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Has anyone ever supported a 289/302 with a floor jack? I need to swap out engine mounts and was wondering if I put a 2x6 between the jack and pan if it would survive. I have done this on newer cars with cast aluminum pans, never a stamped steel one.
 

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Prooooooobably would be okay but it's a better idea to support the engine carefully at the edge of the pan where it bolts to the block. Gentle, now, be sure it won't slip off.
 
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I did on my 351C many yrs ago.
 

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I did exactly this a few weeks ago to change my engine mounts. Use a large piece of wood which is large when the oil pan width. Jack up carefully. I secured the engine with a chain in case the floor jack fails.

Lose all bolts before jacking up. Jack up, change mounts and put in the bolts hand tight. Do one side after the other.

It is not very complicated.


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I also just did this about a month ago on my 302 when I changed out my motor mounts. No issues for me.
 

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I'm the other way round, steel pans don't worry me at all, it's the cast ones that worry me. But I support both regularly anyway with a piece of wood as a cushion.
 
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I have done it with my 390 several times with no worry at all. I put 1/4" sheet rubber and a thick rag on the jack. My floor jack has a large pad. Like GypsyR said, cast would worry me a lot more.
 

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Has anyone ever supported a 289/302 with a floor jack? I need to swap out engine mounts and was wondering if I put a 2x6 between the jack and pan if it would survive. I have done this on newer cars with cast aluminum pans, never a stamped steel one.
DO NOT JACK THE ENGINE UP BY OIL PAN!!!! Some on here are saying to put a 2x4 on oil pan, do not do this! First off because of oil pump to pan clearance and second because some oil pans have baffles in the and you can push it up into the crank, then when you go to start the car it will sound like a rod knock. I had to change a pan for a friend on his foxbody because of this exact issue, it dented the pan up slightly and caused the crank to hit the baffles.

the only way to do this is either put a 2x4 on the rail where the oil pan bolts to block on one side Jack it up change mount then the other, or get a shock tower cradle to support from above and do both at the same time.
 

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Prooooooobably would be okay but it's a better idea to support the engine carefully at the edge of the pan where it bolts to the block. Gentle, now, be sure it won't slip off.
This is exactly what needs done do not support engine on the oil pan, terrible advice from the rest.
 

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DO NOT JACK THE ENGINE UP BY OIL PAN!!!! Some on here are saying to put a 2x4 on oil pan, do not do this! First off because of oil pump to pan clearance and second because some oil pans have baffles in the and you can push it up into the crank, then when you go to start the car it will sound like a rod knock. I had to change a pan for a friend on his foxbody because of this exact issue, it dented the pan up slightly and caused the crank to hit the baffles.

the only way to do this is either put a 2x4 on the rail where the oil pan bolts to block on one side Jack it up change mount then the other, or get a shock tower cradle to support from above and do both at the same time.
Oh, please. If everything is disconnected and you're careful, you won't damage the pan. Use the widest piece of lumber you can find, but a 2x4 will do in a pinch.
 

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I use a 2 x 12 precisely to avoid pushing up the pan into the pickup or causing any interference with a windage tray etc

. Like everything else on life, use a little common sense you’ll never have a problem. don’t put your wood block in the center of the oil pan where it’s most likely to be deformed.

some people can work on cars and some can’t. If you dent up an oil pan then you are likely in the latter group

millions of oil pans have been used properly as a location to jack up the engine slightly. There’s nothing wrong with that if you use your head.
I see this thread going south as people make a mountain out of a molehill.

Z
 

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I use a 2 x 12 precisely to avoid pushing up the pan into the pickup or causing any interference with a windage tray etc

. Like everything else on life, use a little common sense you’ll never have a problem. don’t put your wood block in the center of the oil pan where it’s most likely to be deformed.

some people can work on cars and some can’t. If you dent up an oil pan then you are likely latter group

millions of oil pans have been used properly as a location to jack up the engine slightly. There’s nothing wrong with that if you use your head.
I see this thread going south as people make a mountain out of a molehill.

Z
If you had a aftermarket oilpan thats solid sure, but usually on older cars and several thousand heat cycles the metal gets more malleable, Is it really worth finding out when its too malleable to slightly denting it up? I know from experience on the one I had to change, it didnt take much, could hardly even notice it was pushed up. So why not just do the smart thing and stick to the oil pan rails under the block, you cant mess anything up with that
 

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. “.......So why not just do the smart thing and stick to the oil pan rails under the block, you cant mess anything up with that
thanks for the pointers, I really don’t know how I’ve managed all these 50+ years under cars to avoid disaster, not doing the “smart thing” but I’ll just muddle on thru life and continue doing things the wrong way that’s working just fine.

Z
 

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We don't hafta get chippy!
I would prefer to use the rails, but a board to disperse the load will work in most cases for a temporary lift. We've all probably done things that may be contrary to ideal, with some risk of damage, even injury (I make a good living doing dangerous stuff most would never wanna do). And somehow, it worked out that one time or hundreds of times. Or not. Whatever.
Excuse me while I start my car by crossing two wrenches across the solenoid and set the float on a running 4100 then drop my trans in drive with the rear axle on a pair of Harbor Freight jack stands to see if my parking brake will hold on my original drums...
Ideally I would lift my car by a @zray crossmember, start it with a bump switch, set the float with a Plasti-gauge, and I could inspect or maintain my car from beneath with a new hydraulic lift. I'm sticking by my 4100 and rear drums.
 
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thanks for the pointers, I really don’t know how I’ve managed all these 50+ years under cars to avoid disaster, not doing the “smart thing” but I’ll just muddle on thru life and continue doing things the wrong way that’s working just fine.

Z
You do you, Ill stick to doing it the correct way and never risking my $20k engine in the process. But by all means, your way seems to work, until it doesnt. Ive personally seen a few oil pans ruined and pushed into the pump or crank. So whats the point, sure you can get away with doing it, but if someone has had an oil pan do that, that means theres a chance for it to happen. Where as doing it in on the rails has a 0% chance to ruin the pan of cause motor damage. Again, I was there when my friend started his car up unknown to me that he jacked the motor up with a 2x4 on the oil pan and I intially thought a rod broke, as it was the crank coming around hitting the baffle inside the oil pan. That was my first experience with it and was enough to say “why would I ever do it this way regardless if it could work fine”. I bought a engine cradle for $100 at harbor freight and hold it from the top. I have a solid moroso oil pan on mine, and still wouldnt chance it just in case, but again you do you. Im just trying to let the OP know there are risks of doing it wrong, end of story.
 

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it and was enough to say “why would I ever do it thi
Has anyone ever supported a 289/302 with a floor jack? I need to swap out engine mounts and was wondering if I put a 2x6 between the jack and pan if it would survive. I have done this on newer cars with cast aluminum pans, never a stamped steel one.
So sounds like, in summation, yes you can do it this way with a slight risk.
 
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I've done it with a 302 and a 2x6 as well. I've always tried to spread out the load as best as I can. Inspect it after you finish to check for any damage.

Now-a-days I use an engine hoist.
 
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