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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
A post on the Mustang Mach E Forum by the owner of a Mustang Mach E GT who took his car to the drag strip:

I'm X233, base GT with 72% charge.

I didn't do any prep, no air pressure changes, no cooling, nothing. I drove 45 miles to the track, went through tech and straight onto the dragstrip. 1st run was against a Hellcat Challenger. I left him at the light looking silly but he caught me and went flying by. 15 mph is a pretty big margin. The GT really slows down after 80 mph or so. I ran it in Unbridled mode.

My second run was against a modified Grand National. Same deal, left it sitting but got walked down. Unbridled extend mode, slowest run. The car felt noticeably slower. I'm not sure why and I'm a little confused.

Last run was against a modified newer GTI. Unbridled mode, no extend. Brakes on, throttle to pre-load it and saw a message about reduced performance and to check the owner's manual. I cut my best 60' but didn't break 100 mph.

What I learned is that these things are gonna hurt some serious feelings on the street in a stop light race. The fact that they're completely quiet makes it worse for the victim. From a launch to 60 there aren't many ICE cars that'll keep up with it. After 80ish, however, prepare to be overtaken.

And disclaimer...please don't street race in any sort of traffic.

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The Mach E GT and the Mach E GT Performance Edition are now being delivered and their instant torque and speed 0-60 MPH beats the Premium and Select models. I've never seen or riden in one yet. The Performance Edition is the fastest.
 

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After owning & driveing a Toyota Prius for 5 years until giveing it to my granddaughter, I can only imagine how a performance elec car runs.

Even driveing the econo electric car ,the torque is instanious & more than you might think . Even with it being a hybrid with a gas eng , at highway speed the torque is still there as soon as you step on it & the electric comes on line, even if cruising with the electric drive.

Like it or not they are coming . For the masses ,not for awhile I don't think especially for people such as myself who are pretty far out from the big citys. Will I see it most likely the beginning stages but I doubt I'll live to see it as a country wide transportation mode.
.. If I do I figure I'll be to old to drive let a lone care. As bad as Cali burn up now with fires mostly from a overtaxed elec grid, where is everybody suspossed to get that power from since most of us have a grid system that came over on the boat with Noah? The only good thing for them i can see is maybe there won't be anything left to burn up. But they will have clean air after all the combustibles are consumed & the smoke clears. And they are pushing so hard to help the uninlightened masses have a better life.

Sorry jumped track for a minute.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
[QUOTE="Wayne clark, post: 10541610, member: 223173"
Even driveing the econo electric car ,the torque is instanious & more than you might think . Even with it being a hybrid with a gas eng , at highway speed the torque is still there as soon as you step on it & the electric comes on line, even if cruising with the electric driv
[/QUOTE]
You're right; instantaneous torque which really propels them off the line. How does this compare to lets say a stock 289 V-8 1968 Mustang (the car my wife had when we got married)? 0 - 60 (number of seconds) and then higher speeds to the end of the strip.

It was a big surprise for me because I had this slow golf cart like car. in my mind. Looks they can't keep it up at higher speeds though. I've had a few instances where the car in the other lane bolts out when the light changes and I step on mine and pass them up. The only thing is if there's a cop around and I'm speeding at the end; I try to slow down as soon as I leave them in the dust. And my car is a Premium not the new GT or GT Performance Edition. From what I've read the car accelerates so fast that the driver is affected by the torque and instant speed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Can’t say I’m mad at it running mid-12’s.

I want one, but stand by the assertion that if/when I get one, I’ll be removing/covering all Mustang logos. It appears to be a great car, but it ain’t a Mustang.
I hear you and understand what you’re saying. It is a crossover SUV so it obviously doesn’t look like a traditional Mustang. I won’t argue that. However, Ford owns the Mustang name and for marketing reasons named it a Mustang so it IS a Mustang! It will never look like the 2 door coupe that we all recognize it as a Mustang. Now we’ll have to add a 4 door SUV hatchback. There are Mustang ponies all over the car and you can’t find Ford badge until you look at the front windshield on top by the rear view mirror glass. Anyway, I’m on a Vintage Mustang forum so I expect the majority feel like you do and that’s OK.
 

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I hear you and understand what you’re saying. It is a crossover SUV so it obviously doesn’t look like a traditional Mustang. I won’t argue that. However, Ford owns the Mustang name and for marketing reasons named it a Mustang so it IS a Mustang! It will never look like the 2 door coupe that we all recognize it as a Mustang. Now we’ll have to add a 4 door SUV hatchback. There are Mustang ponies all over the car and you can’t find Ford badge until you look at the front windshield on top by the rear view mirror glass. Anyway, I’m on a Vintage Mustang forum so I expect the majority feel like you do and that’s OK.
As a great man once said, “I reject your reality and substitute my own.”
 

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I agree with Blake. It seems like a fine automobile and I would consider it for my DD, once the infrastructure is there to support it and charging times are reduced. But the Mustang name means something and is one of the most recognizable brands in the world. I mean no offense when I say this, but an SUV ain’t no Mustang. Should have called it a Mach-E and left it at that. Just my .02 for what it’s worth.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
I agree with Blake. It seems like a fine automobile and I would consider it for my DD, once the infrastructure is there to support it and charging times are reduced. But the Mustang name means something and is one of the most recognizable brands in the world. I mean no offense when I say this, but an SUV ain’t no Mustang. Should have called it a Mach-E and left it at that. Just my .02 for what it’s worth.
That’s OK, no offense taken! I know lot of people feel exactly like you. But Ford’s marketing strategy didn’t match your position and in owning the name went ahead and used it. I’ve heard many say they should have called it a Mach E and I think they could have done that but they didn’t. They wanted the name recognition Mustang has and it worked. The car is in high demand and you have to wait months to get one (I waited 6 months).

I agree with you 100% on your first points. I purchased it for my daily driver as I feel electric cars aren’t ready for “prime time” yet. The infrastructure isn’t there (DCFC) and the battery technology needs to evolve where it doesn’t take 20 minutes to charge and the miles you get need to be more. This will happen but I don’t know how many years that will take. I’m 72 and I also bought the car because an electric car was on my “bucket list.” I’ve had many ICE vehicles (a 1968 Mustang) and 3 hybrids. I wanted to have an electric car and I’m a Ford man so when I found out they were coming out with an electric car I jumped on it. The name Mustang had nothing to do with my decision (OK, OK maybe subconsciously it helped make the decision) but being a Ford did. I’m also an early adopter (with electronics, computers, cell phones, etc.) so I feel comfortable buying the first generation of this car (I had a 2002 Thunderbird which was the first year for that car too).

I put up this post to show how fast they are off the line. I never thought an electric car would perform like that but it does.The GT and GT Performance Edition are like the same thing with the traditional Mustang; its the fast cars Ford makes for the car and they call it GT ( don’t know what that means; Grand Touring? The fact that they beat out ICE cars in the 0-60 acceleration time off the line was a real revelation to me.

Just my $0.04
 

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That’s OK, no offense taken! I know lot of people feel exactly like you. But Ford’s marketing strategy didn’t match your position and in owning the name went ahead and used it. I’ve heard many say they should have called it a Mach E and I think they could have done that but they didn’t. They wanted the name recognition Mustang has and it worked. The car is in high demand and you have to wait months to get one (I waited 6 months).

I agree with you 100% on your first points. I purchased it for my daily driver as I feel electric cars aren’t ready for “prime time” yet. The infrastructure isn’t there (DCFC) and the battery technology needs to evolve where it doesn’t take 20 minutes to charge and the miles you get need to be more. This will happen but I don’t know how many years that will take. I’m 72 and I also bought the car because an electric car was on my “bucket list.” I’ve had many ICE vehicles (a 1968 Mustang) and 3 hybrids. I wanted to have an electric car and I’m a Ford man so when I found out they were coming out with an electric car I jumped on it. The name Mustang had nothing to do with my decision (OK, OK maybe subconsciously it helped make the decision) but being a Ford did. I’m also an early adopter (with electronics, computers, cell phones, etc.) so I feel comfortable buying the first generation of this car (I had a 2002 Thunderbird which was the first year for that car too).

I put up this post to show how fast they are off the line. I never thought an electric car would perform like that but it does.The GT and GT Performance Edition are like the same thing with the traditional Mustang; its the fast cars Ford makes for the car and they call it GT ( don’t know what that means; Grand Touring? The fact that they beat out ICE cars in the 0-60 acceleration time off the line was a real revelation to me.

Just my $0.04
The instant torque of an electric motor sure beats the heck out of an ICE, sounds like a riot to run down the track. Enjoy!
 
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Turn that frown upside down!

Kudos to Ford for Making the Mustang Mach E a new platform and not simply discontinuing the S550 and killing the dino powered rear wheel drive Mustang altogether.
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
The instant torque of an electric motor sure beats the heck out of an ICE, sounds like a riot to run down the track. Enjoy!
Thank you, I do enjoy it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Turn that frown upside down!

Kudos to Ford for Making the Mustang Mach E a new platform and not simply discontinuing the S550 and killing the dino powered rear wheel drive Mustang altogether.
Everything I’ve read is that the traditional ICE Mustang is safe for the next several years.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
It seems like a fine automobile and I would consider it for my DD, once the infrastructure is there to support it and charging times are reduced.
I forgot to add that as a DD (daily drive) you charge it at home overnight so that infrastructure and time to charge to a set SOC isn't and shouldn't t be a factor in buying one now. It's the long trips that are the problem and as a daily driver you won't be taking very many. I purchased mine with the thought that 95% of my driving is local or 150 miles to see my oldest daughter (car does this easily with 30% charge left on the battery.). We wouldn't take it to see my other daughter in Palm City Florida (we go in my Acura MDX).
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
saw a couple more of them in the last week or two. I do like the car.
I wish you could sit in it and take a test drive. You'd see how quiet it is unless you run it in "unbridled" mode (maybe this is a negative thing as after listening to several Mustangs arriving at a Mustang Car Show I went to a month ago some were really LOUD). Then they add synthesized sounds to mimic a traditional Mustang and tighten up the steering, etc. and give it a more sporty feeling/ride. When you floor it in unbridled mode those sounds are very prominent. You'd also see what I mean about being thrown back in your seat during the acceleration. Go to your local Ford dealer and test drive one if they'll let you.
 

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I'
I wish you could sit in it and take a test drive. You'd see how quiet it is unless you run it in "unbridled" mode (maybe this is a negative thing as after listening to several Mustangs arriving at a Mustang Car Show I went to a month ago some were really LOUD). Then they add synthesized sounds to mimic a traditional Mustang and tighten up the steering, etc. and give it a more sporty feeling/ride. When you floor it in unbridled mode those sounds are very prominent. You'd also see what I mean about being thrown back in your seat during the acceleration. Go to your local Ford dealer and test drive one if they'll let you.
I'm in no danger of buying a new car anytime soon, if ever again.
 

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These days I don't really care as much about straight line acceleration, if it breaks low 14s in 1/4 that's enough straight line acceleration for me. The reason I own a classic mustang as my toy of choice is that its the perfect combination of light, vintage styling, and balanced acceleration and handling(well I should say the way I am building mine is I am aiming for perfectly balanced acceleration and handling since its a bit lacking in both from the factory). The problem I have with the Mach-E is the fact that Ford tacked the Mustang name onto it...its not a Mustang and never will be. Just like the Porsche Taycan Turbo is not a turbo and never will be. If Chevrolet tacked the Corvette name onto an electric Suburban you can bet the 'vette guys would feel the exact same way. In the end words and names matter, choosing to ignore that fact has repercussions. In this case, that repercussion is that I will never consider it a Mustang(neither will many other Mustang owners) regardless of what Ford stamps on it. Further, it has solidified my intention to not have any Mustang badges on my car at all...or any Ford badges either. Two can play at that game, if the Mach-E is a Mustang, then my car no longer is.

That being said, as for the car itself, I have nothing against the Mach-E. I think Ford did a great job for their first attempt at a production EV and the performance numbers are solid if straight line acceleration is your thing. I hope Ford sells a million of them...my opinion of the car has nothing to do with the engineering behind it and everything to do with the marketing.

In point of fact, I am keeping an open mind to sourcing the electric motor from one of these to build an EV of my own once there is a large enough supply of parts EVs to source other pieces like battery packs from.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
These days I don't really care as much about straight line acceleration, if it breaks low 14s in 1/4 that's enough straight line acceleration for me. The reason I own a classic mustang as my toy of choice is that its the perfect combination of light, vintage styling, and balanced acceleration and handling(well I should say the way I am building mine is I am aiming for perfectly balanced acceleration and handling since its a bit lacking in both from the factory). The problem I have with the Mach-E is the fact that Ford tacked the Mustang name onto it...its not a Mustang and never will be. Just like the Porsche Taycan Turbo is not a turbo and never will be. If Chevrolet tacked the Corvette name onto an electric Suburban you can bet the 'vette guys would feel the exact same way. In the end words and names matter, choosing to ignore that fact has repercussions. In this case, that repercussion is that I will never consider it a Mustang(neither will many other Mustang owners) regardless of what Ford stamps on it. Further, it has solidified my intention to not have any Mustang badges on my car at all...or any Ford badges either. Two can play at that game, if the Mach-E is a Mustang, then my car no longer is.

That being said, as for the car itself, I have nothing against the Mach-E. I think Ford did a great job for their first attempt at a production EV and the performance numbers are solid if straight line acceleration is your thing. I hope Ford sells a million of them...my opinion of the car has nothing to do with the engineering behind it and everything to do with the marketing.

In point of fact, I am keeping an open mind to sourcing the electric motor from one of these to build an EV of my own once there is a large enough supply of parts EVs to source other pieces like battery packs from.
I hear you and appreciate what you are saying. I would expect that many on this board feel the same way. Ford made their own choice when naming their new EV car and chose Mustang even though there was (and is) a lot of animosity in doing that. In 2002 Ford came out with a 2 seat convertible/hardtop car and called it a Thunderbird. Those that had classic Thunderbirds were in an uproar about it. They didn’t include them in their clubs or car shows. I know this because I had a 2002 Torch Red Thunderbird. We went through the same thing that Mustang Mach E owners are now; nobody wanted to accept us. In time this changed and I'm hoping it will again now. To me it is NOT a classic Mustang by any stretch. It IS Ford's entry into the EV world and it IS a crossover SUV that is named Mustang. Ford will have to deal with those that are enraged by their choice. For now I'm just enjoying my car just like I did when my wife and I had a Sunlit Gold/Black Vinyl Wrap 1968 Mustang 289 V-8.
 
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