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Discussion Starter #1
The other day I bought a '67 dual resevoir master cylinder for my '66. I heard that it's a bolt on swap that makes the car safer. I see that is has holes for 2 break lines as opposed to the original which only had one. My question is what are the parts I need to do the conversion? I know I need the 2 break lines but also I need a distribution block? Not sure if that's what it's called. My current setup has just one hole for the break line. All help is appreciated. Thanks for the help.
 
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Discussion Starter #3
Scott-

I did this conversion myself, and it has really provided a bit of extra braking power, and beyond a sense of security, knowing that it one set of lines goes out, I still have another (atleast for a little while).

However, I will also say this conversion is by far the seemingly simplest little project that turned into a monster multi week project I have ever had to do on my 'stang let alone imagined.

The extra parts you will need (doing it the way i did it, and if everything goes according to plan) are: two 6 inch brake lines (I forget the diameter, i think 3/16ths, it's the same dimension as your original brake lines), one line coupler, and one T (both the same dimension as your lines), a 5/16ths to 3/16's and 3/8ths to 3/16's convertor (again, those szes may be wrong, but the convertors screw into the '67 MC, and then your brake lines screw into the convertors, so size accordingly) and two 3/16's caps (these will make bolting on the new MC a lot easier because you don't have to worry about brake fluid spilling out).

According to plan you unscrew all the lines from your old MC distribution block (have a bucket around because that brake fluid can go everwhere, and it does strip paint!). Unbolt the old MC, bolt on the new MC with the convertors and the caps screwed in (after having bench bled it!!, and bleed it good!!) then attached the coupler to the line that gos to your back brakes, the T to your two front lines and connect everything together with your 6" brake lines (The front cylinder to the front brakes and the back cylinder to the back brakes). Bleed the brakes, and you are done.

Simple as that, only not (at least for me), the problem I ran into was that I and 3 friends could not for the life of us get the old lines off the old distribution block, after days of trying, 1/2 a can of super penetrating oil and some cut up hands I finally had to cut the lines with a mini pipe cutter, and reflare the lines while they were in car, I couldn't get good flares with the lines in the car so i had to take them all off, and decided that if I was going to take off the lines and put them back on I might as well just replace them, and so I did.

Hope your project goes well!!

Best,
John
 
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Discussion Starter #4
Can't help you with the installation because my dad did mine, but all I'm saying is this: that dual stage master cylinder saved my life Thursday.
 
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Discussion Starter #5
Knightshade...good to hear that. I wasn't so sure I wanted to do the work of a conversion but I've only heard good things about it so I might as well.
John...thanks for the explaination (a great one at that). Hopefully my project will go a little smoother. Can I ask where to get the T and the Line Coupler? Pep Boys or any other auto store or do I have to do some searching? Thanks a lot.
 

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Your conversion is worthless unless you get the combination valve that 67 and later drum brake cars use. Its a small piston that blocks the loss of brake fluid from the good side during a brake failure, otherwise you lose ALL braking whether or not the fronts or just the rears should go out. As a side benefit you could hook up the brake warning light switch thats attached to the valve to a warning light under your dash. Without that combination valve you defeat the purpose of doing a conversion in the first place.
 
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Would you suggest just getting a new '66 single resevior mc and saving up for a power break conversion? Eventually I will be getting disc breaks so its gonna happen someday. I just need a temporary solution as my break fluid is leaking. I have to refill it every once and a while. Thanks.
 

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Whether you later upgrade to disks, or power or both, you should upgrade to a dual system ASAP if you actually use this car. High speed plus NO brakes (its an all or nothing system) equals a lot of excitement at best, and death (yours and possibly others) at worst.

To do this correctly buy a new distribution block (any from a drum brake Ford car - 1967 or after). It will only add between $15 to $40 to the project.

There are three ways to do this conversion. The one mentioned above (which I also did) is to duplicate the 67 setup, a dual MC AND a distribution block. This keeps the circiuts seperate (and some claim will shut off fluid to the leaking side in case of a leak - looking at an exploded diagram of the 67 and later DB it is possible, at least short term). (Ask yourself - why did Ford put a distribution block in if it wasn't needed?)

The second way is to use your existing distribution junction for the front brakes only, just disconnect the back line from the junction and put a plug in that port, and then connect the back brake line directly to the front port of the MC. This avoids having to purchase a new (67 or later) distribution block. Some on this forum claim that the front and rear brakes will function seperately under this setup in the case of a leak. Looking at the MC diagram I would doubt it, but there are VMFers that have lost the rear curciut and still stopped using this system.

The third way is to drop the distribution junction altogether it will function like option two, you are just using a "TEE" instead of the existing junction, no functional difference.

Whatever route you go get some wrenchs designed to remove line nuts. I couldn't get the nuts to break loose from the distribution junction with a pair of visegrips, but once I got the correct wrenchs, they came right off. Didn't need to flare a single line.

John Harvey
 

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If you're going to do the power brake AND dual master conversion Mustang Steve has a superb factory looking conversion that's very inexpensive. I got a new looking power booster and combination valve for about $30 at a junk yard and the plans for $10. Mustang Steve is an engineer by profession and his plans are excellant. I opted to just replace the single master cylinder with a new one at the first sign of a leak. I strongly suggest you do something soon as having to add fluid is a sign the mstr cyl is on its way out (assuming everything else is good). I did not heed that sign about 12 years ago and crashed at slow speed into a traffic intersection signal box. I could have "pumped" the brake pedal but wasn't thinking.

Mustang Steve is a great guy:

http://www.mustangsteve.com/BRAKES.html
 
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