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Discussion Starter #1
I just finished stripping the fenders on the 65 Fastback I am working on. They have the typical rust damage on the bottom rear of the fender. One has small rust, the other is a bit worse, but both are overall pretty solid. What is the best way to repair them? Do I cut the bottoms off and weld on repro panels, or do I cut out just the rusted area an make a patch panel for it?

This one is by far the worse of the two. the rust damage is in an area about 4” x 6”. The other just has a dozen small pin holes. Note I have stripped the fronts of both and soaked them in evapo-rust so I am confident there is no hidden rust beyond what I can see. The inner frames are in great condition on both. In the pic below, the damage is on the left side. The right side is just some surface pitting.

738273
 

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It doesn‘t appear extensive.. but even the areas that aren’t all the way through need to go - that makes the damage front to rear.

I would probably go with the repro patch panel.
 

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I used the repro patch panel and it fit rather well.
The repro bracket behind that panel was another story. It took a lot of cutting and welding to get it to fit the fender contour.
If you can, make the horizontal cut below that small body line in order to preserve the factory line.
From the photo, it looks like you can stay at least 1" below that line.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I used the repro patch panel and it fit rather well.
The repro bracket behind that panel was another story. It took a lot of cutting and welding to get it to fit the fender contour.
If you can, make the horizontal cut below that small body line in order to preserve the factory line.
From the photo, it looks like you can stay at least 1" below that line.
How did you handle the notched area at the bottom of the fender? The patch panel does not have the notch
 

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I had similar work done on my rear fenders behind the wheels. The body shop that did the work also had a auto recycling (junk) yard. They used metal from cars in the yard to form and make the panels they used. They did a good job. I asked them to use Ford panels but I don't know. They may have cut metal from a Chebby to patch the panels they cut out.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I put the notch in it myself.
Very frustrating the patch panels are so poor. Most are much better and at least try to fit right
 

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I have to repair the bottom of both of my fenders in my 67. I purchased the Canadian patch panels only to find they weren't going to be used in my build. The wheel opening radii were just too big. They are fairly sharp on the original fenders, so they just wouldn't match well without a lot of metal work or bondo. I found a good rust free fender that was wrecked in the front. That'll be one patch panel. I also found a used, rejected Taiwanese fender that'll make a good patch panel too since it was made with the right sharp wheel openings. That's my plan anyways.
 

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Very frustrating the patch panels are so poor. Most are much better and at least try to fit right
True but at least it's something to start with vs just a flat sheet of steel. I just don't understand why the patch panels are so much worse than whole panels. Why don't they just stamp panels and then cut them into pieces and sell them as patch pieces instead of making another die.

I'm half tempted to do an MG or one of the others that Heritage has. They have all the original dies, jigs, punches etc for several cars. A whole body is like 8K pounds built all with original tooling and jigs.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
True but at least it's something to start with vs just a flat sheet of steel. I just don't understand why the patch panels are so much worse than whole panels. Why don't they just stamp panels and then cut them into pieces and sell them as patch pieces instead of making another die.
From what I have seen and read, now that companies have invested in the tools to make the full panels, it is not cost effective for them to sell the patch panels. It would cut into sales of the full panels. That leaves us with old poorly stamped patch panels dating back to the 80s.
 

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I was going to repair the other fender I have but the inner brace is pretty bad and so is the outside. If I were to buy both patch panels I would have 80% of the cost of just buying a replacement fender and still have to do all the patch work. I've opted to just buy a replacement fender for that side and put my efforts into making it fit versus saving the really bad fender I have.
 
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