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I found a Mustang II on the side of the road. It`s been there soooo long the felt tip marker on the for sale sign faded so I couldn`t make out the phone number...

So I`m thinking it could be had cheap, or maybe even just to get it out of there ;)
I had always thought they had a steering rack that could be used on an early car, but when I was checking it out, I found it`s a front steer rack ::
Why are MII front ends desireable?
Certainly the rest of the car did absolutely nothing for me :p not because it`s an MII, but because in it`s current condition this car would be crap if it was a Lexus...
 

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Mustangs have always had front steer.


The MII is famous for its rack and pinion steering.
 

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I'll repeat: In reference to the Mustang II suspension.
The 65-70 and even the 71-73 front suspension was taken from the Falcon. On the drawing board in 1957 or 1958.
The Mustang II design was started sometime in 1970 or 1971. It's a little more modern, plus it also fits.
And then there is the Fox body front suspesion. That came out on the Fairmont in 1978, likely on the drawing board in 1974 or 75.
Don't you just love that? And somebody advertises the M II suspension kit by stating "bring your classic Mustang into the 21st century. Huh??
 

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It's not that the M2 suspension is any more "modern" than the early cars. In fact, it's a setup that is quite similar to Chebbys and big-Fords. It is an unequal length double a-arm design with the coil spring loading the LOWER control arm and sitting in a pocket between the arms. In this way, you can eliminate the early cars shock towers and fab the M2 suspension, putting all the major pieces outside the aprons. Now you have a cavernous engine compartment to fill with all kinds of goodies!
 

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As already mentioned, the advantage is gaining a larger engine bay in regards to the Vintage Mustang. Hot rodders like it because it is a compact rather simple system. Most of the conversion kits come with a pre-fabricated crossmember to weld in - making the conversion rather quick - if one can weld!

In terms of handling, it isn't in the same class as a modern Corvette but it's okay for a street driver.

Regards,

Dean T

(grammar)
 

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67 coupe, 69 Sportsroof, 86 hatchback
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Few people bother with them anymore. A major reason for changing over to the MII suspension was to eliminate the shock towers so you could fit a much larger engine. A plus was a simple and reliable reliable rack and pinion and some rather marginal disk brakes. MII components were never designed to support a 460.
Nowadays there are any number of components (or a complete kit) widely available for a "Mustang II" setup. The vast majority of this stuff is of higher quality than the originals. Plus it's not rusty ::. You can buy a complete setup that can ably deal with the power and weight of a big block or whatever. The street rod crowd has been using this stuff so long that the shortcomings of the OEM parts are well known.
 
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