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Discussion Starter #1
Hello All,

I just replaced the entire rear drum braking system on one side and before I put the drum back on I had my father push the brake pedal to see if the hydraulic cylinder will move out the shoe but nothing happened. I know I am not supposed to hit the pedal without the drum on but how do I make sure that after I placed the drum the shoe actually engage ?

does it have to do with not bleeding the line or is it something with my Installation ! I followed the directions step by step and I am confident that I have done it right
 

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Dimples
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I would look to bleeding as the main culprit. Ford drum brakes are pretty squared away. Finish up the other side and bleed it properly and you should be good to go. Make sure you fiddle with the adjuster at the bottom to make sure the shoes are best positioned to do good work and you’ll be fine.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I would look to bleeding as the main culprit. Ford drum brakes are pretty squared away. Finish up the other side and bleed it properly and you should be good to go. Make sure you fiddle with the adjuster at the bottom to make sure the shoes are best positioned to do good work and you’ll be fine.
Thank you. So you don’t think it is a faulty wheel cylinder ? i will finish up the other side and bleed the system. Hopefully it will self correct the issue.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
A bad wheel cylinder is entirely possible, but given the circumstances, not the most likely culprit.
Ok! Is there a way to check if the brake are working after I bleed the system ? Would going in reverse and hitting the brake will give me an indication of whether or not the drum shoes are engaging? I am concerned that even after I bleed the system, the brakes don’t work. I have front disc brakes.
 

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Dimples
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Ok! Is there a way to check if the brake are working after I bleed the system ? Would going in reverse and hitting the brake will give me an indication of whether or not the drum shoes are engaging? I am concerned that even after I bleed the system, the brakes don’t work. I have front disc brakes.
That’ll work. In fact, the automatic adjusters are designed to auto adjust in reverse, so it certainly won’t hurt.
 

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Did your rear drum brakes work before you did a brake rebuild?
If you go to other rear wheel, if you try to turn wheel while someone steps on brakes, doe that wheel stop? This will tell you if you have a side specific issue or a rear braking system issue.
Often times (on old & newer cars) I've had issue getting no pressure to a wheel cylinder. Problem a bad/collapsed rubber brake hose.
 

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Not sure where you are in this build at the moment, so I'll throw this out...
In the bleeding process, did you follow the generally accepted practice of beginning the bleeding process with the wheel farthest from the master cylinder? That is, the "right rear", followed by the "left rear", then "right front" and lastly, "left front"?
You say you might be unsure the brakes are working? You could raise a rear wheel (since this is your concern) , have a helper apply the brakes, while you attempt to turn the wheel, either by hand or using a long bar extension with a lug nut socket, on one of the lugs and turning CW?
If you have good wheel resistance and in the bleeding process, you followed the two person bleed practice with no bubbles prior to tightening the bleed screw, then, you should be good. You should have a "firm" pedal.
Power brake systems can offer a different challenge in the "feel" but the "process" is the same.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Not sure where you are in this build at the moment, so I'll throw this out...
In the bleeding process, did you follow the generally accepted practice of beginning the bleeding process with the wheel farthest from the master cylinder? That is, the "right rear", followed by the "left rear", then "right front" and lastly, "left front"?
You say you might be unsure the brakes are working? You could raise a rear wheel (since this is your concern) , have a helper apply the brakes, while you attempt to turn the wheel, either by hand or using a long bar extension with a lug nut socket, on one of the lugs and turning CW?
If you have good wheel resistance and in the bleeding process, you followed the two person bleed practice with no bubbles prior to tightening the bleed screw, then, you should be good. You should have a "firm" pedal.
Power brake systems can offer a different challenge in the "feel" but the "process" is the same.
Just finished installing the other side. I blended all the lines as you have outlined. My brake pedal is not firm enough and I don’t have a good brake. The right rear is stopping when brake is applied and I can hear the shoe engaging but not the left side. There is enough oil traveling Through the line into the wheel cylinder but the shoe is not engaging at all and the brake pedal is so lose. What could be the issue here ? Should I try to bleed again all lines and change the cylinder on that side ?
 

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Just finished installing the other side. I blended all the lines as you have outlined. My brake pedal is not firm enough and I don’t have a good brake. The right rear is stopping when brake is applied and I can hear the shoe engaging but not the left side. There is enough oil traveling Through the line into the wheel cylinder but the shoe is not engaging at all and the brake pedal is so lose. What could be the issue here ? Should I try to bleed again all lines and change the cylinder on that side ?
Maybe, got a picture of the brake with the drum off?

Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Maybe, got a picture of the brake with the drum off?

Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk
Here both pix of the side that does not engage. Do you see any installation error?
 

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The installation looks good but you are missing the retainer that goes on the top anchor stud before the springs and adjusting cable go on. The retainer has 2 ears, 180* apart that prevent the shoes from coming off of the anchor stud. It looks similar to this one.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
The installation looks good but you are missing the retainer that goes on the top anchor stud before the springs and adjusting cable go on. The retainer has 2 ears, 180* apart that prevent the shoes from coming off of the anchor stud. It looks similar to this one.
Yes it didn’t have it before and was not included in the hardware kit that I ordered. Will this prevent the shoe from engaging ? Or it has no impact on functionality?
In addition, if there is no issue with installation and the cable feeding oil is working, would you say that the cylinder is faulty ? Also I was asked if my car is built post or pre April, I have no idea how to find out and not sure if I have ordered the incorrect one.
 

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When you loosen the bleeder screw and pump the pedal do you get fluid out of the bleeder? If you have fluid going into the cylinder it is nearly impossible for the pistons in the cylinder to not move. They would have to be rusted up solid to not move.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
When you loosen the bleeder screw and pump the pedal do you get fluid out of the bleeder? If you have fluid going into the cylinder it is nearly impossible for the pistons in the cylinder to not move. They would have to be rusted up solid to not move.
Yes I have nice flow of oil. It is really driving me nuts I have been working on it all day and I can’t get the shoe to engage. I jacked up the car and had my father hit the brake pedal but I was still able to rotate the drum with no friction
 

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How old is the flexible rubber brake line going from the body of the car to the rear axle? There could be an issue with bits of internal rubber decomposed and blocking fluid at high pressure but not the lower pressure as you bleed with the bleeder screws open.
 

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Discussion Starter #19 (Edited)
How old is the flexible rubber brake line going from the body of the car to the rear axle? There could be an issue with bits of internal rubber decomposed and blocking fluid at high pressure but not the lower pressure as you bleed with the bleeder screws open.
There is two rubber hoses going in. One that is vertical and the other horizontal.
I took out the vertical one coming in and when I pressed the pedal not even a drop of oil. I am thinking it’s the vent tube which makes sense.
Now the other one I am assuming it is the brake line you referring to and it is originaL. Should I disconnect the end of it and test for fluid? Also is that connected to the master cylinder up front.
 

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Lets clear up terminology 1st. You said "right side" works, posted a pic of rear wheel of one that doesn't, Your picture is the right side.
R/L determined by operating position, meaning you in driver seat, that's the left side looking forward. So passenger side is RH side, so your RH rear wheel doesn't work. IF I got it and not crazy.
So if driver rear (l/h side works when pedal pressed, then fluid is getting to rear, and rubber hose from chassis line to axle is ok. Correct?
But if r/h side (passenger) wheel piston not moving then need to determine if steel line from axle distribution block blocked, or is wheel cylinder frozen.
Disconnect steel line at wheel cylinder, press brake pedal. Does any fluid come out? If yes, then wheel cylinder is frozen. If not I'd disconnect same steel line at axle distribution block, press pedal, any fluid out of block?
That should get you your answer what's bad.
 

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