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When I bought my coupe in June, I knew that I would have to replace the floor pans. I never welded before and I was kinda worried about doing the job myself.
Yesterday I was working on building my new work bench. The frame is based out of steel shelves I had. I thought I could bolt everything together but soon realized that I would need to weld some parts if I wanted it to last. So I made the jump (not without checking this forum for welders recommendations). I went to Lowes and bought a Lincoln Mig 135. I put it together this morning, watched the instructional video and went to work and the bench.
Well I am proud to say that it went pretty well for a first try. My welds don;t look pretty (yet) but I didn't burn thought the metal neither. I had to use the "arc only" method, versus MIG, because at lowes the didn't know anything about the welders so they forgot to tell me I needed a CO2 bottle.
Now I'll practice some more on the MIG set up and I'll give my floor pans a shot (not without checking this board again for tips and tricks of course)
ONE MORE TOOL IN THE GARAGE! ::
 

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You should practice welding very thin metals......big difference
 

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Welcome, Now you'll get to experience all that you can do with a welder :: :: Make sure to get the C25 (Argon/CO2 mix)in the biggest bottle you can afford. MIG is so much nicer for thin sheet metal ::
 

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Yea, thin metals are harder to weld without burning through and more importantly warping. You can usually get some bent steel from a body shop. Cut it up with a cut off wheel and an angle grinder, then weld it back together for practice.

Find a local welding shop and get a bottle of C25 (75% argon, 25% CO2). You'll probably have to buy the bottle so get a decent sized one, the price for the bottle and for refills scales down as you get bigger (ie. it doesn't cost twice as much to fill a 150 as it does a 75) so you save money in the long run with a bigger bottle.

If your Lincoln kit came with one of those hand held lenses get a flip down helmet while you're at the welding shop. A Jackson helmet with a number 10 lens should run less than $25 and will work well for your purposes. I like to use a number 9 lens for welding thinner metals (22-18 gauge) with lower amperage so you may want to pick one of those up too.

Now that you've got a welder in the shop you'll wonder how you lived without it. Good luck!
 

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That's the same welder I have. Good advice on the mixed gas. That's what you want for MIG. You should also get you a 10 pound spool of wire. That little spool you get with your welder won't last too long once you get started on your floor pans.

I also would HIGHLY recommend an auto darkening welding helmet. You will get varying advice on this...but bottom line is...when you're learning how to weld you need to use two hands (one to hold the torch...the other to steady the torch). That shield you got with your welder that you hold in your hand is pretty much useless. If you're not an experienced welder, it is MUCH easier to learn if you can see where you are starting...and that's where an autodarkening helmet comes in.

I bought one of the cheap solar powered ones and I love it.

Good Luck!

Phil
 
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