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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello all, i have always wanted to own a 1968 mustang and went to local garage that claims that he can restores them and make them road legal (not in US), so initially i didnt research the project throughly and now at a later stage i just feel that i have been tricked. Im worried about the car body if it can last long and if it is safe to handle a coyote engine with such condition as i will be using the car daily. I will share different photos from different stages and please let me know if it is ok to proceed or such work need to replaced entirely, as my mechanic (different garage) is almost done with everything else “MEP”
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1970 Ford Mustang, Windsor 302 V8, C4 Automatic Transmission, Holley 600 Carburetor
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There are people on this forum who have done coyote swaps to their older mustangs. It can be done in an older mustang, but more experienced people on here probably know what is involved. They will probably be willing to give you advice as you go into the build more. Additionally, there are previous threads on this forum before you that probably will detail someone else's journey going along the same path as you are with your mustang. Good luck!
 

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Not sure I understand, you are posting pictures of 2 different cars(unless there was a fastback conversion done to a coupe). The coupe looks to have severely rotted framerails that have been removed. Looks to me as if there is significant rust to repair on the coupe...once repaired the car will be fine...but all structural rust must be fixed first.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Not sure I understand, you are posting pictures of 2 different cars(unless there was a fastback conversion done to a coupe). The coupe looks to have severely rotted framerails that have been removed. Looks to me as if there is significant rust to repair on the coupe...once repaired the car will be fine...but all structural rust must be fixed first.
Yes its the same car but (coupe converted) as you said. Now the photo that you noticed where the frame rail was replaced is the final one i took and traveled just to come back to a fully primer car. My worries are if the car remained in that condition and he use primer , should i have concern and stop progressing with MEP work?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
There are people on this forum who have done coyote swaps to their older mustangs. It can be done in an older mustang, but more experienced people on here probably know what is involved. They will probably be willing to give you advice as you go into the build more. Additionally, there are previous threads on this forum before you that probably will detail someone else's journey going along the same path as you are with your mustang. Good luck!
Noted and thank you but coyote swap is working fine for me in terms of MEP, im just concerned about wether this body (shell) will have safety issues in that condition
 

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1970 Ford Mustang, Windsor 302 V8, C4 Automatic Transmission, Holley 600 Carburetor
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Noted and thank you but coyote swap is working fine for me in terms of MEP, im just concerned about wether this body (shell) will have safety issues in that condition
There are different modifications out there to improve the safety of the body if that's what you are worried about. Shock Tower Braces, and Monte Carlo bars are also a thing.
 

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Based upon the pictures it looks like a lot of effort was put into rebuilding the front of the car back to a stock configuration. If you're serious about a Coyote transplant, a significant amount of the front end will need to be altered to accommodate the engine. The shock towers will need to be removed, for instance, and when that is done you will need to select an appropriate front suspension and cross member. Then you will most likely have to modify the firewall and the transmission tunnel. Here what mine looked like before mocking up the engine:

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You can actually retain the shock towers for a Coyote swap if you notch them(for 67+ at least):



The downside to notching towers is that you either have to go with a strut suspension, get creative with UCA mounting, or make some custom headers(or some combination of the above). To me its a wash between a McPhereson strut-type suspension and a MII suspension anyway...neither is a great option, if it were me I would go custom headers and some shorter UCAs.

To answer the original question though...the structural work looks fine from the few picturs you have posted. I would not worry about the integrity.

Its just going to be a lot more work before a Coyote fits. The Coyote swap is overrated honestly, a 351W will give you all the power you could want. At this point you can't even swap a Coyote to be "different" since its 2nd only to LS engine swaps as a common choice.
 

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Spark, forgive me, I am bad at flags--- Unted Arab Emirates ? Whats MEP ? As to being tricked, well, maybe, but I am not sure what you were expecting, or who told you what. I WILL SAY, however, your car is most definately NOT anywhere close to being ready for a Coyote engine. I will also say what you have looks nice, and cutting up a nice car, doing the required butchery to fit a Coyote, is really kinda silly. You have LOTS of normal engine options that DON'T require major surgery. Tell us what you're going to do with the car, and how much power you want, and what fuel you are going to use, and we'll help you figure it out. LSG
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
There are different modifications out there to improve the safety of the body if that's what you are worried about. Shock Tower Braces, and Monte Carlo bars are also a thing.
Currently the car is in late stage , these photos shows the part that im worried about which is related to structure rust and safety. Will post in few days once im back to my homeland thnx for the advice
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Based upon the pictures it looks like a lot of effort was put into rebuilding the front of the car back to a stock configuration. If you're serious about a Coyote transplant, a significant amount of the front end will need to be altered to accommodate the engine. The shock towers will need to be removed, for instance, and when that is done you will need to select an appropriate front suspension and cross member. Then you will most likely have to modify the firewall and the transmission tunnel. Here what mine looked like before mocking up the engine:

View attachment 840341
Sorry for the confusion, those are older photos if the body and not the current stage of the project will share current stage soon , but my worries are not about the cutting or mechanical work as i handed it over to a realiable local garage. Only the body condition is what worries me in terms if patching older parts , rust durability and safety
 

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Just to cut right to the heart of the matter: There is no 'mystique' to the Coyote engine. It makes decent power, but it's ridiculously wide and carries a lot of its weight up high, which isn't the best for handling.

It's often much easier to put decent heads and parts on a Windsor, spending less and getting more; it's a simpler install, and can easily meet or exceed the power of a Coyote engine.

If you exceed 400 horsepower on a first gen Mustang, you had best be thinking about chassis reinforcement and a roll cage, along with some means to control wheelhop! The unibody structure is not very rigid.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
You can actually retain the shock towers for a Coyote swap if you notch them(for 67+ at least):



The downside to notching towers is that you either have to go with a strut suspension, get creative with UCA mounting, or make some custom headers(or some combination of the above). To me its a wash between a McPhereson strut-type suspension and a MII suspension anyway...neither is a great option, if it were me I would go custom headers and some shorter UCAs.

To answer the original question though...the structural work looks fine from the few picturs you have posted. I would not worry about the integrity.

Its just going to be a lot more work before a Coyote fits. The Coyote swap is overrated honestly, a 351W will give you all the power you could want. At this point you can't even swap a Coyote to be "different" since its 2nd only to LS engine swaps as a common choice.
Thanks for the info and unfortunately its a little too late as these are older photos , coyote work already at late stage and will post photos soon , my main concern was the body (frame, rail ) etc , as i feel the garage the converted my car did not do a decent job and just used primer without treating all the rusty areas which makes difficult for me to spot and was worried about safety and drivability
 

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Spark, post some updated pictures for us when you can. What your pictures show so far looks fine. You most certainly DON'T need a Coyote to get fuel injection. You could have a fuel injected 302 or 331 or 347, which would drop right into what you have without any cutting. Trying to install a Coyote is troublesome and very expensive. Almost everything in the front suspension would have to be changed. How much power are you looking for ? LSG
 

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Its just going to be a lot more work before a Coyote fits. The Coyote swap is overrated honestly, a 351W will give you all the power you could want. At this point you can't even swap a Coyote to be "different" since its 2nd only to LS engine swaps as a common choice.
Agreed... even a 302 based stroker like a 347 will get you at or above 500 hp somewhat easily and relatively safely, which is more than what the Coyote motor comes with in stock form. Plus, I think the Windsor is going to sound much better than the Coyote motor, although EFI wouldn't be a terrible thing, if one really wanted to have it. I see YouTube videos all the time now of guys putting a Coyote motor in their classic mustang or Cobra kit car, and to me it just doesn't sound the same or have the same appeal. My 2c, of course.
 

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Coyote plan came at a late , in my country it’s difficult to maintain carburetor based engine due to heat humidity etc, so fuel injection is the choice
No worries. The Coyote is an great motor and a blast to drive. Dual over head cam motors rev higher and make tons of high end power and torque. But pushrod engines are smaller, simpler to maintain and can make still make big power (though usually on the low end). Its really new school vs old school. So you need to decide WHY you want a Coyote. If its just because of its name sake then you may want to re-think your options. As mentioned Coyotes just don't fit in these cars with out extensive (and expensive) fabrication. There are much cheaper and easier alternatives if your just looking for some added HP.
 
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