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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hey there VMF. I'm new to the forums and do apologize upfront about this being my 1st post. I've been an owner in the past of several classic Mustangs including a '64 1/2 260/4 coupe, '66 Fastback, '67 Coupe (my 1st), '69 Mach 1, and '71 Mach 1. However, it's been more than 20 years since a Mustang has graced our garage.

Now to the question regarding your opinions on the long-term demand for tribute cars.... ;) An opportunity has presented itself to pick up a very nicely done and maintained '66 GT350 clone/tribute. It's been assembled with as many Shelby-correct parts as possible to keep it as close to what a '66 Shelby would have been outside of a built motor (still carbureted), T5 conversion, and upgraded brakes. The car was originally a C code automatic fastback that underwent a complete restoration with the modifications about 15 years ago. It's only racked up a few thousand miles since completion and the owner who has had it during this time is ready to sell. The price is in the mid 40K range which seems about market for the car.

Do you guys see demand dropping off significantly for nicely executed tribute cars in the near future? In general, demand for classic ICE cars seems to be in a strange place at the moment. At first glance, the aging of the general demographics for classic Mustang owners (demand) and the overall robust supply of 65-66 Mustangs seems to be a recipe for flattening prices.

Perhaps I'm overthinking this and should just purchase the car to drive and enjoy and not worry about the other side. However, I have a bad habit of considering exit strategies on larger purchases and want to understand how difficult something could be to find a new home for it in case they don't deliver to expectations. I've had numerous cars in the past that were easy to buy and hard to sell. ;) Not looking for another one.

Thanks for listening (reading?) and for your perspectives and opinions.

Best Regards from Texas!

2cam
 

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With the unreachable (for most) prices of true 65/66 Shelbys the tribute cars when nicely done should continue to fetch good money. Seems like if it wasn't for clones we wouldn't be seeing any gt350s... I love a nice Shelby tribute...I never get caught up in all the "everything has to be exact" either..just cool cars...
 

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It seems these days that any nicely done fastback is easily over $40K anyways, so if it's truly as nice as you say, I don't see a whole lot of downside risk (at least for the next several years).
 

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Discussion Starter #6
That is a pricey Tribute, should be perfect - but if you keep it for a while, it will hold its value...
With the unreachable (for most) prices of true 65/66 Shelbys the tribute cars when nicely done should continue to fetch good money. Seems like if it wasn't for clones we wouldn't be seeing any gt350s... I love a nice Shelby tribute...I never get caught up in all the "everything has to be exact" either..just cool cars...
Thanks for the responses so far and the great perspectives.

It seems these days that any nicely done fastback is easily over $40K anyways, so if it's truly as nice as you say, I don't see a whole lot of downside risk (at least for the next several years).
It does seem that way looking at comps that have sold on BaT over the last two years. I kinda wish that the car had been completed without the Shelby tribute/homage thing - just a nice, clean, intelligently modded fastback instead.

Short answer, no. Demand for such a car won’t drop off. And yes, you’re over thinking it. :)
That's what I thought. ;)

2cam
 

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The price for tributes will follow the price trend of the original. Original goes up, tribute goes up, but NOT at the same rate. One thing that could change that is that as the people of the age to remember a particular vintage car from their youth age and can no longer drive those cars, the demand may drop off. In that case the originals may hold their value with collector, but all others may see a decline in demand from the general public.
 

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One thing that could change that is that as the people of the age to remember a particular vintage car from their youth age and can no longer drive those cars, the demand may drop off. In that case the originals may hold their value with collector, but all others may see a decline in demand from the general public.
This. I think as the generation that remembers using Mustangs as everyday transportation and family cars starts passing on, I also wonder what that will bring for future interest. But then I look at my car and say oh well, I sure as hell am just going to enjoy this car every chance I get.
778822
 

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This. I think as the generation that remembers using Mustangs as everyday transportation and family cars starts passing on, I also wonder what that will bring for future interest. But then I look at my car and say oh well, I sure as hell am just going to enjoy this car every chance I get. View attachment 778822
Looks great! Let’s see more pics


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Looks great! Let’s see more pics


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Thanks for the kind words. My car photographs well, but up close very easy to see its a driver not a show car. It's been almost 30 years since it was painted.
778834
778838
 

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In my opinion the clones or shelby inspired restomods make for some great looking cars.. they just look right. As a gt350 with modern wheels is what we see a lot. They are drive-able and most of them can out perform the real shelby as well. I don't see any down side too them, and i look at restomods more valuable vs. when the car was in it's stock T, C A code configuration.. goes for coupes as well
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Restomodding will continue well into the future:




I can see this happening and becoming more common. There was a movie in the mid/late 90s called "Gattaca" whose central theme was eugenics and its impact on future society. One of the interesting side details of the film was the wide-spread use of classic cars (or at least classicly styled) that used electric drivetrains. It seems a bit prophetic looking back at it now.
I'm still building mine...mine is definitely restomodded...as usual... View attachment 778816 View attachment 778817 View attachment 778818
Incredible! That looks like it's going to be insane.

This. I think as the generation that remembers using Mustangs as everyday transportation and family cars starts passing on, I also wonder what that will bring for future interest. But then I look at my car and say oh well, I sure as hell am just going to enjoy this car every chance I get. View attachment 778822

View attachment 778838
Beautiful car and great perspective!

In my opinion the clones or shelby inspired restomods make for some great looking cars.. they just look right. As a gt350 with modern wheels is what we see a lot. They are drive-able and most of them can out perform the real shelby as well. I don't see any down side too them, and i look at restomods more valuable vs. when the car was in it's stock T, C A code configuration.. goes for coupes as well
Thanks for the perspective. Over the last 10 years or so, I've been involved with air-cooled Porsches. The clone/tribute movement in that community has been huge. However, it's become a bit over-saturated with backdated examples and Carrera/Carrera RS clones (essentially the GT350 of the air-cooled 911 world). Nice, original (or well restored, stock config) lower-spec examples are pulling the bigger dollars now and holding their value where tributes have eroded a touch.

Different markets of course, but there do seem to be some similarities.

Thanks for all of your opinions so far.

2cam
 

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+6 on what everyone has said. A well built GT350 clone may get as much attention as the real thing. Many folks who have looked at my 66 clone have asked "is it a real one". If you really like the car, and it's in great shape, go for it. Just make sure of the condition.
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“......Many folks who have looked at my 66 clone have asked "is it a real one". .......”
When I was driving my ‘66 Shelbys every day, the first words out of someone’s mouth was, “nice car”.

Always followed by, “is it a real Shelby” ?

If it doesn’t bother a person to have to truthfully say, “no, it isn’t a real Shelby”, over and over, & every time you have the car in public view, then go for it. I would think that would get on a person’s nerves. Thankfully I was always able to answer in the affirmative.

It seems to me to be a much better alternative to drive a Mustang that looks like a Mustang; a car that is magnificent on its own merits, than it is to drive a fake Shelby. A car that is always calling attention to itself as being such.

Z
 

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When I was driving my ‘66 Shelbys every day, the first words out of someone’s mouth was, “nice car”.

Always followed by, “is it a real Shelby” ?

If it doesn’t bother a person to have to truthfully say, “no, it isn’t a real Shelby”, over and over, & every time you have the car in public view, then go for it. I would think that would get on a person’s nerves. Thankfully I was always able to answer in the affirmative.

It seems to me to be a much better alternative to drive a Mustang that looks like a Mustang; a car that is magnificent on its own merits, than it is to drive a fake Shelby. A car that is always calling attention to itself as being such.

Z
As a long time owner of a clone/replica/tribute whatever one wants to call them, it does not bother me one little bit when I have to respond that no, it's not a real one. Truth be told, I hardly ever get that question any more. 25 years ago I heard that question much more. Would I love to have a real Shelby? Hell yes. But I've had 25 years and counting of driving pleasure and memories, and how do you put a price on that?
 

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Keep in mind that market trends have changed over the years and may continue to change when it comes to clones. It wasn't that many years ago that the purists in the hobby were singing "original", "original", "original" and any modifications from stock was seen as heresy. Demand and prices reflected this. Over time tastefully modified cars began making an inroad into the Mustang market as reflected in the fact that even MCA recognizes "Modified" in their judging classes. Whether this is a pendulum that will eventually swing back the other way is beyond the ability of my crystal ball. You will always be able to sell it. It might be for a profit or a loss. Roll the dice and enjoy the ride!!
 

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