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This is the fender apron VIN on a '65 hardtop I saw at a local Cars & Coffee yesterday. Somebody must've had a good reason for drilling, and I thought it interesting enough to take a pic of. Maybe you've seen something like this before but it was a new one on me. The assembly plant, body style, and production numbers were all targeted but I could just make out a C code engine designation. One of those little mysteries that make you wonder if it was legitimately or nefariously done.
 

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Weird for sure. Living in the rust belt I've seen a lot of Mustangs with no VIN due to the apron being replaced but never something like that.
 

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My take is it looks like intentional defacing of the official VIN for which there really is no legitimate reason. Drawing attention to the VIN by damaging it in such an obvious way seems counter intuitive. Then again, some car thieves are far from Rhodes scholars.
 

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I would be very suspicious of this. Looks like a blatant attempt to conceal a possibly stolen or illegally reconstructed car.
That thought had occurred to me. What's more, I looked and saw no evidence it was a replacement apron from another car. Under the sub-par paint job the welds appeared factory all around and original to the front structure. I mean, messing with an official VIN stamp is a big federal no-no, right?
And yet, there it was, somehow legally registered in North Carolina. :shrug:
 

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Could be a number of things as members have posted here. Could have been stolen, or re-titled salvage, or a replaced apron. If it were for sale I'd have to have a very good explanation before I'd touch it.
 

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1) Those drilled holes cost the owner a lot of money as nobody is going to pay top dollar for that. And, what does the numbers on the title say?
2) Did any of those numbers match the door plate? (I know, that can be faked too)
3) Ah, did they do the same thing to the right side hidden numbers?

By the way, we've all seen this: So much paint build up/ body work, it fills all those numbers in the panel where you can't even see any evidence of any numbers in that area.
 

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Someone was testing drill bits to see if they were able to drill through the body. Are there any other places drilled on the car?
 

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My first thought that it's a replacement apron from a donor car, and the VIN is deliberately defaced to ensure it's not being used for title/registration. We've all seen stories where something looks fishy about a VIN on a vehicle displayed at a car show, the numbers get run, and the owner is notified that the car was reported stolen decades ago and it gets seized.
 

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Defacing a VIN , or possessing a car with a defaced VIN can get one arrested in Alabama, probably most places. There's no good reason to test a drill bit there of all places, I don't think any State agency would ever do that, and I'm curious if the numbers match the ones anywhere else on the car. Be very wary.
 

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Not good for sure. I cam across the 65 Coupe that had some collision repair performed in the early 80s and the public VIN did not match the three other hidden stamped VINs (fenders removed). The owner went on to say that they repaired the LH apron using as donor OEM apron that they purchased from a salvage yard. Clearly the public VIN belonged to another car. I walked away before even getting into the paperwork, but could possibly be what happened to the thread starter car. I wish these repairs were handled correctly to eliminate these questionable situations.
 

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Defacing a VIN , or possessing a car with a defaced VIN can get one arrested in Alabama,
Wrong on 17 different levels.

I can deface VIN's all day long, as long as no FRAUD is involved.

So if a person looses control of their car on ice, hits a tree the car is smashed so bad the VIN is damaged, while the driver lays bleeding in the car, the police will cancel the ambulance and cuff them for defacing a VIN?

A person is burning their trash, and accidently sets the grass on fire, and burns up his car, police are going to drag him away in chains for defacing a VIN?

Junk yard operator is crushing junk cars, and a SWAT team descends to send him off to GITMO?

When Unique Performance was busted, the headlines SCREAMED over and over about VIN tampering. Cars were taken down to bare nothings, VINs removed, etc. There was extensive information printed referencing the can and cannots of VIN work.

What does the law say? (Hint: Read the whole section, don't stop at paragraph a 1

18 U.S. Code § 511.Altering or removing motor vehicle identification numbers

(a)A person who
(1)knowingly removes, obliterates, tampers with, or alters an identification number for a motor vehicle or motor vehicle part; or
(2)with intent to further the theft of a motor vehicle, knowingly removes, obliterates, tampers with, or alters a decal or device affixed to a motor vehicle pursuant to the Motor Vehicle Theft Prevention Act,
shall be fined under this title, imprisoned not more than 5 years, or both.

(b) (1)Subsection (a) of this section does not apply to a removal, obliteration, tampering, or alteration by a person specified in paragraph (2) of this subsection (unless such person knows that the vehicle or part involved is stolen).

(2)The persons referred to in paragraph (1) of this subsection are

(A)a motor vehicle scrap processor or a motor vehicle demolisher who complies with applicable State law with respect to such vehicle or part;
(B)a person who repairs such vehicle or part, if the removal, obliteration, tampering, or alteration is reasonably necessary for the repair;
(C)a person who restores or replaces an identification number for such vehicle or part in accordance with applicable State law; and
(D)a person who removes, obliterates, tampers with, or alters a decal or device affixed to a motor vehicle pursuant to the Motor Vehicle Theft Prevention Act, if that person is the owner of the motor vehicle, or is authorized to remove, obliterate, tamper with or alter the decal or device by—
(i)the owner or his authorized agent;
(ii)applicable State or local law; or
(iii)regulations promulgated by the Attorney General to implement the Motor Vehicle Theft Prevention Act.

If it is my car, I can deface to my hearts content, every day, 24 x 7 smack away on the VIN. I probably will never be able to sell the car, but it is mine (Paragraph B(2)D).

It is the same type argument (quote part, but ignore the specifics) when people WAIL that it is illegal to destroy money, put a coin on the railroad tracks, squash it in a machine at the fair, etc.

18 U.S. Code § 331.Mutilation, diminution, and falsification of coins
U.S. Code

Whoever fraudulently alters, defaces, mutilates, impairs, diminishes, falsifies, scales, or lightens any of the coins coined at the mints of the United States, or any foreign coins which are by law made current or are in actual use or circulation as money within the United States; or

Whoever fraudulently possesses, passes, utters, publishes, or sells, or attempts to pass, utter, publish, or sell, or brings into the United States, any such coin, knowing the same to be altered, defaced, mutilated, impaired, diminished, falsified, scaled, or lightened—

Shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than five years, or both.

People refer to this all the time, but leave out the key word FRAUDULENTLY. I can do whatever I want, as long as I do not attempt to FRAUDULENTLY pass it on (cutting a $100 bill into pieces, then taping on parts of a $1 bill to make a pair of $100's)

What the Law States

82.1 Prohibitions.
Except as specifically authorized by the Secretary of the Treasury (or designee) or as otherwise provided in this part, no person shall export, melt, or treat:
(a) Any 5-cent coin of the United States; or
(b) Any one-cent coin of the United States.

Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Title 31, Subtitle B, Chapter 1, Part 82, Section 82.1

Ok, so as we can see here, this is focused on pennies and nickels. This says pretty clearly that you can’t melt down either of these coins. However….

Section 82.2 of that law lists the exceptions. Here’s the one of interest:

(b) The prohibition contained in § 82.1 against the treatment of 5-cent coins and one-cent coins shall not apply to the treatment of these coins for educational, amusement, novelty, jewelry, and similar purposes as long as the volumes treated and the nature of the treatment makes it clear that such treatment is not intended as a means by which to profit solely from the value of the metal content of the coins.
 

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@Mustangerbob1 What's your issue? I said CAN get one arrested, as in yeah, if the intent was to defraud or to conceal the identity of a stolen car...There's a different site for somebody that hates the government.
 

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My best guess. Drivers side replacement apron back in the day when repos were not available. Someone decided to drill holes so as not to record donor apron as the legit apron/registration.

Possibly, owner has multiple pics of the hidden passenger side aprons that verify legitimate VIN numbers that hopefully matches drivers door data plate. I know, driver door data plate is not used for registration purposes, but at least backs up passenger hidden numbers.

Anyone know if you can register a car with hidden VIN numbers on passenger aprons only?
 
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