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Discussion Starter #24
Console + Engine Bay

I purchased a reproduction black full-length console body, harness, door springs, wood inserts, and rear light housing. I reused all the hardware, door, ashtray, and top plates from an original donor console. Since the pot metal is original, there is some blistering, but it looks decent. I had to chop a significant amount of the body to allow for the aftermarket under dash evaporator.









Making progress in the engine bay. I installed long tube headers, tandem master cylinder, 65-style equalizer bar, KRC power steering pump and reservoir. We are keeping the stock power steering ram (for now), so we had to get creative interfacing the stock hoses with the new pump kit. New Aluminum radiator with electric fan installed. The in line radiator coolant filter is transparent. I also installed new shocks, single piece export brace, and monte carlo bar. The Custom Auto Air kit AC is equipped with a Sanden compressor, heater control valve, and drier, which is mounted to the condenser up front. Because of the electric fan, I upgraded the AC binary switch for a trinary switch and created my own custom #6 liquid line with an in line splice. We still need to work out the electrical wiring, complete the AN power steering lines, brake distribution block, and pressure control valve for disc brakes. Oh, we will run a Holley 650 for now, but we may swap out for a stock A code Autolite 4100 after a rebuild. Nothing fancy, but it’s coming together.



 

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Nice work on the console! I fought a bit with mine, repairing some cracks and nicks. Should have done the same as you had.
 

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Discussion Starter #28 (Edited)
Why did we go with an electric fan?

Have you ever thought about how much power is lost to a mechanical cooling fan? Check out the Engine Masters Ep. 20 “Cooling Fan Shoot-Out!” In the show, they test a number of different mechanical fans and were loosing 20-30 hp around 5,000 hp! So, this is why we opted to go with an electrical fan. I do think that the air velocity driving 45-60 mph would reduce the power loss and drag by the fan, so I’m sure there are a number of variables that could come into play in real world driving. Interesting stuff.

 

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Discussion Starter #29
Electric Fan Relay Switch and Coil/Distributor Harness

I purchased a Mishimoto electric fan controller with a push in radiator probe. The red wire with the 15 amp fuse is the master hot (to solenoid) black is ground, yellow is keyed ignition source (fan only runs when key is switched to run or accessory), and green is manual switch override wired to the air conditioning trinary switch. Thus, when the AC compressor is engaged, the radiator fan will always be on. I used Deustch 2 pin connectors. The white 2-pin connector runs to the heat sensor probe. This particular controller has a variable setting that I tested and dialed in using a heat gun. I wrapped in electric tape and routed under and around the battery tray.





I created a second harness extending the yellow (ignition source) through the firewall and the green (AC fan override switch) to the trinary switch adjacent to the compressor. I looped in the blue AC compressor wire coming from the Custom Auto Air dash heater controls. I added an additional red and black wire to go between the stock harness coil feed, ballast resistor, and the coil that I relocated to the RH side tower. The Black is the negative between the coil and the distributor. Again I used Deustch 2 pin connectors so the harness is modular and can be easily disassembled.

 

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Discussion Starter #30 (Edited)
LED Headlights and 2 Lamp Relay



I spent some time cleaning up the grill, media blasting the horns and hinge, finding the missing hardware, painting, and assembling the running horse. It’s nothing show quality, but decent. I also installed the Scott Drake LED parking lights. The blinking slowed and is a bit erratic. According to my research, it looks like I need to install a new flasher relay that is compatible with LED lamps because they do not draw enough juice to reliably trigger the stock relay. I may also need to replace the dash headlight switch, so a few bugs to work out.



Speaking of the stock style halogen headlights: they are not very bright. I did some research and for around $125 I was able to convert the headlights to an LED system including the relay harness. I found some classic looking unsealed 7” H4 headlights on eBay and purchased some daylight (6000 kelvin) balanced LED fixtures. I purchased the Redline Lumtronix Headlight harness from CJ Pony Parts. The installation was simple and since I ran the harness along the top of the radiator support along the stock harness, I had to shorten the driver side feed by about a foot. This was the only modification required. I was able to use stock grounding points and screws. Attached is a link to CJ video install. The LED headlights are about 3x brighter than the stock halogens bulbs.



I mounted to the 3 headlamp relays adjacent to the fan relay along the electric fan bracing. I’ll cut and shorten the fan heat probe harness once I have determined that its heat-absorbing placement on the radiator is effective.





https://www.cjponyparts.com/redline-lumtronix-headlight-power-upgrade-harness-for-two-headlights-1965-1973/p/HVU1/

https://vimeo.com/250147879
 

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Looks great so far, I especially like what you did with keeping the full-length factory console. What are you planning on using for A/C vents?
 

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Discussion Starter #32
AC Vents

Looks great so far, I especially like what you did with keeping the full-length factory console. What are you planning on using for A/C vents?
Thanks. I have installed four under dash AC louver housings from Vintage Air. Once the 2” AC ducts are installed, there is literally very little room behind the dash to make changes to wiring. Since taking the photograph, I have replaced the parking brake handle and bolted up the fresh air vent knob. Apparently I need to change out the headlight switch.



 

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Discussion Starter #33
Front Suspension + Shelby Drop

It’s time to say goodbye to the front drum brakes and replace the front suspension. I already swapped the shocks, but after inspecting the upper control arms, I decided I was going to do this right and replace everything with fresh ball joints and bushings.



After cleaning the inside of the towers with a wire wheel, I couldn’t believe how much oily mud was removed. The good news, all that junk probably helped prevent rust.



Next, I painted with POR 15 and top coated with Eastwood Chassis black. In the spirit of keeping everything mostly stock, with a mild restomod flare, we decided to install reconditioned stock upper and lower control arms, but upgrade to polyurethane coil spring insulator pads, 620 coil springs, and drill the 1” Shelby drop.




I media blasted the tower covers and coated with 3M rubberized undercoating. I pulled the reconditioned disc brakes from my 65 Fastback. The spindles say C8 and they are single piston calipers, so it is my understanding that they came from a 68 Mustang. We can always swap to pair of four pistons Kelsey Hays discs that my Father has, but they need to be reconditioned.





Waiting on a 1” front sway bar with polyurethane end links from Mustangs Plus. I can clean, paint, and apply undercoating to the aprons when we remove the fenders for paint.
 

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Discussion Starter #34 (Edited)
Engine First Startup!

I double-checked the coil, solenoid, alternator, ballast resistor, and distributor wiring. My Dad welded up some exhaust collector reducers so that we could temporarily adapt the old dual exhaust with the new headers. Nothing fancy, but we could keep our hearing for the startup. I ran a temporary fuel line to a gas container. We filled the radiator with water, the engine with fresh oil, and primed with an electric drill. We cranked the engine a few times with spark, but no startup. We double-check the spark plugs, made sure we weren’t 180 degrees out and confirmed timing was set to factory 6 degrees advance. The holly carburetor was leaking fuel so we decided to halt things until we had a replacement.



My Dad opted to purchase an Edelbrock AVs2 carburetor with an electric choke. I ran a negative wire to the firewall ground and a positive to the back of the ignition switch. The carburetor is bolted up, the booster, and accessory vacuums plugged. We made a few attempts to start the engine and still no spark after cranking? We checked the “ignition” terminal on the solenoid and it read the full 12 volts. While post ballast resistor positive on the coil read 7 volts. All looks good? During lunch I did some research and read about the distributor ignition condenser nightmares. So we go back and make sure the Mallory condenser is positive is wired to the distributor body, then wired to the negative terminal attached to the coil negative wire. We crank the engine and the engine fires up instantly! We tweak the carburetor idle and set engine timing to about 12 degrees. The Dwell tester read at about 36 degrees, which may be a little on the long side, but its healthy. Oil pressure looked good. Vacuum is steady and healthy. We stopped the engine, checked the tension on the valve springs and bolted up the valve covers to eliminate oil splashing into the headers. We started up the engine again and this time let it warm up. At about 170 degrees the electric fan turned on and kept the engine cool.



We may swap the points for an Ignitor electronic ignition, but it was interesting to tinker and learn with this vintage system. Hard to believe that all of our troubles came from a distributor capacitor: a little ten-dollar part. Oh, it was a bit tricky figuring out how to adapt the KRC power steering pump Male AN 6 fitting to the factory SAE 5/8-18” hose fitting. Thank goodness for Summit racing and their next day delivery. If anyone knows of a better way to do this, please let me know. AN 6 male to NTP 3/8 to SAE 5/8-18”? Should I be worried about an aluminum fitting on a high-pressure power steering hose? So far so good. The comp cam has just enough lump and mild valve chatter from the roller tip rockers for that vintage flare. I think the current exhaust has 2 chamber mufflers, so it’s a bit loud and will most likely have to change, but it sure does sound good.

 

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Discussion Starter #35 (Edited)
Rear Suspension, Trunk, and Undercarriage



Moving onto cleaning up the trunk and removing the rear suspension. Yes, there are bolts under the duck tape fastening the gas tank to the body. The front trunk floor had some severe rust that we will be replacing because of a leaky windshield. Luckily a previous owner had sprayed undercoating everywhere else within the trunk. It’s a mess to wire wheel, but the coating did its job prevention corrosion.



I dropped the original rear end with open 2.80 gears, which will be way too tall with the t5. We will be tossing the tired leafs and these crazy long shackles.



Apparently the car still has the original rear tie down brackets that were never removed by the dealership? After doing some research, this style of brackets came with dual exhaust cars from the San Jose plant. However, this C code car doesn’t have the dual exhaust reinforcement pans, but it does have four holes that match the factory style dual exhaust hanger brackets?

1965 to 1973 Rear Tie Down brackets

http://anghelrestorations.com/uploads/3/1/7/6/3176630/tie_down_v1.0.pdf



It’s an oily and muddy mess. I spent a day cleaning with the wire wheel, applied etching primer, and seam sealer to the rust free areas. You can see all of the holes in the front trunk panel. I have a few exhaust bracket screw holes to weld up.





 

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Discussion Starter #37
Floor Pans

Moving onto removing the interior. The car passed rodent inspection and we move onto the floor pans. We were only planning to replace the right hand floor pan, but after further inspection we decided to replace floor pans, seat risers, and floor supports with new Spectra Premium panels.







Test fitting and trimming for a lap weld (top and bottom). I drilled, cleaned, applied metal prep, and painted the new panels with Eastwood etching weld through primer.



 

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Discussion Starter #40
I really like the way you mounted the fan and relays!
Thanks. We are going for a mostly stock aesthetic (stock interior, original suspension, carburated engine) with a mild restomod flare (5600k LED headlights, t5, electric fan, modern AC). Ease of maintenance and functionality is a priority as this fastback will be a driver.
 
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