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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Status:
Almost ready to go. All rust has been either eliminated, or por-15'd. Body work completed, interior stuff removed including windows, all undercoating removed (man what a job!) and all joint caulking removed.
Questions:
1. The factory caulked, and then painted. I think I should basecoat, paint, and then caulk. Just seems more logical, what say you?
2. I have my paint booth built. I can go either negative or positive ventilation. I'm leaning toward positive ventilation, thinking that it will keep dust down more than negative ventilation.
3. Decided to basecoat with the car apart, then reassemble, then topcoat, and clearcoat.
4. Decided not to repaint the interior except when repairing rust.
5. Can I just use asphalt roofing caulking compound for the joints?

I am planning on executing the plan this weekend, weather (temp) permitting.

Am I on track? Any inputs/suggestions

Thanks - Dave
 

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1) You should use 3M seam sealer before paint. That way it gets painted along with the rest of the car, and looks much better. You should use epoxy primer on the seams before the seam sealer for protection.
2) Keep in mind that a positive pressure booth must have all the seams sealed. Otherwise, you'll have paint fog coming out everywhere in the booth, and getting all over everything. Keep the exhaust fan low to the ground.
3) Read the psheets for your paint. Most bases need to be cleared within 24 hours. That's not a lot of time to allow to dry, and assemble. If the car is solid color, paint car disassembled. If it's metallic, paint it together. And I don't understand when you say base, topcoat, then clear. There are only two steps, base and clear. Unless you're doing a three stage paint job which involves a translucent midstage.
4) your choice.
5) Make sure any substitute for real seam sealer is paintable. Some won't accept paint. Epoxy seam sealer is best. Sold at auto body paint stores.

email me if you have any specific questions at [email protected]
 

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Mark, I'll disagree with you about the seam sealer going on before paint. Ford made a mistake not painting joints prior to seam sealing, as that is where a lot of the rust begins, if the seam sealer gets old.

I'd recommend painting first, then seam sealing, then painting the seam sealing to match what the factory look is.
 

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Oh Midlife, your not disagreeing with me. You're just having another Senior Moment. I recommended he use epoxy primer on the seam, followed by seam sealer, followed by paint.

Have you taken your medication today? /forums/images/icons/smile.gif
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks fellas. Looks like 66emberglow and midlife are saying the same thing. And I agree. I will epoxy prime the joints, and then use a sealer. As far as basecoat, topcoat, clearcoat, etc... Sorry - my bust it is my warped shipyard experience coming through. Basecoat on a hull is primer. The temp will reach a high of 90 deg tomorrow. I will paint in the late morning when the humidity is low, and the temp is about 78 deg. Thanks all, I'll post a picture when done.

Dave
 
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