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Last night I was welding a 2v carb opening into the base of my I6 air cleaner housing. I have a Lincoln Electric MIG welder, using shielding gas. I was never able to run a bead when trying to weld this piece in. I used a wire wheel on a hand drill and completely removed all of the paint so it was bare metal to metal at the fitment. The weld would ball up, like a bead, and not flow out. If I was soldering, I would say it was a lack of flux. Welding, it was like the surface was dirty. I tried different settings and speeds, but that did not enable me to run a bead. I ended up tacking it into place at about 100 different spots to get it together. It was also noisy, giving off crackling and sputtering sounds when welding. What do you suppose went wrong?

I ground down the zillion of tack welds and will use body filler to make a smooth transition. Meanwhile, it looks pretty nice on the car - 2v carb under a 1v air cleaner assembly. Very stealthy!
 

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Almost sounds like you were not getting a good ground to the work piece . Check you cable and make sure it is not fraying away from the clamp .
Also , did you clean the area for the clamp ?
Was either piece coated with chrome or something like zinc/galvanizing ?
 

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As mentioned, it sounds like the piece(s) weren't ordinary steel......or the wire you were using was old or cheap.


When you do have everything right, you're still goint to have to make a million tacks to do it without burning thru.....welcome to your very own nightmare.


Incidentally, the electrical polarity is different for gas than fluxcore.
 

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Yeah, I agree with new-stang-fan. Sounds like you were trying to weld pot metal or aluminum. Take a magnut to see if it is steel or not. Wait a sec, don't know if that will work with pot metal. Anyone else got a clue???
 

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See if a magnet will stick to both pieces of metal. If not you are not going to be able to weld it right with standard welding wire. Both pieces have to be steel. Another problem might be that there was no shielding gas. Check to make sure your tank is full and set to the right flow.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
ok, it is the factory air cleaner housing, which is made of stamped steel. Both pieces were of air cleaner housing. The ground could have been the problem. While I think I got all the paint off, I may not have. Also, the back side of one of the pieces of metal I was welding was painted. The bare steel was only on the side I was trying to weld. Yeah, I burned through in spots. That occurred when I re-set the amps to the next higher step. Very interesting. THANKS for the advice. I will check into this stuff and certainly remember for later. p.s., the shielding gas bottle is at least half ful. The bottle pressure was around 100 psi and the pressure out the hose was set at 25 psi.
 

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For sheetmetal, I would turn the heat setting down to the lowest setting. Then I would turn the wire speed up pretty high. On a scrap piece of sheetmetal, try to run a bead. If the wire speed is too fast, the wire will be "pokey", meaning you will be able to feel it hitting the metal. Slow the wire down until it will bead, then study the bead. If it is high and rounded, slow the wire down a little more. When the wire speed is too slow for a given heat range, you will have little balls of molten steel dripping out of the gun. You'll still be able to stick stuff together but you won't be able to run a nice bead. Also, if the wire speed is too slow, it can melt in a glob inside the gun and obstruct more wire from coming out. It will then jam at the feed wheel.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
hmmmm. Yes, I had the heat at the lowest setting, speed was at 2.5, per the instruction booklet. The wire was falling up on the work surface and in some spots, there were little pieces of wire hanging out of the molten ball. I should look around for an old piece of scrap metal to practice on some more. I've welded things like angle iron and traction bars in the past. That is heavier steel.

Thanks for your insights.
 

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Check your gun nozzle. Is it pluged with splatter. [bad gas flow] / Contack tip worn out or wrong size. [to big]Make sure your gun cable is not kinked or twisted when you are welding.Also clean out your gun cable each time you put on a new wire spool.Dirt in your gun cable will bind the wire causing the wire speed to studder.Good Luck!
 

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You didn't mention what size wire you were using... but since you mentioned you've been welding heavier items, I'm guessing your also running 0.030" wire... For sheetmetal I often run 0.025" wire, the bead usually come out much nicer.
 

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p.s., the shielding gas bottle is at least half ful. The bottle pressure was around 100 psi and the pressure out the hose was set at 25 psi.
Ken, I don't know how 25psi relates to Litres/minute but welding in the shed (no breeze to blow gas away) I use 8 to 10 Litres/minute of gas.
Just want you to be aware that you only need just enough gas to keep the air from the weld. Too much gas flow can actually cause air to be drawn into the mix, giving symptoms of not enough gas!!
 

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on thin sheetmetal, the smaller the wire the better. my bodyman uses .025 and .020 for really thin stuff.
 
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