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Discussion Starter #1
More accurately, it wasn't the fusible link itself that melted - it was the connector that attaches it to the rest of the harness, which feeds the entire car.



This connector has always been a little loose - there was always a lot of wiggle room even with the connector housings snapped firmly together. Back in 2014, one day the terminal blades within the connector jostled just far apart enough that the entire car was instantly dead even though the connector still appeared to be fully seated. Yes, I complained to AAW about this and even sent them a video showing them the issue, and they pretty much told me I was delusional and it was suppposed to be like that.

Anyways, since then, I have had a zip tie and a rubber band holding the connector firmly (or not so firmly) together. Except I guess my rubber band disintegrated and I guess the connector jostled apart again, except close enough for the wires to arc maybe... causing the connector to melt. That's as near as I can figure it, at least.

I was going to leave from the gym, cranked Jane up, motor was on for a couple seconds... then everything died (just like the first time) - no motor, no interior lights, no nothing. Checked the battery and it was fine, so the next step was to eyeball that damn link again.. and yep, damn thing's melted. Some random guy from my boxing class gave me a ride to the nearest auto parts store and I picked up a fuse kit with 12 AWG wire. Chopped out the melted connector and wired that in as a temporary replacement for the fusible link and all was good again.

Going to call AAW in the morning and see if they'll send me a new one... and a real connector this time that will stay connected :rolleyes:
 

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Why is a connector needed there? All of the factory Ford fusible links I've seen (there's lots of them on the old 6.9L and 7.3L IDI diesels) were crimped onto the wire they protect. It seems as though you could use a crimp connector to mate the fusible link to the wire and cover it with some shrink tubing.
 

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I agree with awhtx. My AAW kit has the same connector (or at least similar), but the AAW alternator feed also has a fusible link and it has no connector, just a well made splice with a heavy rubber cover from AAW. Not sure why they did it two ways

One question is WHY did the fusible link blow?

Side story, back in 1989, I blew the fusible link on my 70 Nova. How? Being stupid and routed a new starter cable that ended up touching the exhaust manifold (I was 17). Blew the starter cable clean in half and the fusible link. My dad was an electrical engineer, but neither of us had done much work on cars. Could not figure out why no power, and NO GOOGLE! Got with the high school shop teacher who was able to track down the schematics. Then it was an easy fix.
 

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She actually said the fusible link did not blow. The connector melted. Probable cause being the loose connection overheating.
loose connectors of all types are notorious for getting really really, I mean really hot.


PS re the boxing class, are you the student or instructor ?

Either way, I hope you've forgotten and / or forgiven all my Mustang posting mis-deeds.

;) ;) ;)

Z.
 

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She actually said the fusible link did not blow. The connector melted. Probable cause being the loose connection overheating.
So the connector melted in order to save the fusible link?
In my view, the melded connector has nothing to do with there being or not being a fusible link in place. When a loose electrical connection opens up slightly to the”right” gap, the result is a miniature arc welder as the current jumps the gap.

Hot enough to melt plastic easily. I’ve had MSD coil towers melt from the same phenomenon.

Z
 

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If AAW won't give you one, I don't think I'd buy it. Use a Megafuse instead, rated at whatever the link is.
Carry a spare in the the car .... Ya might be able to fit it somwhere with all the other stuff ya carry. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I had the same question when I got the kit, Alan/Tallguy! As far as I could figure, they made the fusible link separate with a connector because the rest of the harness has to route through the firewall so maybe they just figured it was easier to connect separately on the other side in the engine bay. Or who knows.

When you say crimp connector, do you mean just a normal solid crimp? Not something that has a terminal end that actually makes it connector, but rather a splice? I am inclined to do that.

You can see from this close-up that the melting was just at the connector. No damage on the wiring itself upstream or downstream. I assume that the connector melted, the connection was lost, and then the car was dead.

 

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When you say crimp connector, do you mean just a normal solid crimp? Not something that has a terminal end that actually makes it connector, but rather a splice?
Yes ma'm, that's what I mean.
A fusible link is normally 4 numbers smaller than the wire it is protecting so if your main power feed wire is 10 gauge for instance, you would use a fusible link of 14 gauge.
Where and what does the fusible link connect to on the other end- the battery side of the fender mounted solenoid with a ring terminal?
You have cut out the damaged connector. Is there enough wire available to connect the fusible link and the power wire together with any type of metal crimp fitting? You have some non-insulated crimp connectors. Are they large enough to fit on the main power wire? You could actually use a piece of aluminum or copper tubing about 3/8" long to make a crimp connector. As long as the metal is soft enough to squeeze with a crimping tool it will work. Just strip the insulation off the wire and the fusible link, overlap the 2 wires and crimp the tubing in place. Be sure to slide a piece of shrink wrap over one of the wires before crimping them. I would use two pieces of shrink wrap. Shrink one piece in place and then shrink the other piece, covering the first piece so that you have a double layer.
If you don't have enough slack in the wire to reach the fusible link you can buy fusible link wire in a roll. Just crimp a ring terminal on one end to connect to the solenoid and then cut off enough to reach the power wire. Fusible link wire has gray insulation. I don't know if the actual wire is anything special (like the infamous pink wire) or if it is just standard copper wire that melts if overloaded due to it being smaller than the power wire it protects.
 

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In general Kelly, Melted connectors, terminal ends and fuse holders indicate a weakness that high current will be exploit by melting.It can be a result from being loose, corroded, or a poor crimp. Then there is a possibility of poor design requirements for a high current circuit . In regards to your GM packard connector probly is a poor choice for all the current your cars drawing. I would bypass the connector. Cut the wires back until fresh clean conductor is exposed solder and heat shrink a section of wire in place. After the repair you need to see how much current is passing thru your circuit. It may be under rated for all your options you have installed and need a retrofit to accomidate your "current" needs.
 
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