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When I was driving my ‘66 Shelbys every day, the first words out of someone’s mouth was, “nice car”.

Always followed by, “is it a real Shelby” ?

If it doesn’t bother a person to have to truthfully say, “no, it isn’t a real Shelby”, over and over, & every time you have the car in public view, then go for it. I would think that would get on a person’s nerves. Thankfully I was always able to answer in the affirmative.

It seems to me to be a much better alternative to drive a Mustang that looks like a Mustang; a car that is magnificent on its own merits, than it is to drive a fake Shelby. A car that is always calling attention to itself as being such.

Z
I agree with this. I don't want a Shelby unless it's a Shelby. I would rather not have to say no every time in get asked "is it real". Build some elements that made the GT 350s cool into the car, but don't go all out copy. Make it yours and enjoy it. However I know not everyone thinks this way. It really only matters to you and how you feel about it. Everyone on here has an opinion. If you want a Shelby you got three choices buy a real one, buy an all ready made tribute, or make one yourself. Any of them will cost you a good chunk of change. I am of the opinion that cars are meant to be driven. I drive my 65 coupe all the time. I feel there are enough period correct 1965 C Code coupes out there. Many just sit in garages and come out every once in awhile. I would rather enjoy my car by driving it. Part of that is using new technologies that exist to try extract all the performance I can out of it. Does everyone agree with my choices no. But in the end it's my car and it's my enjoyment not thiers.
 

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Saw video a little while back. A guy had a 69 body placed on top of a late model mustang. At first glance it looks like a 69 but then the more you look at it the more there is something different. Pop the hood or open the doors it's all modern mustang. Very well done.
 

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When I started the "voodoo" project I didn't realize how busy the shop builds would get...going to get it done for spring tho...
When I started my Coyote powered Boss 302 replica several years ago now, I did not realize how long it would take or how much it would cost.
I am envious you will have yours done in the Spring, I figure 3 years left to go on mine.
The one thing I did not see mentioned regarding a tribute, yeah they are not "real", but I am not sure I would be willing to drive a real one line I would like to either. I built a Factory Five Cobra for the driving experience, not to own a collectible. Driving is the real joy, not bragging about the car being real.
 

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“.....The one thing I did not see mentioned regarding a tribute, yeah they are not "real", but I am not sure I would be willing to drive a real one line I would like to either. I built a Factory Five Cobra for the driving experience, not to own a collectible. Driving is the real joy, not bragging about the car being real.
The car does the bragging without the owner needing to say much of anything beyond saying “yes”. Does a simple “yes it’s a real one” qualify as bragging ? Someone else will have to answer that.

As far as driving the wheels off of the real thing, everyone I know who has ownership of genuine Shelby’s, has at some point driven them to the limit, and beyond. Most owners drove them regularly if not every day. The cars beg to be driven, and I know of few owners that decline the call to do so.

I never worried a single second about damaging the car when driving. I’m paying Hagerty to do the worrying for me, so let them do it and I’ll do the enjoying.

Z

PS
And there is a good sized group of owners vintage racing their Shelbys, and original Cobras, Anyone who’s seen these races knows that after the starting flag drops everyone is trying to win and driving to the limits to do so.
 

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Discussion Starter #27
+6 on what everyone has said. A well built GT350 clone may get as much attention as the real thing. Many folks who have looked at my 66 clone have asked "is it a real one". If you really like the car, and it's in great shape, go for it. Just make sure of the condition.
View attachment 778879
Sharp car!

When I was driving my ‘66 Shelbys every day, the first words out of someone’s mouth was, “nice car”.

Always followed by, “is it a real Shelby” ?

If it doesn’t bother a person to have to truthfully say, “no, it isn’t a real Shelby”, over and over, & every time you have the car in public view, then go for it. I would think that would get on a person’s nerves. Thankfully I was always able to answer in the affirmative.

It seems to me to be a much better alternative to drive a Mustang that looks like a Mustang; a car that is magnificent on its own merits, than it is to drive a fake Shelby. A car that is always calling attention to itself as being such.

Z
I feel the same way which may really be driving a bit of my concern. The car is a well-executed example. To me, it would be more attractive as a modded fastback that was standing on its own merits as opposed to copying a Shelby. However, there's nothing wrong with Shelby clones. We just all have different preferences.

I agree with this. I don't want a Shelby unless it's a Shelby. I would rather not have to say no every time in get asked "is it real". Build some elements that made the GT 350s cool into the car, but don't go all out copy. Make it yours and enjoy it. However I know not everyone thinks this way. It really only matters to you and how you feel about it. Everyone on here has an opinion. If you want a Shelby you got three choices buy a real one, buy an all ready made tribute, or make one yourself. Any of them will cost you a good chunk of change. I am of the opinion that cars are meant to be driven. I drive my 65 coupe all the time. I feel there are enough period correct 1965 C Code coupes out there. Many just sit in garages and come out every once in awhile. I would rather enjoy my car by driving it. Part of that is using new technologies that exist to try extract all the performance I can out of it. Does everyone agree with my choices no. But in the end it's my car and it's my enjoyment not thiers.
Agree 100%. I'm going to look at the car again this week and talk further with the owner. Maybe I'll fall in love with the car and it won't bother me that it's a Shelby tribute.

Keep in mind that market trends have changed over the years and may continue to change when it comes to clones. It wasn't that many years ago that the purists in the hobby were singing "original", "original", "original" and any modifications from stock was seen as heresy. Demand and prices reflected this. Over time tastefully modified cars began making an inroad into the Mustang market as reflected in the fact that even MCA recognizes "Modified" in their judging classes. Whether this is a pendulum that will eventually swing back the other way is beyond the ability of my crystal ball. You will always be able to sell it. It might be for a profit or a loss. Roll the dice and enjoy the ride!!
This statement pretty much sums it up, doesn't it? ;)

2cam
 

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Adding my 2c - I am lucky to have both, the Shelby was first and I do love driving it but also not too keen on breaking it either - so its reserved for the "sunday drive" and club meets. The red one came a little later when I wanted to have some fun on the track and/or with some mods - I know people race their Shelby's but that's not for me (taking out a VIN stamped front guard would hurt) so wanted something that could be tinkered with without worrying about originality.

Mate - buy what you love, don't look at it as an investment - drive, enjoy etc. And rest easy knowing (and being completely biased here) that there is not a better looking car than a 65/66 FB in the entire Mustang/Shelby lineup

No idea on future values, I do think it is true that the core group of fans are getting older and less in number and I suspect we are probably approaching peak for values over the next few years, that typically means rarer and better qual examples become more attractive (but that's a guess - I think the restmod scene will be the one to watch here in terms of keeping them relevant, look forward to seeing similar running gear from a Plaid in a classic :))
779306
 

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Adding my 2c - I am lucky to have both, the Shelby was first and I do love driving it but also not too keen on breaking it either - so its reserved for the "sunday drive" and club meets. The red one came a little later when I wanted to have some fun on the track and/or with some mods - I know people race their Shelby's but that's not for me (taking out a VIN stamped front guard would hurt) so wanted something that could be tinkered with without worrying about originality.

Mate - buy what you love, don't look at it as an investment - drive, enjoy etc. And rest easy knowing (and being completely biased here) that there is not a better looking car than a 65/66 FB in the entire Mustang/Shelby lineup

No idea on future values, I do think it is true that the core group of fans are getting older and less in number and I suspect we are probably approaching peak for values over the next few years, that typically means rarer and better qual examples become more attractive (but that's a guess - I think the restmod scene will be the one to watch here in terms of keeping them relevant, look forward to seeing similar running gear from a Plaid in a classic :))
View attachment 779306
They are both beautiful cars! Would love to know more about them.
 

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My $0.02 is that no restomod or tribute car should be seen as an investment, leave that realm to collectors, auctioneers, and authentic specimens.

Tribute cars are meant to be enjoyed, driven (hard sometimes) and taken to shows. That they hold value better than a 2021 Camry is just a bonus, not a purpose.
 

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If I could find a 66 fastback, I would absolutely make it a Shelby tribute, just because I want one, and I will never afford a real one. But I'm a fan of 'original looking' with some tasteful modern upgrades, at least that's what I'm going for with my coupe.
 

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I am a long time owner of real Shelbys (17 in all over the years) I am down to one now. Most of you don't realize these were ALL we had back in the day and they were not THAT valuable! It was common to see a Shelby or two any given day! The one I have kept for 47 years is one I paid $1,000 for in '74.Today with inflation that might be $20,000. If it weren't for the "collector interest" of Mustangs in general , that "could have been" it's current worth. Fortunately for me demand is high and supply limited to less than 2,378 originally built in '66. It doesn't drive different than a similarly equipped clone "could". IN FACT, a clone "could" be made to drive BETTER since concern for "originality" could be ignored. Since I drag race my GT350H a Dynacorn NEW car would actually be a smarter choice over 55 year old sheet metal. The dilemma is in the cost to duplicate what I have already. The Dynacorn is "around" 20,000 give or take. If I pay someone to do the conversion and buy duplicate parts to my '66, I could easily have near $100,000 in a turnkey replacement that "might" be worth 40-50 because it IS a clone. Smart , no. SAFER hell yes. Sure I could sell it now , build the clone and put over 100,000 in the bank but holding on until it climbs higher in value makes more sense. for now the "plan" is to evaluate things when I turn 80 in 12 years. Hopefully the younger people will still value the cars then. Time will tell.
Randy
 

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Man, glad I asked. I couldn't guess it and felt like I had missed something. Thanks!
You bet. Only reason I knew was a coworker with a Tesla throws that term around all the time when he's ragging on anything non-EV.
 

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They are both beautiful cars! Would love to know more about them.
The Shelby is ex Portland Hertz but has been in Australia for many years (interesting side fact, in AU we have quite a bit of tax on bringing in a car from overseas - for anything over about $US 54k you pay a "luxury car tax" of 33% - yep, for every $3 over the limit you give the gov. $1 - on top of that there is also a 10% goods tax. It is bloody robbery and was designed to protect the local car industry which no longer exists? - that is why once an expensive car is in AU, it generally stays).

The red one is the fun car, I imported that from LA a few years ago ($US 30k from memory, was on ebay) - its a late 64 A-Code that is slowly being turned into a R-code tribute - had a stroker, 5 spd, cage, fuel cell etc when I got it and I have just finished doing the brakes (and that is another story, the idiot doing the measuring [me] mucked up and now the car wears 16" rims to fit over the rotors) , next is front suspension - not sure what to do here, has the shelby drop and lowered 620lbs but I like the idea of lower and adjustability, thinking QA1's (not sure, need to read more on the forum). Idea of this car is that I can do more of the work myself, learn, play etc - does not get out as much as I would like, long term plan is to look at some tarmac rally stuff. It was actually my 2nd choice - I was looking at a current CVAR car (very nice R-code tribute) but the selling agent was a bit dodgy and by the time I got hold of the owner (nice guy) he already had an offer. So, you think finding/buying the right car is hard stateside, try doing it 10k mile away - involves a lot of trust, so far no issues

Back to the clone discussion - I obviously have no issues with a tribute/clone etc, you never try and pass it off as the real deal of course
 

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I honestly prefer the term tribute. As most aren't exactly clones, seeing as they started life as T or C code machines and not K's like the originals and usually have modern updates (thank goodness) so people can drive and enjoy them as so many others here have stated.

I initially tried to keep my '65 A code coupe period looking... and now thats gone out the window as I like to drive it, and I drive it A LOT! Do whatever makes you happy. Do what you enjoy with it.

A clone/tribute/whatever, if in reasonable shape will always have the intrinsic value of a fastback or thereabouts. Which is always more than a coupe. Hard to go wrong! However, when I was looking it seemed that quite a few of the ones that were only done to driver/average standards were worth a bit less. I almost considered buying a red/white striped '66 and taking off all the fibreglass bits and putting the proper non black interior in it. But I'm weird like that!
 
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