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Discussion Starter #1
Back in the fall I had the car ('68 Mustang, 390) at the local performance shop, doing the alignment after I'd installed coilovers etc. While there, they noticed the brake booster had a vacuum leak, and ordered in a replacement. By the time it came in, I had the car home for the winter, so just paid for the booster and brought it home. This weekend I've pulled out the old one and started to install the new, but they are not exactly the same. The new part is from Leed Brakes, and is to fit 67 to 69 models.
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As you can see, the pushrod sticks further out of the old one, and a major difference is that the old unit has a rubber seal that a spacer sat over. The spacer is rebated for the seal. The spacer also serves as a vent to allow airflow into the unit. The new unit did not include a spacer.
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Trying to slide the master cylinder over the studs, the spacing is off just a hair. The holes could be opened with a die grinder to make it fit. I noticed that the holes on the old spacer were already oval, and would slide over the studs on the new booster.

So - will this unit work? With the spacer or without? Any guidance from someone who's dealt with this would be really appreciated.

Thanks
Phil. IMG_9409.JPG IMG_9410.JPG IMG_9408.JPG IMG_9412.JPG
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Only the Midland used the spacer.
So you think to hog out my master cylinder mounting holes 'til it fits the studs, and install without spacer? This photo, off the Leeds Brakes site, shows their master cylinder goes on without the spacer.
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This is a real bendix booster. hog out the holes to suit the studs.
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Checkout Chock's method for setting output length.
Leave the booster loose until you get the master on, so that you can angle it.
 
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