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1967 Mustang coupe
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Discussion Starter #1
Hi All
So I'm replacing my rear brakes, y'all helped me eval the old in a recent post, and now I'm replacing them. But i have some issues. So I thought I'd start asking.

I bought the off the shelf rear drum set of self adjuster, springs and pads. But I see some inconsistencies between what i have and what I got.

The pads are riveted, my old ones arent, no biggie. The underlying HW looks exactly the same, however the pads dont fully engage the drum. In the pic you can see I press the center and the edges are not in contact. I guess that'll just wear down the high spot and soon I'll have full contact, but it was unexpected. Also, I found that my self adjuster cable is too long, and that's the reason my self adjusters dont work. The plate lies too low and does not engage the star. This can be clearly seen when comparing my placement to the manual's. Not sure if there is any differences here because of my 4lugs?

There was a harsh lip on the seats of the pads, and since I can't weld and will have to find a place that can, I just filed off the lip and am hoping for the best for now.

Finally the spring for the equalizer bar is the only one I have damaged, and it was not in my spring kit. Doh! So I put the largest piece back on.

any suggestions and comments are appreciated.
DrC
 

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1967 Mustang coupe
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Discussion Starter #2
well, the right side has a left self adjuster. So even if it WAS working (the adjuster cable is also too long), it's be loosending instead of tightening. That would explain the total lack of brakage on that side...
 

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Just some general comments-
You'd either want to arch the shoes to the drums or check the drum specs.... might need to replace them.
Look at the bottom edge of the left side trailing shoe. You've got cracked material at the rivet. Not a good way to start out.....

ex-Global West GM
1991-1995
 

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well, the right side has a left self adjuster. So even if it WAS working (the adjuster cable is also too long), it's be loosending instead of tightening. That would explain the total lack of brakage on that side...
I think the picture is of the left side and it looks correct to me. (I just redid all 4 of mine two weeks ago and it's still fresh)
 

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The right and left side adjusters differ in that one has right hand threads and the other is left hand threads. You might be able to find a spring (or a pair) online. A damaged spring is better than none for the time being.
 

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1967 Mustang coupe
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Discussion Starter #6
I think the picture is of the left side and it looks correct to me. (I just redid all 4 of mine two weeks ago and it's still fresh)
Correct, that is the left, right is all over the floor :ROFLMAO:

I'm ordering the right side adjuster kit now. should be here this year....
 

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1967 Mustang coupe
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Discussion Starter #7
So I measured my cable and checked the manual. My cable is 8.80" long. Manual says it should be 8.4" (8 13/32). So I'm going to tie a knot in the steel cable close to the eye end and see if that shortens it enough. I'll install the backward threaded adjuster for now until my parts arrive next week. Then we'll see how this goes.
763842
 

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This is why the brake shoe grinder was invented.

However, since the dangers of breathing the dust became apparent, they have largely disappeared. I have one. It re-arches the braking surface to match your drum perfectly. Done correctly, you will have no break-in period at all. Assembled as you show, it will take hundreds, perhaps thousands, of miles to get full effectiveness from your brakes. Not a comforting thought.
 

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There was a harsh lip on the seats of the pads, and since I can't weld and will have to find a place that can, I just filed off the lip and am hoping for the best for now.
That's a good reason to buy or borrow a small welder. Heck, I have an old Sears buzz box in the garage that could fix those grooves.
 

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You have 9" brakes. maybe the cable was for a 10" brake.

Rear drum brakes only need replacing every 5-10 years. When I did mine, I pulled the axles and did seals and bearings. I had a local muffler shop weld the guides and grind them down for me. They charged me $20. A local machine shop charged me $20 to swap out the bearings.

Im good for another 50 years.
 

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This is why the brake shoe grinder was invented.

However, since the dangers of breathing the dust became apparent, they have largely disappeared. I have one. It re-arches the braking surface to match your drum perfectly. Done correctly, you will have no break-in period at all. Assembled as you show, it will take hundreds, perhaps thousands, of miles to get full effectiveness from your brakes. Not a comforting thought.

So, obviously the brake shoe grinder is The way to go. Then you state, due to asbestos, in a round about way, nobody does this anymore. So, as I've found out recently, you have got to buy new commie drums and hope for the best. You offered a solution not available to 99% of the people on this forum. I guess I would have responded, back in the day we had brake shoe grinders..... But your most likely SOL!
 

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A little bit of gap at the end of the shoes is normal and fine in my experience. The shoes will bed in, and they do have some flex under braking IMO. I would check your drum diameter is within specs.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Rear drum brakes only need replacing every 5-10 years. When I did mine, I pulled the axles and did seals and bearings.

Im good for another 50 years.
What a great point. Good to put this in perspective. Fix it once, right, and you're good for a looooooooong time. I think I'll order another new drum and wait for the right parts and just do it right all around.
 

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I believe the daze of asbestos are long gone. You can take some sand paper and fit it to the drum and arc the shoes yourself if you want. I would probably wear a mask just to keep from breathing the fibers that come off as who knows what they are made of these days and what they will be telling us 20 years later about having inhaled it.
 

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I didn't see a photo of the backing plate with the shoes off. I was expecting to see a deep wear gouge where the side shoe pads ride against the backing plate. Is that what you are referring to that needs welded and smoothed out? That was what I was expecting to see from the picture where the upper rear shoe looked out of position. I am now curious about my own back drum brakes as I was not smart enough to set the shoe in it and look at the gaps although I did do a little work on the backing plate !!
 

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So, obviously the brake shoe grinder is The way to go. Then you state, due to asbestos, in a round about way, nobody does this anymore. So, as I've found out recently, you have got to buy new commie drums and hope for the best. You offered a solution not available to 99% of the people on this forum. I guess I would have responded, back in the day we had brake shoe grinders..... But your most likely SOL!
Well, checking around will likely find you a shop that can do it. Frankly, if you can't find one, I'd take the high spot down with a belt sander before I'd use them like that. At least then you'd have a shorter break-in.
 
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Well, checking around will likely find you a shop that can do it. Frankly, if you can't find one, I'd take the high spot down with a belt sander before I'd use them like that. At least then you'd have a shorter break-in.
Sadly, it's been 20 years since the local NAPA closed the machine shop in the back that did such things.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I didn't see a photo of the backing plate with the shoes off. I was expecting to see a deep wear gouge where the side shoe pads ride against the backing plate. Is that what you are referring to that needs welded and smoothed out? That was what I was expecting to see from the picture where the upper rear shoe looked out of position. I am now curious about my own back drum brakes as I was not smart enough to set the shoe in it and look at the gaps although I did do a little work on the backing plate !!
Here's the shot of the post-filing seats. You can see the bottom one is the worst. I removed the lip, but a big groove remains.
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Here's the shot of the post-filing seats. You can see the bottom one is the worst. I removed the lip, but a big groove remains.
Yeah, that ain't good.
 
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