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Saw a guy selling a 1968 convertible on craigslist in which he states some mustangs were made in mexico and that they used 67 parts to put them together until they ran out of the 67 parts and then started using 68 parts. Is this true?

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I know they had 2 plants in Mexico. Don't know if they used parts in the next year but it would not surprise me.
 

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It's true some Mustang were made in Mexico for non-U.S. sales. I don't know about the claim of using 68 parts when 67 parts ran out. And if it was true, so what?
 

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I do know that the Mexican laws at the time did not allow them to assemble the fastback/sport roof configuration. I'd want to jump the border too.
 

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From what I have read they only made coupes in Mexico but anything is possible.
Mexico built cars had a unique VIN so that would be the first thing to check.
 

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From Dave Hammars' site-

HISTORY

Between March 5th, 1964 and late June 1973, Ford built approximately 2,978,272 Mustangs at their three U.S. plants -- these numbers are well documented. However, even many of the most fervent U.S. Mustang fanatics are largely unaware that Mustangs were also built at five Ford locations outside of the U.S.:
  • Mexico City's "La Villa" plant
  • Valencia, Venezuela (starting in October 1966)
  • Lima, Peru (starting in November 1966)
  • Amsterdam, The Netherlands (starting in September 1965)
  • and in a pilot program, 200+ U.S.-built 1965/66 Mustangs were converted to righthand drive at Ford's plant in Homebush (a suburb west of Sydney), Australia (July 1965 - September 1966)
Since few of these cars ever made it to the United States, there has been virtually no acknowledgement of these cars by "official" Mustang publications, save for the rare "Shelby de Mexico" feature. Even Jim's Haskell and Smart were only able to obtain four Mexican Mustang serial numbers -- and virtually no other information concerning these cars.

The "South of the Border Mustang Registry" and this website are dedicated to collecting and presenting all possible information concerning these "forgotten" examples of our beloved Classic Mustangs.

<center>DOOR TAG DECODING

</center> Not only are the "South of the Border" door tags formatted differently from those on U.S. Mustangs, the style and data also differed between each country. <center>
</center> <table border="0" cellpadding="10"><tbody><tr><td colspan="2"> <center>Mexico (Early)

</center> The earliest Mexican cars (built approximately January - June 1965) were almost wholly assembled in the U.S., most likely at Dearborn. As such, they received modified U.S.-style VIN's and only the bare essentials on their data plates: </td></tr> <tr> <td><center>

Rene Conde's 1965 Coupe, built around 10 February 1965,
is the earliest Mexican Mustang in the registry database.
</center> </td> <td> TIPO (Body Type) = "65A" (Just your average Coupe.)
NUMERO DE SERIE = VIN
"5" = 1965
"MEX" = Mexican Export Model
"07" = Coupe (The only body style allowed in Mexico until 1973)
"C" - 289-2V (Though the cars were almost certainly delivered to the customer with a Mexican-built 289-4V.)
The final six digits, as with U.S. domestic units, are the Consecutive Unit Number -- a one-up serial (starting at 100001) in this case apparently covering all U.S.-built knock-downs shipped to Mexico for final assembly, regardless of model.
</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"> <center>
</center> </td> </tr> <tr><td colspan="2"> <center>Mexico (After June 1965)

</center> </td></tr> <tr><td><center>

Gabor Kiss' 1968 Mexican-Built Deluxe Interior Coupe
now resides in Miskolc, Hungary.
</center></td> <td> VOLANTE (Wheel) = "IZQ" (short for "Izqueirdo -- "Left", meaning LH drive) used in 1965, later years simply used "L"
MOTOR = The only engine offered until 1969(?) was "289-4V" (spelled out for 1965, two letter code "AC" used for later years), "AO" = Boss 302(?) for 1969
TRANS = "1" = 3-Spd Manual, "4" = C-4 Auto (Probably same as U.S. codes)
EJE (Axle) = "1" = 3.00:1 Open (Probably same as U.S. codes)
VESTIDURA (Interior) = "22" = Blue (1965), Later Years "VG" (Black (or Red?) Standard Vinyl), "VB" (Blue Deluxe Vinyl), "VWZ" (Black Knitted Vinyl), "VC" & "VM" (Unk) have been seen

Note that the model year, not well-defined by the VIN, is indicated in the lower right-hand corner of the door tag as "MOD-YY" </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"> <center>
</center> </td> </tr> <tr><td colspan="2"><center>Venezuela

</center></td></tr> <tr><td><center>

Ricardo Gamero of Caracas owns this beautiful 1968 Venezuelan Mustang </center></td><td> COLOR
MOTOR
TRANS
EJE
TAP. ("TAPICERIA" -- Interior)
REF. (Apparently always left blank)
SERV. ("SERVICIO" -- Service) (Apparently always left blank)

U.S. codes were used for all fields on Venezuelan door tags except the "Tapiciera" (Interior Trim), which included a "T" suffix not found on American models (and whose meaning is not yet known.)
</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"> <center>
</center> </td> </tr> <tr><td colspan="2"><center>Netherlands

</center></td></tr> <tr><td><center>

Erik Brom of Amsterdam owns this 1966 Mustang, assembled at the nearby Ford plant in November 1965.</center></td> <td>Use of the U.S. door tag and the "Made in U.S.A." statement suggests that like the early "5MEX" Mexican cars, these may have been shipped to the Netherlands as either "knock downs" or unserialized bodies, and completed there for compliance with the regulations of the destination country.

Body, Axle and Transmission codes appear to match those used in the U.S.

Color and Trim codes, however, seem to have used European codes. The "F03" color code seen here may indicate the 3rd ("03") color option of the 1966 ("F") model year. All 1967 color codes seen so far have been preceded by "64" or "66".

Spaces for the date and DSO were left blank.
</td></tr></tbody></table>
 

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More from Hammar-

FINDINGS

<center>
</center> <center>Production Figures

</center> <center>Courtesy of Kevin Marti of Marti Auto Works, Mustang production totals for calendar year 1966:</center>
<center> <table bgcolor="#77AAFF" border="1"> <tbody><tr><td colspan="14"><center>1966</center></td></tr> <tr><td>
</td><td>Jan</td><td>Feb</td><td>Mar</td><td>Apr</td><td>May</td><td>Jun</td><td>Jul</td><td>Aug</td><td>Sep</td><td>Oct</td><td>Nov</td><td>Dec</td><td>Total</td></tr> <tr><td>Mexico</td><td align="right">353</td><td align="right">261</td><td align="right">109</td><td align="right">72</td><td align="right">109</td><td align="right">201</td><td align="right">369</td><td align="right">526</td><td align="right">363</td><td align="right">119</td><td align="right">54</td><td align="right">217</td><td align="right">2753</td></tr> <tr><td>Venezuela</td><td align="right">
</td><td align="right">
</td><td align="right">
</td><td align="right">
</td><td align="right">
</td><td align="right">
</td><td align="right">
</td><td align="right">
</td><td align="right">
</td><td align="right">27</td><td align="right">67</td><td align="right">137</td><td align="right">231</td></tr> <tr><td>Peru</td><td align="right">
</td><td align="right">
</td><td align="right">
</td><td align="right">
</td><td align="right">
</td><td align="right">
</td><td align="right">
</td><td align="right">
</td><td align="right">
</td><td align="right">
</td><td align="right">6</td><td align="right">28</td><td align="right">34</td></tr> <tr><td>Netherlands</td><td align="right">40</td><td align="right">36</td><td align="right">53</td><td align="right">48</td><td align="right">41</td><td align="right">6</td><td align="right">3</td><td align="right">8</td><td align="right">4</td><td align="right">6</td><td align="right">112</td><td align="right">40</td><td align="right">397</td></tr> <tr><td>Australia</td><td align="right">4</td><td align="right">22</td><td align="right">34</td><td align="right">26</td><td align="right">20</td><td align="right">18</td><td align="right">17</td><td align="right">19</td><td align="right">1</td><td align="right">
</td><td align="right">
</td><td align="right">
</td><td align="right">161</td></tr> <tr><td colspan="13">Total Foreign Mustang Production for CY 1966:</td><td align="right">3576</td></tr> </tbody></table></center>
<center>Mexico

</center>
  • International production in Mexico was limited to Coupes until 1973, when the first sportsroof Mach 1's were built. (Prior to this, Mexican law allowed no other body style.)
  • The earliest Mexican units, built from late 1964 through the spring or early summer of 1965, were shipped from Dearborn as "knock down" units with "5MEX07C1xxxxx" VIN's -- a format virtually identical to the U.S. VIN's, but with "MEX" replacing the "F" plant code. These were then completed in Mexico ("Armado en Mexico", according to the door data plate).
  • Sometime around June 1965, the "La Villa" plant in Mexico City began producing Mustangs on a more independent basis -- these carried a VIN beginning with "AF", followed by the "07" body code (coupe). Though other data plate codes largely seem to follow the U.S. codes for each model year, Mexico continued using "07" as the VIN body code through at least 1969.
  • Published figures exist only for Shelby de Mexico production:
    <center><table bgcolor="#77AAFF" border="1"> <tbody><tr><th colspan="5">Shelby de Mexico Production</th></tr> <tr valign="top"><th>Year</th><th>Engine</th><th>MM Nov 1987
    <sup>(See Note 1)</sup></th><th>MM Jan 1990</th><th>MF Aug 1990</th></tr> <tr valign="top"><td>1967</td><td>289</td><td align="right">50</td><td align="right">169</td><td align="right">169</td></tr> <tr valign="top"><td>1968</td><td>289</td><td align="right">100+</td><td align="right">203</td><td align="right">203</td></tr> <tr valign="top"><td>1969</td><td>302</td><td align="right">250</td><td align="right">306</td><td align="right"><sup>(Note 2)</sup> 306</td></tr> <tr valign="top"><td>1970</td><td>351</td><td align="right">100</td><td>
    </td><td align="right"><sup>(Note 3)</sup> 1</td></tr> <tr valign="top"><td>1971
    <sup>(See Note 4)</sup></td><td>351W</td><td>
    </td><td>
    </td><td align="right">~200</td></tr> <tr valign="top"><td colspan="5">Notes:
    <sup>1</sup> From an interview with Eduardo Velazquez conducted by Stacy Pendergrass.
    These numbers are probably suspect.
    <sup>2</sup> Also two Shelby de Mexico-built racers, at least one of which used an
    experimental 377ci 450hp engine provided by Carroll Shelby
    <sup>3</sup> Only 1970 Shelby de Mexico built was a racer
    <sup>4</sup> Shelby de Mexico GT-351's </td></tr></tbody></table></center><center>
    </center>
<center>Netherlands

</center>
  • From September 1965 through the end of the 1967 model year, Mustangs were built at the Ford plant in Amsterdam for the European market, with deliveries to (at least) the Netherlands, Belgium, and in 1967, France.

    As in Mexico, the plant assembled only coupes -- production of the lone registered convertible seems to have been "outsourced" to Metuchen after assignment of the Ford International VIN, the car bearing a buck tag stamped with both U.S. and International VINs, with the line for body type, color and trim deleted.

    <center>

    </center> Arjan Nugteren of www.dutchmustang.nl has done extensive research into Ford and Mustang production in Holland.
    With the cooperation of Ford NL, he has discovered and preserved remarkable photos, memos, press releases and even the original floor plans for the Mustang assembly line at the Ford's Amsterdam plant. This ever-growing collection of historical photos, documents and information (much of it translated into English) can be seen on Arjan's website, under the "Archive" and "Ford NL" tabs.
    <center>
    </center>
<center>Venezuela

</center>
  • In October 1966, the Venezuelan Ford plant in Valencia (about 100 miles west-southwest of Caracas) began producing Mustangs, building 231 or 232 (Ford's numbers differ) through the end of December. These vehicles carried VIN's beginning with "AJ", and a body code of "01". Venezuelan production continued through at least 1973.
    The Valencia Mustang Club has transcribed Ford Venezuela's official History of Mustang Production in Venezuela. (English translation courtesy of Babelfish -- the original spanish language page can be found here.
<center>
</center> <center>Peru

</center>
  • Also in 1967, Ford's plant in Lima, Peru began Mustang assembly. These cars featured VIN's beginning with "7-AT07G...", using both the U.S. style leading digit and the Ford international letter ("G") to indicate the model year, along with the 1965-66 holdover "07" body serial code. The cars themselves may also have included some 1966 parts.
<center>
</center> <center><table width="90%"><tbody><tr><td> <center>Mustangs Down Under

</center> More than 200 1965-66 U.S-built Mustangs were converted to Australian specs at a Ford of Australia subcontractor in Homebush (about 10 miles west of Sydney), according to "Aussie Bob" and a Ford Historian in Melbourne, and Colin Falso, owner of one of the 1966 models.

These cars were apparently shipped from one of the U.S. plants, either as pre-assembled vehicles or as "knock-down" units. Ford of Australia then converted them to right-hand drive to meet Australian legal requirements, using a fair number of parts from the existing Australian Falcon and Fairlane assembly lines. A plate was installed on the right (now the driver's side) door sill declaring the vehicles "Made by Ford Australia," and another "Australian Compliance Plate" was affixed to the firewall.

Though the cars had already been counted in U.S. production totals, following their extensive conversion work, Ford considered them "newly assembled," and included them in their annual report of international production figures. Ford of Australia lost most of their early production data when converting over to modern computer systems, but the monthly production totals survived:

<center><table bgcolor="#77AAFF" border="1"> <tbody><tr><td rowspan="2">1965</td><td>Jul</td><td>Aug</td><td>Sep</td><td>Oct</td><td>
</td><td>
</td><td>
</td><td>
</td><td>
</td><td>Total</td></tr> <tr><td align="right">17</td><td align="right">16</td><td align="right">14</td><td align="right">1</td><td align="right">
</td><td align="right">
</td><td align="right">
</td><td align="right">
</td><td align="right">
</td><td align="right">48</td></tr> <tr><td rowspan="2">1966</td><td>Jan</td><td>Feb</td><td>Mar</td><td>Apr</td><td>May</td><td>Jun</td><td>Jul</td><td>Aug</td><td>Sep</td><td>Total</td></tr> <tr><td align="right">4</td><td align="right">22</td><td align="right">34</td><td align="right">26</td><td align="right">20</td><td align="right">18</td><td align="right">17</td><td align="right">19</td><td align="right">1</td><td align="right">161</td></tr> </tbody></table> </center>
Australian Owner Colin Falso of the Victoria Chapter of the Mustang Owner's Club of Australia has provided the following photos, and a copy of the letter he sent to Mustang Monthly's Jerry Heasley, in response to an August 1999 column regarding the Australian Mustangs: (All courtesy Colin Falso, 2001 except *)
<center><table border="0" width="85%"> <tbody><tr><td valign="top">6T07C175320</td><td valign="top">(Built 20 December 1965 for export to Ford of Australia and conversion to "AA07FY75320")</td></tr> <tr><td valign="top">Modified Firewall</td><td valign="top">(During Restoration)</td></tr> <tr><td valign="top">Engine Compartment</td><td valign="top">(Restored)</td></tr> <tr><td valign="top">Ford of Australia VIN tag</td><td valign="top">
</td></tr> <tr><td valign="top">Ford of Australia VIN tag</td><td valign="top">(Detail)</td></tr> <tr><td valign="top">Australian Mustang*</td><td valign="top">
</td></tr> <tr><td valign="top">Original Invoice</td><td valign="top">(Trading in a Falcon for a 1966 Mustang from "J.R. Wotherspoon & Co.: Departmental Stores, General Merchants, Licensed Grocers, Insurances" -- and Mustang Sales ?!?)</td></tr> <tr><td valign="top">Original Registration Certificate</td><td valign="top">
</td></tr> <tr><td valign="top">Dealer Service Receipt</td><td valign="top">(Showing a sale date of 30 September 1965)</td></tr></tbody></table>
</center> Further information regarding these cars -- or on surviving examples -- would be greatly appreciated.
<hr> Update: 2 March 2009: Ian Fagernes of Queensland, Australia reports:

  • I was reading your article in the January edition of Mustang Monthly regarding only one car being located to date. I myself have one of these vehicles. I purchased the vehicle from the original family owners (Surname: Woolmer). The vehicle was purchased from Metropolitan Motors, Brisbane, Queensland in 1966.
    Regards,
    Ian Fagernes
Mr. Fagernes was also kind enough to provide photos proving, as Colin Falso had already suggested in his letter to Jerry Heasley that these right-hand-drive Mustangs began life as conventional Metuchen-built and serialized export cars before being shipped, fully assembled, to Australia, where they were converted and renumbered. Thus 6T07C165347 with Wimbledon White exterior, Red interior, 289-2V, C-4 Automatic and 2.80:1 open rear, assembled on or about 6 December 1965, was shipped "down under" to become AA07FY65347 in February 1966.

Note that the last five digits of the U.S. VIN are incorporated into the Ford of Australia VIN, and that the Australian VIN appears to follow the standard Ford International format. From this we can infer that another Australian Mustang referenced in documents provided by Colin Falso -- AA07EG62645 -- was probably originally serialized at Metuchen as 5T07C162645 around 10 May 1965 and converted at Homebush in August 1965. This also suggests several other cars listed in Jim Smart & Jim Haskell's The Mustang Production Guide, Volume 1 were very probably Homebush Mustangs:

  • AA07FY41563* / 6T07C141563 (C-Code, C-4, 2.80:1, US D.S.O. 95 VIN from TMPGv1, Owner reported as Barry Brown of Australia)
    AA07FY65343* / 6T07C165343 (C-Code, C-4, 2.80:1, US D.S.O. 95 VIN from TMPGv1, Owner reported as John Nixon of Australia)
    AA07FY75316* / 6T07C175316 (C-Code, C-4, 2.80:1, US D.S.O. 95 VIN from TMPGv1, Owner reported as Colleen Lucas Melville of Australia)
    AA07FY75330* / 6T07C175330 (C-Code, C-4, 2.80:1, US D.S.O. 95 VIN from TMPGv1, Owner reported as Denis Deguara of Australia)

    *Australian VIN inferred.
Wolfgang Kohrn also has two articles on his Ponysite.de website regarding official Ford of Australia Mustang conversions. The first concerns a pair of 1971 GT 351s, one of which -- AA02LC36584 -- has now been located, and the second profiles 1969 SportsRoof AA07JH70809 / 9T02S170809.

<center>This data has now been incorporated into a South of the Border Australian Mustang registry.</center>
(Note: Colin Falso has collected data on at least 25 surviving Homebush cars. Unfortunately this data cannot be published as the original owners have not given their consent.)
<hr> Update: 18 April 2009: Geoff B. of New South Wales, Australia, reports:

  • I own 1F02R136584 (AA02LC36584) which is the 1971 351 Boss Mustang referred to on yours and Wolfgang's websites, so this is just a quick email to fill in some of the vacant spots on your register. Prior to my ownership there was a lot of misinformation circulating about this Boss, gradually through a lot of research and speaking directly with previous owners I have been able to gain a more factual background of the cars history, although I still have a large section missing from the original sale date in Jan 71 through to 1988. As the information has become available to me, I have been updating Wolfgang so most of the information there is correct.

    The Boss was ordered on a Single Item Dealer Order (SIDO) 124915 on the 21 Sept 70 by Peter Warren Ford of Liverpool, Sydney, NSW for retail to its first owner, possibly a Ford Executive.
    • Serialized on the 26 Oct 70
      Bucked on the 6 Nov 70
      Scheduled for build on the 9 Nov 70
      Invoice prepared on the 9 Nov 70 (original invoice now in my possession)
      Actually built on the 12 Nov 70
      Released for shipping on the 21 Nov 70
      Shipped to FOMOCO NY Harbour for export 21 Nov 70
    This and its sister Boss 1F02R136586 became the first two 71 Boss 351's to be exported, both coming to Australia, 136586 is believed to have been damaged about 30 years ago and has been garaged ever since and is unlikely to be ever repaired.

    The Boss was retailed to the original owner on the 3 Feb 1971 by Peter Warren Ford of Liverpool, Sydney, NSW.
    From here very little is known of the Boss's history until 19 Nov 1984 when it was registered in the state of Victoria for the first time, unfortunately official records don't go back past 1984. In 1988 it was sold to Nick M, then in 1994 to Noel K, then in 2005 to Josef K, then to me in 2007.
    I do have information regarding the 1984 to 1988 period but have yet to confirm these issues. But the search goes on. My main agenda at this stage is to make the Boss mechanically sound, this has taken some time but has led to increased reliability which is now allowing us to enjoy it more often.
    Cheers,
    Geoff B
<hr> Update: 23 August 2009: John Pfeffer of Brisbane, Australia reports:

  • I just found your site and felt I should advise of my 66 Coupe which has been in my family for its entire life and is one of the Australian RHD converted vehicles. The VIN is AA07FU32512. The Sido is 701902, I believe the rest are, Model 35671, Paint/Trim IR. Features were: Ivy Green Metallic exterior, Black interior, Heater & Demister, Front Disc Brakes, Wheel Covers, Backup Lights, Seat Belts (Front Only), Radio, Console. Now Galaxy Blue with Torque Thrust mag wheels. It has no A/C, no power steering, no power boosted brakes (but I fitted one later for my mother's sake). It came with the centre console and buckets.

    The car was delivered to my father new by Metropolitan Motors, a Ford dealer in Brisbane in September 1966. The car still carries its original registration number. While Dad purchased several subsequent vehicles including a 1971 Ford Falcon GT, the Mustang was such a special car it remained with us. My Mother drove the car as her daily driver from 1971 until her passing in 1996 when it was passed to me. Having said that, it has never done much mileage and has 141,200 miles on the odometer. It suffered some hail damage in the 1980s and it was decided to repaint the car in its original Ivy Green. Since taking the car over, it seemed appropriate to restore the car and although some consider changing colors not advised, I never really liked the green favouring a nice Ford blue and I conducted a bare metal restoration in early 2001. I chose Ford Galaxy Blue as the colour. I also fitted 15-inch American Racing Torque Thrust wheels around the same time. I have also had the interior predominantly restored.

    Since its restoration, the vehicle has been mostly stored and rarely driven however it always starts and drives quite well considering its age. Given the history I would find it very hard to part with my Mustang. It always gives me great pleasure when I take her for a run. I've never got too involved in the club scene, mostly due to other passions that take care of my available spare time. However, I am quite proud of the car and hope I can justify it occupying a place in my garage for years to come.

    Regards,
    John Pfeffer
Mr. Pfeffer's Mustang was apparently part of another Homebush-bound group built at Metuchen in early April 1966. His car -- U.S. VIN 6T07C232512 -- carried a scheduled build date of 4 April. The Mustang Production Guide, Volume 1 shows two additional DSO 95 Mustangs, both Silver Blue exterior/Blue Vinyl interior, scheduled for the following day:

  • AA07FU32541* / 6T07C232541 (C-Code, C-4, 2.80:1, US D.S.O. 95 VIN from TMPGv1, Owner reported as R.G. Collins of Australia)
    AA07FU32542* / 6T07C232542 (C-Code, C-4, 2.80:1, US D.S.O. 95 VIN from TMPGv1, Owner reported as Robert I. Mason of Australia)

    *Australian VIN inferred.
<center>
</center></td></tr></tbody></table></center>
 

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Yeah I was wrong about the two plants. There was only one.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Lakeside that is exactly the ad, I am wondering if this is legit or not. I have never heard about Mexico manufactured mustangs so I am not sure if he is accurate or just full of it trying to sell a car and his business
 

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Either way it seems like a decent price for a V8 conv't.
From what others say about them only making coupes makes me wonder though, and why not show a pic of the unique data plate
 

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I would check the car out as well. They only made Mexican Hardtops that I've ever seen or heard of. Make sure that the car is not a "converted" car that was originally a hardtop that someone cut the top off also. If it is a true Mexican Mustang, It should have a Mexican Dataplate like one of the ones pictured above as well. Check for that too.

:eek:)

Tony K.
 

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Peruvian Mustangs

I was working in Peru from 1965 t0 1971 (Cerro de Pasco ., La Oroya, Peru). One of the other engineers bought an imported 1965 Coupe. It had the 289, 4-speed and 4-barrel carb. It cost him a bit more than $15K. The roads were pretty rough and the front suspension (inc. shocks) took quite a beating. We would occasionally go to Lima, Peru via the rock and gravel road over Ticlio Pass (15,9xx ft. altitude) where it struggled a bit. When we got to Lima (sea level) that thing would RUN. We visited the Ford plant sometime in 1966. All I remember about the Ford plant was a few body parts lying around and partially assembled cars. There was some painting going on (looked like some color changes) and the finished cars, very few, were a bit rough. They did install Peruvian built Goodyear (Goodrich?) tires on them. Those tires were built to run at a relatively low pressure which somewhat resisted the poor road conditions. I also saw one of the 1st 1967 Camaros imported into Peru. We talked to the service manager at the dealer. He told us the car wouldn't leave the showroom for less than $20,000K!!!). I passed. Best regards. John--Las Vegas
 

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Kinda funny he has no picture of data tag. Should start with an AF07. I looked around and I agree looks like all were coups. Looks like guy might not know what he is talking about or is a scammer.
 

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He later posed a picture of the VIN and it decodes to a J-code 68. It doesn't appear to be a number consistent with other Mustangs built in Mexico (starting with "AF") and all of those were hard tops anyway. I think I'll stay away from this one...
 

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I have a 1970 something that has a blank vin plate. It is a convertible and has a motor with "hecho en mexico" cast on the #4 intake 'tube'. My younger brother gave it and a coupe to me prior to his death several years ago. He previosly had the state of Idaho inspector look for a vin # but they were unsuccesful at that time. The car has had a rough life appearing to have had repairs every where. It has what may be a 289-4v motor. Some of the component parts such as the inner fender, have numbers/letters stamped into them, like D1ZBG or D1Z86, difficult to be sure. That is enough for now. I have been looking many places with no real success , this website is the closest to valid info that I have seen thus far. thanks. Bob
 
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