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I have a threaded plug on my thermostat housing... good or bad place for an electric fan temp sensor? My 66, which has a 302 in it, has an Edelbrock Performer intake - there are only 2 ports on the front, one I am using for the engine temp sensor, the other is one of the heater hoses. So, I'm trying to figure on a place for my new electric fan sensor.... I've seen some pics on the 'net where others have used this for their fan sensor, wanted to see what my VMF brothers have to say.... I have no ports on the radiator, neither on the top or bottom. The radiator/fan manufacturer says top/front of the motor. I haven't gotten an answer about the thermostat housing from them yet. I'm using this setup:
1964 - 1966 Mustang Aluminum Radiator 3300 CFM FAN AND ALUMINUM SHROUD
When I bought the radiator they didn't have the fan configuration, so when I went to their page to point another Mustanger to their radiators, I noticed they now pair them up with fans. I called and got a matching fan ordered, now wanting to hook it up of course!
 

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Since I've had two sensors fail I eschew them. Plus its nice to be able to turn the fan off when you want to listen to other things.
I have my extra gauge sensor there and though it lags slightly at first once its up to temp and since I have a small hole in the t-stat it is always in the hottest water. Having the sensor in the t-stat house isn't a horrible idea as long as its all run off a switched relay so that the fan doesn't keep going long after the engine is shut off.
I let my fan run a bit after shut down thinking that its still cooling and shrinking water and so maybe its still taking heat away from the engine.
 

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If I was ever going to install an electric cooling fan in a vintage Mustang....... well, for those of you who know me you already KNOW that ain't going to happen.... but say I DID want to do it... I'd have a bung soldered into my top tank and put it there.
 

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If I was ever going to install an electric cooling fan in a vintage Mustang....... well, for those of you who know me you already KNOW that ain't going to happen.
Right there with you on this one Bart! It's a vintage Mustang not a new whatever. Yea I've got EFI, blame that on the non attainment summer blend gas. I remember the first time I heard a muscle car park with an electric fan humming loudly ......
 

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Right there with you on this one Bart! It's a vintage Mustang not a new whatever. Yea I've got EFI, blame that on the non attainment summer blend gas. I remember the first time I heard a muscle car park with an electric fan humming loudly ......[/QUOTE

Ive never heard anyone say "I can't tune my fan properly because...."
 

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If I was ever going to install an electric cooling fan in a vintage Mustang....... well, for those of you who know me you already KNOW that ain't going to happen.... but say I DID want to do it... I'd have a bung soldered into my top tank and put it there.
From a purely analytical point of view, the temperature sensor should be in the bottom of the radiator (the outlet) so it knows when the coolant is not being cooled by the air flow. That’s when the fan should kick on, not when the coolant leaving the engine reaches a specific temperature. I remember seeing one company having such an arrangement for their fan controller, but I don’t remember the name.
From a practical view, a sensor at the outlet will suffice. I’d use a sensor that kicks in just past the temperature that your thermostat fully opens (which is not the temperature rating of the thermostat).
 

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From a purely analytical point of view, the temperature sensor should be in the bottom of the radiator (the outlet) so it knows when the coolant is not being cooled by the air flow. That’s when the fan should kick on, not when the coolant leaving the engine reaches a specific temperature. I remember seeing one company having such an arrangement for their fan controller, but I don’t remember the name.
From a practical view, a sensor at the outlet will suffice. I’d use a sensor that kicks in just past the temperature that your thermostat fully opens (which is not the temperature rating of the thermostat).
https://www.autocoolguy.com/
 

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From a purely analytical point of view, the temperature sensor should be in the bottom of the radiator (the outlet) so it knows when the coolant is not being cooled by the air flow. That’s when the fan should kick on, not when the coolant leaving the engine reaches a specific temperature. I remember seeing one company having such an arrangement for their fan controller, but I don’t remember the name.
From a practical view, a sensor at the outlet will suffice. I’d use a sensor that kicks in just past the temperature that your thermostat fully opens (which is not the temperature rating of the thermostat).
I get the analytical logic, but thinking more, I am less concerned with the temp of the water exiting the radiator than I am the water exiting the engine as that is a better gauge of the temperature of the engine. It is the temperature of the engine that I am trying to regulate. For the sensor at the radiator outlet to accomplish desired engine temp, one would have to figure out the heat gain by the time the coolant exits the engine. That heat gain will vary depending on the load on the engine, thus the sensor may not be at the right temp for all conditions.

Yes, temp of sensor should be higher than the thermostat to allow thermostat to fully open and give the radiator a chance to work before adding more air.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Well, old car or what, i've had some semblance of a heating issue for years and i'm sick of it. I live in the hot, Florida climate... I put the ECP radiator on and it was working fine, but when I tried to go with a group of old Mustangs down the beach road, I was the only car that started to heat. Every single one of the owners of the cars said the same thing - "get an electric fan for crying out loud". The local Mustang club said the same thing. So, I want to drive the thing with some expectation of it keeping cool.
Putting EFI on a car is different from changing the fan how? LOL! Just kidding Nailbender! I'm all for keeping them original but I want to get her out of the garage!
 

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From a purely analytical point of view, the temperature sensor should be in the bottom of the radiator (the outlet) so it knows when the coolant is not being cooled by the air flow. That’s when the fan should kick on, not when the coolant leaving the engine reaches a specific temperature. I remember seeing one company having such an arrangement for their fan controller, but I don’t remember the name.
From a practical view, a sensor at the outlet will suffice. I’d use a sensor that kicks in just past the temperature that your thermostat fully opens (which is not the temperature rating of the thermostat).

Autocoolguy is the only one I've seen use the outlet.

https://www.autocoolguy.com/

I have their setup controlling the fans on my 65's dual contour setup. It's fantastic (see what I did there?)
 

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Enjoy.

To the naysayers, yes the whine of the fan kind of sucks, but it is nice to idle through a cruise scenario without overheating. I expect most people have modified their cars in one way or another (got radial tires on yours?) so to each his own.
 

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In our 66 289 I am running a 2700 cfm Spal puller fan behind an aluminum radiator with the sensor located at the top of the thermostat housing.
Have 9k on this setup with no heating issues whatsoever.
Fan tends to spin free at speed, only is energized in traffic and when at a stop.
It does run when first parked for 4 to 5 minutes, not an issue for me.

I will get a pic of it to you tonight.
 

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Enjoy.

To the naysayers, yes the whine of the fan kind of sucks, but it is nice to idle through a cruise scenario without overheating. I expect most people have modified their cars in one way or another (got radial tires on yours?) so to each his own.
I may have poked a little fun but I totally get the attraction of an electric fan. At the Hoosier Challenge autocross this past weekend the lack of a huge aluminum radiator and electric fan was the second most asked question. First being the SoT front coilover setup. I have no cooling issues even with the stock C code 4 blade fan on a 331 I can idle in the driveway on a 90º+ day for a half hour without going over 195º on the FiTech handheld display. With 10 minutes between runs I was at 192º at launch and the temperature dropped during the run even while buzzing the motor over 6K. I realize this is unusual but offer that a big aluminum radiator with an electric fan may cure the symptom without getting to the root of the problem. It's possible when the cheap 3 row China radiator that was on the car when I bought it fails I may reconsider things.
 

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PS As I've "said" in other posts, my all-original cooling system works just fine in my 68 390 even sitting in traffic in 95F temps. That includes stock radiator, shroud, fan & clutch, and water pump. And as others have said, the original systems worked just fine when these cars were built. If you have over heating issues it may be due to modifications (adding heat) or parts that are past their prime. However, next to wiring issues overheating seems to be at or near the top of the list of problems being addressed here.
Good luck addressing the problem.
 
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