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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hey Gang! Best thing I ever did was join this group. Great info and thanks to all masters out there helping us “newbies”. Recap...1966 200 i6. Been cleaning surfaces and things are looking good. Lots of talk about gaskets and sealants but some advice might not pertain to my year and engine. I would like to ask if someone has a rundown of the following components and what the proper gasket material and sealer they would advise for this car. Here we go....

Valve cover
Thermostat housing
Water pump
Fuel pump
Oil pan
Carburetor
Carburetor spacer

I have quite a few gaskets but some are different materials....also have a tube of Permatex Ultra Blue and Permatex High Tack Gasket Sealant but of course will go out and get what is right.

Also...new bolts and hardware and plan on using torque specs from original shop manual.

BONUS QUESTION.....oil pump to block...when removed did not have a gasket but new pump has been purchased. Have gasket for pick up tube but cannot find a gasket for top of pump to block. Need one?

As always...thanks for your input!
 

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Just some guy
67 coupe, 69 Sportsroof, 86 hatchback
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I wouldn't use any. Four "dots" of RTV at the corners of the oil pan like on a V8 but that's it. As far as I know the factory never found it necessary to use any sealer and when these cars were new they didn't leak. Modern gaskets are usually much better than they were back then, so...

I find sealers much overused. I bought a Bronco once that had been essentially killed by someone being way overenthusiastic with the RTV during various repairs. All the bearings were destroyed and when I pulled the oil pump pickup there were literal strings of RTV hanging out of it.
Years back, about the umpteenth time I sliced my hand trying to chisel rock hard cork valve cover gaskets out because someone thought they needed to be glued in I swore I would never ever use "weatherstrip cement" on any engine gasket ever. I also got to where I believed cork should only be used for notice boards and to stopper wine bottles.

I can and will indeed use sealers, but only if they are actually needed. IE, a high quality gasket won't quite do the job it's meant to for some reason. If you are using substandard (cheap) gaskets for some reason then sometimes they need help. In some antique/rare applications you have little choice.
 

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My personal preferences below:

I only use Fel-Pro Brand Gaskets ever.

Valve cover - Rubber Gasket, not Cork.... - Thin line of Permatex Ultrablue or UltraBlack
Thermostat housing - Paper, Cardboard or Fiber Gasket - Thin line of Permatex Ultrablue or UltraBlack
Water pump - Paper, Cardboard or Fiber Gasket - Thin line of Permatex Ultrablue or UltraBlack
Fuel pump - Paper, Cardboard or Fiber Gasket - No Sealant used.
Oil pan - Rubber Gasket, not Cork.... - Thin line of Permatex Ultrablue or UltraBlack
Carburetor - Paper, Cardboard or Fiber Gasket - No Sealant used.
Carburetor spacer - Paper, Cardboard or Fiber Gasket - No Sealant used.

Some people like and use the Original Cork Gaskets..... I am definately NOT one of those crowd. I got tired of cleaning cork gasket material off of my engines and finding bits and pieces of them in my oil pans and oil valleys. When they came out with the Rubber Gaskets in the 1980's, I was ecstatic...and have been ever since.

:eek:)

Tony K.
 

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Felpro gaskets and "The Right Stuff" gasket maker are all I use. Don't use any type of silicon/gasket maker on the carburetor or spacer gasket.
 

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I use Fel=Pro gaskets and a thin coat of Permatex gasket maker RTV.
https://www.amazon.com/Permatex-821...ocphy=9027204&hvtargid=pla-432399660406&psc=1

On these 70 yo engines, there is going to be some pitting so, you have to use some sealer along with the gaskets in some areas. If I am installing a new component such as a water pump, I spray the side of the gasket that goes to the pump with 3M weatherstrip adhesive to hold it in place and then apply a thin coat of rtv. I also glue the gasket to the valve cover and oil pan . I dont use any sealant on valve covers and only a little in each corner of the oil pan. No sealant on the thermostat housing unless it is pitted. I usually spray a copper sealant on each side of the head gaskets. I use a thin coat of RTV around the water jackets on the heads and intake on both sides of the gasket (very thin ). I glue the front and rear intake seals to the block and use RTV on each corner there also along with a thin bead of RTV along the top side. Everyone has their own practices when to comes to gaskets and sealants. What works for me may not work for you. The best gaskets, clean surfaces, and a torque wrench are your best friends. Work fast but carefully as not to pinch or roll the gaskets.
 

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The Permatex UltraBlue and UltraBlack are all I ever use... I would never use the Regular RTV...even if Permatex was the maker....but that's just me. I don't like any regular RTV Sealant.

Permatex Does make a "HIGH TACK" Black "Brush-On" Gasket Sealant for head gaskets....and it's fantastic stuff...No leaks! I've used it for decades.. The Part Number is Permatex #98H-80062, or just #80062.

:eek:)

Tony K.
 
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I use (and have used for the last 45 years) one primary gasket sealant, Permatex Aviation Form-a-Gasket. I WILL, on occasion, use Permatex Ultra Black RTV on spots where cork & rubber meet or where there are 2 gaskets and an exposed parting line.

Examples are between the cork end seals and intake manifold gaskets, same on the oil pan between the cork sides and rubber ends...but just a "dot".

The factory didn't use RTV and these cars didn't leak on the showroom or lot floor, and you darn well believe that people wouldn't put up with them leaking on their garage floor or driveway!

I try to use Victor-Reinz (Mahle) gaskets where I can get them.
 

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Just some guy
67 coupe, 69 Sportsroof, 86 hatchback
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The engine killing RTV "strings" come from where two surfaces come together and the RTV squeezes out the sides. If you see some squeezing out then some is also squeezing "in". THAT is where the strings come from, they don't stay attached in the long run. They'll end up in your radiator or your oil pump pickup, neither is good. I don't know any qualified professional mechanics that advocate coating any gaskets with silicone, most technical publications and seminar holders advise people NOT to do that. But if you just have to at least make sure none is squeezing out. Use as little as possible if you just can't do "none". But folks, they're your engines. I'm retired from buying dead-engined vehicles that others have abused and rehabbing them so I'm not hunting any more such deals. I sure made some money on more than a few such over the years though. That said, you can "get away" with a lot of things on a car that only gets driven a dozen times a year or something. A daily driver is going to suffer more and problems tend to rear their heads in months instead of years. This long term stuff matters to me. My main motorcycle I bought in 1987 (with a bad engine), it was 13 years old then. Still the main ride. One daily driver truck I've had since Katrina, 14 years, and it's 38 year sold now. (Bought with a bad engine) The younger daily driver truck (I switch back and forth) I've only had about 10 years now I guess. It's 24 (bought with a bad and abused engine). '67 Mustang for over 20 years. It's engine wasn't actually bad, just ignored way too long. Wife's once driver is an '86, previous owner had no concept of oil changes. Forgot the youngun', wife's driver is 18 now and also was a previous victim of bad/no maintenance.
You kill'em, I revive 'em. And then KEEP them going. For as long as I want. Between the four main vehicles in my driveway right now are almost a million miles. And every one rescued and bought cheap because of it.
 
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I have taken a different path. No sealant on gaskets for me on gaskets except the following:

1) Oil pan gasket sealant on the corners (I have a one piece rubber type gasket)

2) Intake Manifold - no sealer on intake gaskets but used Permatex Ultra Gray in the corners and top and bottom of the cork end pieces. Why not throw away the cork like people say? Well when I tried just using Permatex it is a thick bead and when I had to remove my intake two weeks later it was still not dry (not even close in the middle). So this time I used the cork and it will be just fine.

Not sealant on the water pump, timing cover, water neck, head gaskets, valve covers (I have rubber style), carb, fuel pump, oil pump/pickup and whatever else I can't think of.

The newer gaskets call for no sealant in the instructions. Of course if you have a sub standard surface you may decide it best to use a little sealant to fill the voids. Time will tell if I get leaks but not a drop during cam break in.

One other thing to consider is to torque everything properly and clean the surfaces prior to installing gaskets
 

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I use (and have used for the last 45 years) one primary gasket sealant, Permatex Aviation Form-a-Gasket. I WILL, on occasion, use Permatex Ultra Black RTV on spots where cork & rubber meet or where there are 2 gaskets and an exposed parting line.

Examples are between the cork end seals and intake manifold gaskets, same on the oil pan between the cork sides and rubber ends...but just a "dot".
For me those cork intake end gaskets go in the trash and a bead of RTV is used. A dot of RTV is used at joint between cork and rubber oil pan gaskets. A thin coat of Gask-a-Cinch is used to hold gaskets in place.(oil pan, fuel pump, rear end)

Nothing on carb gaskets, ever.
 
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Just some guy
67 coupe, 69 Sportsroof, 86 hatchback
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Note to original poster, ignore all the extraneous "intake end gasket" sidetrack discussions. They have NOTHING to do with the engine you are currently working on.
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
My personal preferences below:

I only use Fel-Pro Brand Gaskets ever.

Valve cover - Rubber Gasket, not Cork.... - Thin line of Permatex Ultrablue or UltraBlack
Thermostat housing - Paper, Cardboard or Fiber Gasket - Thin line of Permatex Ultrablue or UltraBlack
Water pump - Paper, Cardboard or Fiber Gasket - Thin line of Permatex Ultrablue or UltraBlack
Fuel pump - Paper, Cardboard or Fiber Gasket - No Sealant used.
Oil pan - Rubber Gasket, not Cork.... - Thin line of Permatex Ultrablue or UltraBlack
Carburetor - Paper, Cardboard or Fiber Gasket - No Sealant used.
Carburetor spacer - Paper, Cardboard or Fiber Gasket - No Sealant used.

Some people like and use the Original Cork Gaskets..... I am definately NOT one of those crowd. I got tired of cleaning cork gasket material off of my engines and finding bits and pieces of them in my oil pans and oil valleys. When they came out with the Rubber Gaskets in the 1980's, I was ecstatic...and have been ever since.

:eek:)

Tony K.
Tony, question for you. Your wrote...

“Oil pan - Rubber Gasket, not Cork.... - Thin line of Permatex Ultrablue or UltraBlack”

Do you know where I can get this gasket for my i6? Also is it the one piece rubber gasket? I’ve looked all over and even the Summit guy gave me a weird look when I asked. I used a cork one just for now to get the engine running...which we did a few days ago! Smoked out the neighborhood for a little bit but smoothed out quickly and after 30 years of sitting still she is alive again! Thanks!
 

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This was a great morning read with my coffee. I will be performing several winter jobs requiring gaskets. Thanks for the data and stories to support your discussion.

Thanks again
 

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One very important thing that I can tell you all about the most important gasket is the Head Gasket. The Fel-Pro made Head gaskets use what's called a "Perm-A-Seal" Orange Seal line and its printed right on the gasket "USE NO SEALER". Don't believe it for one second. Their "Perm-A-Seal" Orange Seal line sealing technology on the gasket DOES NOT WORK...and your head gasket will leak like a sieve over time (A very short time I might add)... You MUST USE a SEALER like the Permatex "HIGH TACK" Gasket Sealer if you do not want the head to leak coolant. The coolant passages on the Ford I6 144, 170-200cid engine are very close to the Driver's side wall and Rear of the I6's head...and if you do not coat the head gasket with a good Sealant, It will leak in no time flat. I put a light coating of the Permatex "HIGH TACK" Gasket Sealer on both sides of the Head Gasket and then torque it down....and then its good to go for at least the next 20 years...or more.. Just a very important FYI....

Almost every I6 170-200 cid engine I see at shows has evidence of coolant leaks on the Driver's side and Rear of the I6 engine. Do what I said above and you can avoid that...

:eek:)

Tony K.
 

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Just some guy
67 coupe, 69 Sportsroof, 86 hatchback
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Their "Perm-A-Seal" Orange Seal line sealing technology on the gasket DOES NOT WORK...
I don't do much straight six work but I can believe this. Their exact same style of gaskets for V8 intakes have that same orange seal on the water passages which also doesn't work. I still use them but now I coat the water port areas with Permatex Aviation Gasket sealer for a REALLY leakproof seal. I would absolutely do the same on a 200 head gasket as Tony suggests.
 

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One very important thing that I can tell you all about the most important gasket is the Head Gasket. The Fel-Pro made Head gaskets use what's called a "Perm-A-Seal" Orange Seal line and its printed right on the gasket "USE NO SEALER". Don't believe it for one second. Their "Perm-A-Seal" Orange Seal line sealing technology on the gasket DOES NOT WORK...and your head gasket will leak like a sieve over time (A very short time I might add)... You MUST USE a SEALER like the Permatex "HIGH TACK" Gasket Sealer if you do not want the head to leak coolant. The coolant passages on the Ford I6 144, 170-200cid engine are very close to the Driver's side wall and Rear of the I6's head...and if you do not coat the head gasket with a good Sealant, It will leak in no time flat. I put a light coating of the Permatex "HIGH TACK" Gasket Sealer on both sides of the Head Gasket and then torque it down....and then its good to go for at least the next 20 years...or more.. Just a very important FYI....

Almost every I6 170-200 cid engine I see at shows has evidence of coolant leaks on the Driver's side and Rear of the I6 engine. Do what I said above and you can avoid that...

:eek:)

Tony K.
Great advice! This was done on my last build and all is leak free.
 

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I don't do much straight six work but I can believe this. Their exact same style of gaskets for V8 intakes have that same orange seal on the water passages which also doesn't work. I still use them but now I coat the water port areas with Permatex Aviation Gasket sealer for a REALLY leakproof seal. I would absolutely do the same on a 200 head gasket as Tony suggests.
Ha! In Pantera circles, everyone refers to the FelPro 351C intake manifold gaskets as "Print-O-Leak" gaskets, because they're guaranteed to fail in short order if used without sealer.
 
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