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Discussion Starter #1
Quick question, is there a trick to getting the splined bolts back on the lower control arm? I can get them just about all the way on but there is still a slight gap between the bolt head and the lower control arm.

Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Yes sir, those are them. I got them in most of the way, still got about 1/8" to 1/4" gap from the bolt head to the control arm. Can't seem to get them down any further.
 

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Can you post a pic? I'm having a hard time visualizing what's going on. IMG_20160312_104139718_HDR.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Here's a pic of them installed on my LCAs. Not entirely sure if they are original or not, they are what I removed from my previous LCAs.
747828
 

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You need to take the strut rod back off and either press or drive the splined bolts down flush with the top surface. A shop press is the ideal tool, but a solid surface and a large punch with encouragement from a BFH works too.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Driving it like this to a shop to have it done there not encouraged? Thoughts on putting a washer/spacer to fill the gap? Or does it need to sit flush to prevent anything bad from happening?
 

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If you did the work, just take them back off do what needs to be done. Not sure why you need to pay someone to do this. If you paid to have the strut rods installed, then whoever did that work needs to fix it at no charge. Something I forgot to mention is that you can use your shop vise as a "press" of sorts. Put a deepwell socket as a receiver to protect the threaded side.
 

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If you already have the control arm installed put a deep well socket on the bottom side of the bolt (thread side) make sure that it’s a deep enough and large enough diameter deep well so that it doesn’t damage your threads.. on the top side the hex head side use a C clamp and you may need to use a short piece of pipe for leverage and press it in.
I want to say that it is recommended when those strut rod splind bolts are removed from the lower control arm that they are not reused as sometimes the spline is worn and they may have a tendency to spin on the lower control arm instead of a interference fit engagament. they are pricey I got mine through a NPD
 

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Discussion Starter #12
So i tried the c clamp route and those things didn't budge. If everything is installed, is there a way to remove the lower control arm and strut rod without having to remove the rotor, shock, spring, etc? I'm hoping to pull it out, take it to a shop to get pressed and then put it back it without stripping everything out.
 

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Just take the strut off and take short piece pipe and slip over the bolt threads and rest the other end on the ground and hit the bolt with a heavy hammer. Right now you don't have a good way to back it up solid and you don't have a straight shot to hit it hard enough. You can have the strut rod off in just a few minutes.
 

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U also could torque it down with the nuts on the bottom side of the control alarm by using an impact but carefully watch the head of each bolt. Once it’s seated you don’t want it to start spinning because then you defeated the whole purpose of that splined shaft..
 

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I'd be concerned using an impact driver. Chance you might snap the bolts. You can remove the strut rod with everything else intact and use any number of ways to drive the bolts in so they're flush with the arm surface. I'd recommend removing the strut, laying it over a 4x4 block of wood, trace the holes and drill into the wood. set the bolts into the strut and place them over the holes in the block and use that afore-mentioned BFH and hammer them down. Re-attach the strut and attach it to the LCA. The bolts need to be seated before you attach it to the LCA.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Yeah, for some reason I kept thinking the bolts had to be pressed into the lower control arm, but after reading the responses and seeing that it only has to be pressed into the strut rod that will be much easier to remove, get them pressed in and re-attach. Thanks for the insight, I was dreading trying to remove the LCA after I had just re-assembled everything.
 

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Ha that’s odd because when I did mine and I purchased my fasteners through NPD, the splined portion did go into the lower control arms a bit.
 

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Once you take the strut rod out and seat the splines you shouldn't have any problem. If the spines do need to seat into the control arm, the control arm is softer and thinner metal. I see another style bolt that's sold and don't see why it wouldn' t seat into the control arm when the nut is torqued. New bolts are cheap. Be sure to check alignment when finished.
 

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U also could torque it down with the nuts on the bottom side of the control alarm by using an impact but carefully watch the head of each bolt. Once it’s seated you don’t want it to start spinning because then you defeated the whole purpose of that splined shaft..
That's a great way to destroy the bolts.


Yeah, for some reason I kept thinking the bolts had to be pressed into the lower control arm, but after reading the responses and seeing that it only has to be pressed into the strut rod that will be much easier to remove, get them pressed in and re-attach. Thanks for the insight, I was dreading trying to remove the LCA after I had just re-assembled everything.
The splines will just catch the lower arm, which you torquing the nut down will seat them. Once you press the bolts into the strut rod, you're good to go.
 
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