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Welcome to my Nine Hecks. This was the entire reason I stopped working on the Mustang after I spent 3 of my 5 vacation days on it. First day was spent tearing everything down (brake lines, MC, drums, discs, etc.). Felt oddly like I was on Monster Garage. So my first mistake was taking the MC off the firewall. Took 5 different wrenches and many hand positions to get it out. My Dad told me that night that I could have used a socket and an extension. Oh well, that was only an hour or so and a minor scratch on the hand. No big deal Then we get to the disc brakes up front. Four piston style. Which means nothing to me. Dad said there were 2 bolts that you could take out to remove the entire assembly. Well, I removed the wrong 2 bolts and ended up with just 2 pistons and 1 caliper. That’s when it started. He showed me how to use the air hose to blow out the pistons. Looked easy enough. He left for work, I continued to dig my hole deeper. I removed the rest of the brakes (the other caliper half) and tried to “pop them out” with the air hose. No dice. So I figured I’d try some channel locks. We used them on one of the other pistons and it came out pretty easy. So I got 7 of the 8 pistons out fairly easy. A few had some bite marks from the pliers, but all were on the top edge of the piston and wouldn’t even touch the caliper. Then comes piston number 8. I got it out after an hour of heavy work. That work included all the standard “******* tools of death.” Carpenter’s hammer, rubber mallet, long flat blade screwdriver, short flat blade screwdriver, really short flat blade screwdriver, vise, liquid wrench, channel locks, and of course profanity. I even tried to take the grinder to it and some emory cloth to salvage it. No dice. It looks really bad. Won’t even fit in the caliper bad.

So the end result was old calipers that were rusted pretty well (where the piston slides). 10 years in the making on that one. Some bad pistons. One really bad piston. The new ones are on order from CJ’s.

Total cost to me: A few man-hours.
Total cost to my Dad: A couple hundred dollars.

TK

PS - Here's the LINK to my previous post with more details on my 3 days of fun.
 

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TK,look at the knowlege you have gained! Thats how alot of good peaple have learned there trades,as long as you are learning it will be ok! Hang in there! FastE
 

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Gone but never forgetten
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Don't really see any doofus hear, just lots of good lessons. Two lessons, that I can't tell if you learned yet ... if you have to use vice grips (or similar) to get the pistons out, if they weren't toast before, they are now. Even if the bite marks are at the top, they won't seal and slide right.

Lesson 2: BE VERY CAREFUL REMOVING THE PISTONS WITH COMPRESSED AIR. That's the normal way to do it, but it is dangerous, none the less. Once I had one come free, ricochet off of the caliper, FLY half way across my 3 car garage (I was in the center of the garage), hit my roll-away tool chest about 2 feet off the ground, ricocheted out into the driveway and finally landed about 15 feet down the driveway. So what I'm saying is ... just be careful. ;) If my fingers had been on the wrong place of the caliper, I wouldn't have them anymore. ::
 

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I use my vise grips for welding. Pretty much everything I get them out for bolt/screw/other wise winds up ruining something...fingers included. Glad you got the postons out, what do the walls look like?
 

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Just some guy
67 coupe, 69 Sportsroof, 86 hatchback
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Sounds like you're learning all about disk brakes, the hard/good way. What you've done sounds all too familiar to me. That's the same way I learned a large part of what I know about mechanics. Still goes on too. When I'm confronted with something new and unfamiliar, I usually get some vague advice and basically have to figure it out myself. Not as many parts get torn up as there used to be, but it's still the same old process as 20 years ago when I was getting started. I've also learned that sometimes badly corroded/damaged parts just won't come apart. Then you just have to chose wich part you are going to sacrifice to try and save the other.
No doofus at all. Sounds like you had a good day in the school of hard knocks. The best school there is for mechanics.
 
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