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Discussion Starter #1
I'm hoping to get some opinions from people who have traveled this road. Trying to decide, after sandblasting, if I should have the body work and painting done first, or just blasted and epoxy primed, and mock up suspension and drive train before bodywork/paint. Interested to know what others have done and why.
 

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Mock up everything, every last nut bolt, bumper, trim piece in my opinion. I can't count how many things needed to be massaged a little. Some things are not practical to mock up like some of the window trims that may do more harm than good installing and removing.

I did do a lot of the mock up after I did the body work and got the car into final primer. But certainly not before paint.
 

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I'd say, given you have the space, the time, mock it up first. BTW, is this a concours car or a street cruiser?
When I did my restoration, I just "dove in" and improvised as I proceeded. I was not pressured with a timeline....
Just learning by the "seat of my pants". LOL!
 

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Nice looking convertible. As others have suggested, it looks like you should blast, epoxy, and then do a mock up. You may be able to do some bodywork up to primer surfacer. Is it mostly stock or are you adding some modern upgrades? If the parts originally came off that exact car, then you might be able to move onto paint, but it's never fun trying to work things out around pristine paint. Are you powder coating or painting your parts?
 

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My car was a running, driving vehicle when I delivered it to the body shop for final paint. All of the suspension and drivetrain had been re-assembled prior, but did leave the interior out. I drove it on and off the trailer. My painter really appreciated that he only had to turn the key to move it around his shop and was really good about masking and making sure that there was a minimum of overspray, all panels were cut in off the vehicle and then assembled and gaps set.
 

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Even in the retail commercial body shop world things get nicked, scratched, chipped etc during reassembly or trim out-then they have the inhouse ability to correct it.....you,.... not so much! If you have the ability to mock it all up, take it apart, have those parts cut in off the car, cut in all the jambs, then get the car back, reassemble the cut in parts, the painters and their helpers can back tape the areas and panels of the car well enough for most of us...its not like a tv dave Kindig show built car, alot of b/s they don't tell you about on those shows! Its always the helpers fault too by the way....drama drama drama
 

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If you are replacing everything with the original restored parts, then you won't need to mock anything, you know it already fits. If you are upgrading or replacing parts with reproductions, then mock things up. It also depends on what is being replaced. For example, if replacing doors, fenders, etc then mock everything up for fit and finish before paint. If replacing suspension parts with stock style, you will pretty much know it will fit. If going with highly modified suspension, then mock up.

Also keep in mind that it is easier to 'adjust' hidden parts of the car than those pieces that are freshly painted. Hope this helps.
 

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I took my Mach 1 down to a bare-metal shell. Then I assembled the suspension to make a it a roller. I then bolted on all the body panels to mock it up and spent a LOT of time aligning and working gaps.

Then I blew it all apart and painted. It looked amazing! Unfortunately, I scratched, chipped and dinged it a lot when putting it together. This is because it's the first car I ever painted. I tried very hard to be careful, but you don't know what you don't know. Thus, my take is paint should be the LAST thing you do to your car.

In the mean time, do a lot of research about what paint you want and what color. The world of auto paint is constantly changing. It's getting harder to find correct colors for classic cars. If you want an authentic, original paint color, stand by for heavy rolls. You might get lucky as I did. PPG still had a paint code for Calypso Coral and my local dealer still mixes paint. That's getting harder to find. It was $500 a gallon for the base coat, but boy is it beautiful! Don't cheap out on paint. Cheap paint and paint supplies supplies are NOT a good deal.

The rule of thumb is to stick with the same manufacturer for everything. For example, if you find the color you want from PPG, use PPG primer, sealer, high-build primer and clear coat. I went a different route. Although the base coat is PPG Deltron, everything else is from SPI. This worked out very well.

Don't be afraid to paint your car yourself if it's at all possible. Yeah, it was hard, but boy was it satisfying. And I save so much money I could have screwed up and re-painted three times and still not spent as much as a good shop would charge. And even with the chips and scratches, it STILL looks way better than a lot of "professional" paint jobs I've seen.

Have fun!
 

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Having watched a lot of "the pro's" rebuild these things, they mock up various parts of the car if not the whole car multiple times before doing the final spray. Usually they will at least partially blow the car apart for paint. Sometimes they leave the doors and fenders on and spray everything else separately. If its metallic paint they might try and spray as much of the car together as is practically possible due to the nature of metallic.


I am going to attempt to pull everything off my car and shoot the parts separately since I'm laying euro clear over black base coat so no pearl or sparkle or anything to worry with. I don't have a huge warehouse to hang up all the parts so I will have to shoot the base structure of the car complete and then as I spray other parts and they cure enough they will go on the car. For me the car is the safest place to store this stuff once I spray it and it is dry enough to safely re-install. This is probably the most difficult way possible but the space I have to work with is limited.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Since the car will have many new and updated components, suspension, engine, trans & driveline I can appreciate everyone's input ro mock out up first. Here is what I'm thinking:
1. Have the car completely blasted, inside & out.
2. Have the body work and welding done (mainly the mount for the 3link rear suspension)
3. Have the car epoxy coated (or etching primer haven't decided on that yet)
4. Have the underside, inner fenders front & rear, inner doors coated in Upol Raptor Coat.
5. Have the engine compartment sprayed.
6. Have the interior ****pit sprayed with Lizard skin (sound & heat deadener)
7. Have the interior paint done (this will be parchment)
8. At this point, I'll begin the process of fitting remaining suspension and driveline.
9. At this point, after final body panel alignment, car should be ready for paint.
10. Last, after paint would be interior.

Hopefully this approach will yield a satisfactory result without a whole lot of rework. Thanks for everyone's input. Also interested to hear of people's experience with modifications of this approach.
 

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Since the car will have many new and updated components, suspension, engine, trans & driveline I can appreciate everyone's input ro mock out up first. Here is what I'm thinking:
1. Have the car completely blasted, inside & out.
Be careful on this and make sure the blaster is somebody experienced in blasting cars and has the right blaster nozzle. Blasting wide open panels will warp them

3. Have the car epoxy coated (or etching primer haven't decided on that yet)
Definitely epoxy, etch primer has no place or use on your car and is an outdated technology unless you're a high throughput collision shop. It has almost zero corrosion protection as well. My paint instructor was old school and taught us to use etching primer like it was printed in the Bible, but after I started learning restoration work and not collision work, no restoration guys use etch. Use SPI epoxy, they make a correct Ford Red Oxide. Otherwise you can also use gray, black, or white. The white will not cover solidly like the other colors will.

4. Have the underside, inner fenders front & rear, inner doors coated in Upol Raptor Coat.
Just my opinion, leave the bed liner for trucks, I also believe it has no place on a restoration. And it will make repairs prohibitively more difficult for you (or the next guy) in 25 years. Just me personally, for these areas I spray two coats of Mastercoat Rust Sealer and then two coats of epoxy (red oxide or black). On my 69, somebody undercoated the underside and it's really pissing me off because I need to redo all their half assed body and metal work.

5. Have the engine compartment sprayed.
You could hit this with black epoxy while you're at it as well.


7. Have the interior paint done (this will be parchment)
I'd recommend this step after your exterior is painted in case you get any overspray or dust inside the car, because it can get everywhere. Assuming you're using a spray can for the interior (which work well), if you get this on your exterior paint it's an easy correction and reversible, but not so if you get exterior overspray dust on your interior paint (you're repainting it at this point).

10. Last, after paint would be interior.
This would be a good time to paint the interior as well.

Hopefully this approach will yield a satisfactory result without a whole lot of rework. Thanks for everyone's input. Also interested to hear of people's experience with modifications of this approach.
Well you got mine, and it's worth exactly what you paid for it. :pirate:
 
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