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Again, going off memory but I believe it was something unique to California registry that allowed this guy that apparently allows someone to own the paperwork on the car. I’d have to watch the show again.
 

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Blaketx-wish I could figure out how to do the quote thing on this sight.
Click on the "reply" in the lower left of the post you want to quote.
 

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Dimples
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I have a SAAC 68-70 Registry. It states that only the first couple of hundred 68 Shelby's had the dual VIN. It became too much to manage and they decided to just go with the Ford VIN with a suffix after that.
Forgive me, but I’m not smart enough to follow how this relates to this story. What does this mean for the maybe/maybe not Blue Lady?
 

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Forgive me, but I’m not smart enough to follow how this relates to this story. What does this mean for the maybe/maybe not Blue Lady?
The talk about identifying it via the Shelby # or the VIN. Depending on when it was made, it may or may not have a Shelby VIN. If anyone has a VIN, partial VIN of the suspected car, SAAC or anyone with a registry can look up who purchased that car.

Sorry, It seemed in my head that I had said more in the previous post.
 

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I have a SAAC 68-70 Registry. It states that only the first couple of hundred 68 Shelby's had the dual VIN. It became too much to manage and they decided to just go with the Ford VIN with a suffix after that.
I guess lucky for me, because the car I just looked at was a Dec ‘67 build car.
 

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I saw that episode of "Auto Biography" when it first came out. Yeah, pretty interesting. I could be off, but as I understand it, years ago some guy tracked down the actual VIN for Morrison's Shelby. I think what he has is DMV paperwork and he's keeping the VIN a secret so HE can find the car. (I gather it would now be difficult to acquire the same paperwork since the California DMV will no longer share information.)

For decades I would hear of people trying to sell, "Jim Morrison's Shelby" which was quickly followed by Mustang enthusiasts shouting, "Scam! That car was crushed!". So, it's pretty bizarre if that car did actually survive. I recall we were pretty skeptical when a guy posted here about his buddy finding, "The other Bullitt Mustang" in Mexico. Many of us had to eat crow over that find.

The Auto Biography show made a very good case about that car being Jim Morrison's Shelby. The guy who bought and restored the car is a retired PGA pro. The restoration is gorgeous and he is simply enjoying the car. That's cool. As for the guy keeping the VIN a secret, I don't think that's at all cool. I get the impression he simply want to get the car and cash in on it.
 

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69 Fastback 351W .030 over, mild cam, C4
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I saw that episode of "Auto Biography" when it first came out. Yeah, pretty interesting. I could be off, but as I understand it, years ago some guy tracked down the actual VIN for Morrison's Shelby. I think what he has is DMV paperwork and he's keeping the VIN a secret so HE can find the car. (I gather it would now be difficult to acquire the same paperwork since the California DMV will no longer share information.)

For decades I would hear of people trying to sell, "Jim Morrison's Shelby" which was quickly followed by Mustang enthusiasts shouting, "Scam! That car was crushed!". So, it's pretty bizarre if that car did actually survive. I recall we were pretty skeptical when a guy posted here about his buddy finding, "The other Bullitt Mustang" in Mexico. Many of us had to eat crow over that find.

The Auto Biography show made a very good case about that car being Jim Morrison's Shelby. The guy who bought and restored the car is a retired PGA pro. The restoration is gorgeous and he is simply enjoying the car. That's cool. As for the guy keeping the VIN a secret, I don't think that's at all cool. I get the impression he simply want to get the car and cash in on it.
I’m sure that guy did just want to cash in on the car. The fact that the car’s damage was consistent with known damage to Morrison’s car and this guy with the dmv information wants it so bad and refuses to say wether it’s the blue lady or not is pretty convincing to me. Let alone the other things they talked about indicating it could be the car.
 

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I kinda think the guy with the car should just come out and say it’s Jim’s car. If paperwork boy wants to challenge it, great. Let’s go to court where you will have to prove it. Then the conjecture is over. We know that won’t happen.

I believe the guy who did all the work restoring the car, should be the prime benefactor of the car‘s value. The guy with the paperwork could have scoured the states looking for the car, and I’m sure he did some work trying to find it. But he didn’t find it, the current owner did.

There must be some common ground somewhere between the paperwork holder, and the car restorer, to come to agreement. They could both come out looking clean if it were proven, then ran across the auction block. I’d think it would fetch millions, like the Bullet Mustang did recently.

Of course, maybe I just like the Doors too much ;)

I’m sure that guy did just want to cash in on the car. The fact that the car’s damage was consistent with known damage to Morrison’s car and this guy with the dmv information wants it so bad and refuses to say wether it’s the blue lady or not is pretty convincing to me. Let alone the other things they talked about indicating it could be the car.
 

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I kinda think the guy with the car should just come out and say it’s Jim’s car. If paperwork boy wants to challenge it, great. Let’s go to court where you will have to prove it. Then the conjecture is over. We know that won’t happen.

I believe the guy who did all the work restoring the car, should be the prime benefactor of the car‘s value. The guy with the paperwork could have scoured the states looking for the car, and I’m sure he did some work trying to find it. But he didn’t find it, the current owner did.

There must be some common ground somewhere between the paperwork holder, and the car restorer, to come to agreement. They could both come out looking clean if it were proven, then ran across the auction block. I’d think it would fetch millions, like the Bullet Mustang did recently.

Of course, maybe I just like the Doors too much ;)
The guy that has the car doesn’t want to claim it’s Morrison’s car cuz he can’t 100% prove it and he didn’t seem interested in selling any time soon if ever. I think the guy with the paperwork is probably just bitter cuz someone else found it and wouldn’t sell it to him
 

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Geez, all the fuss. It's not like its John Voight's LeBaron... :)

Other than Morrison being famous, the car has no other particular significance outside of being a Shelby. Then again people pay stupid money for a lock of someone's hair.
 

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Dimples
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Geez, all the fuss. It's not like its John Voight's LeBaron... :)

Other than Morrison being famous, the car has no other particular significance outside of being a Shelby. Then again people pay stupid money for a lock of someone's hair.
The same could be said about this dress.

Smile Shoe Flash photography Style Thigh


Last time it sold at auction it went for 5.6 million dollars. The difference between literal and metaphorical value can lead to very real price tags.
 
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