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Discussion Starter #1
Hey Guys,
For years, I've torqued the lug nuts on my Mustangs's styled wheels to 75 Ft, lbs. Only because, the torque wrench I use, a break-point type, only goes to 75 Ft. Lbs. My DD is 90 lbs. BTW, haven't lost a wheel in 20 years.
What are youse guys doing, in this regard?
 

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I don't think I've ever used a torque wrench on lug nuts. I usually snug them with an impact and then use a breaker bar and deep well socket until they "feel right".
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Well, I've never used a "gun" for installing the lug nuts, but, all the time removing them. In my thinking, it's too easy, to not torque them in a criss-cross pattern to the correct torque. But this, is just my way....to each his own.
 

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Using a digital torque wrench on all my cars, I set it @ 90.
Factory spec on my F150 is 120 lbs.

Aside from getting them tight, for certain wheels, you wanna have them evenly tight (torqued) as to not distort non steel rims.
 

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I use 85 and like Joe, if any of my bolts tighten even the slightest bit on the second round, I go around on all of them again till I get a complete circle with none of them turning. Actually I use a cross pattern initially then just go around the circle. I then and this is important in my simple world, I run the car - hit a couple of my favorite on-ramps use the brakes hard to heat cycle everything good and repeat the torque cycle. I always find nuts that move to the 85 lbs after a good heat cycle.
 

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I torque them 100lbs. 75lbs seems light to me but as you noted you have never lost one.
Now I’ll have to find the maximum clamping torque for a wheel stud just to know.
 

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There is also tightening a screw just till it strips and then back off a 1/4 turn.
Lol! That could lead to a thread of it's own. I'm one of those that almost never uses power to remove or install hardware. Maybe I'm a time wasting minority on that, but I just like having that "feel" or "touch" (whatever you want to call it) you have with hand tools. I have a nice torque wrench I use for many things, and also four or five different length and diameter steel breaker "tubes" I can slip over wrenches or ratchet handles when a little more oomph is needed. The largest of those I keep in the trunk specifically for lug nut duty.
So the only threads I usually muck up are here at VMF. :wink:
 

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I think that an impact gun actually stresses the threads less on a really tight fastener that is stuck on due to stuff (thread locker or corrosion) in the threads than a steady high torque pressure from a wrench when removing. The hammering action of the impact wrench can vibrate and jar the threads loose without the enormous constant stress on the fastener. It is a terrible feeling when you feel the fastener twist itself in two using steady high pressure.
 

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I wouldn't go much over ~80 on a steel wheel with conical nuts. The torque values are generally what the hardware can take and is closer to a a max value, not what is a minimum actually need to hold it on safely. Look at some steel wheels and you'll generally see that the nuts eat away at the holes and can turn them to junk eventually. Same with not doing them unevenly.

Raise you hand if you've ever lifted your car then remember you didn't break the nuts loose?:notamused:
I love my 1/2" cordless impact I got a few years ago. the best part is not having to hear the compressor. Only used to loosen or run them up then the calibrated 4way powered by guns of steel:grin2:.
Like that German actor Alexander Gudanuff.
 

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I'm at 75 Ft. Lbs every morning before heading off to an autocross. Last week at Tire Rack in South Bend they torqued my lug nuts on my 2002 F150 7700 to 135 ft. lbs. and made me sign off on the I would re-torque them between 75 and 100 miles. I'm thinking I'll need a 6' cheater bar to get them loose!
 

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The guys at Firestone seem to think that ~200 ft/lbs is about right.

I needed an 18" breaker bar on my son's '07 Highlander to remove all but one lug nut on our last brake job.

I needed a three foot breaker bar for the other one.

His lug nut tool now has a noticeable bend in it.
 
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