv4S0lprjAhVFUt8KHWCPAWc4FBDoATAHegQICRAB#v=onepage&q=amc minivan&f=false



https://www.hemmings.com/blog/2014/07/02/amcs-concept-80-am-van-coming-to-kenosha-history-center-in-time-for-2014-kenosha-homecoming/
 

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I was reading up on Lee and only knew of a few of his accomplishments. What a full and productive life and making it to 94 is pretty darn great! RIP.
 

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The first minivan was Chevrolet Corvair Greenbriar.
I'd consider that more of a van but I could see how it could be a mini van of that time as it wasn't as big as the work vans of that period. I thought something like a VW Type II (or "mikerbus" as some of the relatives would call them) would have been the first. I went to Wiki and it said the Stout Scarb from 1936. Huh? 36? Back when they came out no one thought that 50-60 years later people would be collecting them. I wonder if that will be the same in 2040 with a Vintage Dodge Caravan forum. Prolly not...
 

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Hmmmm - I will double-check with my source from about 20 years ago, in the meantime take a look at these...
Cool renderings of the AMC van. Haven't seen that before. The almost look like they could be sold now. They're closer to today's cars than any of the original Iacocca lead minivans. The Voyager and Caravan were released for the 1984 model year and had been in development since the late 70s according to historical press reports at the time. What happened in 85 was Iacocca worked a deal to use excess capacity in the AMC Kenosha plant to produce Chrysler M body vehicles. As mentioned previously the buyout didn't happen until 87 and by then they were selling the heck out of minivans.

Iacocca's genius, though trained as an engineer and started as an engineer, was in sales and marketing. He talks about this quite a bit in his book. He had a knack for what people would buy, he had the chops to know if they could make them inexpensive enough to make money on and could convince people to buy them.
 
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