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Discussion Starter #1
alright, i recently designed and plumbed my brake system...up front are GM calipers with stainless steel lines, all new, out back its lincoln calipers with rubber lines(the lincoln calipers are old and the brake lines)all the hard lines are new, I bent and flared them all myself...the master cylinder is a remanufactured aluminum unit from an 85 t-bird w/ 7/8" bore....this is a manual brake setup...anyway, I finished plumbing it all today and tried to bleed it...after tracing down about four leaks and fixing them(mainly due to the fittings not being tight enough)I still cant get any pedal pressure....the only used parts in the system are the rear calipers and brake lines...and the stock distribution block which I am using for the front lines(one port blocked off)the rear lines run through a new wilwood proportioning valve...I have speed bleeders at each wheel...I can pump the brake for five minutes at each wheel and no leaks...still cant get any pedal pressure...any ideas?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
heh, just realized I didnt bench bleed te master...I can just disconnect the ports and bench bleed it on the car correct?(I dont see any reason why not)...as for the bleeder valves...in the front they are on top....the backs are horizontal(not exactly the top of the caliper)
 

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Yes. The master doesn't know it's in the car and not on the bench, of course.

Sometimes a little rocking or tapping on the side of the master helps dislodge the last of the bubbles inside though. If it was me, I'd "bench" bleed it on the car at the point you're at.
 

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Sokoloff said:
Yes. The master doesn't know it's in the car and not on the bench, of course.
Not exactly correct. It's not the car vs. the bench, it's about being level. Masters are not generally level when mounted on the car, then throw in that most likely you jacked up the car to remove the tires to get to the calipers etc. Unbolt the two bolts and pull it off.

It needs to be mounted level in a vice (use a bubble not your eyes) I would also recommend that you then tilt the master forward and backward and then side to side to remove any hidden bubbles. You can also hit the side of the master to get the bubbles to rise to the hole. You'll be surprise how much more air you find.

As for the calipers then bleeder hole needs to be straight up from the uppermost part of the reservoir. Some bleeders are on an angle so the hole (not necessarily the bleeder) needs to be in that position.
 

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I chased a brake bleeding problem for a hole freaken month. After buying new parts and what felt like gallons of brake fluid I tried fliping sides with the rear calipers because some people mentioned that my bleeders may not be clocked high enough and by flipping them got the bleeders higher. After doing that I went form 0 pedal pressure to stiff like normal So ya might want to look into those rear calipers after you bend bleed the MC.
 

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jconnor3 said:
I chased a brake bleeding problem for a hole freaken month. After buying new parts and what felt like gallons of brake fluid I tried fliping sides with the rear calipers because some people mentioned that my bleeders may not be clocked high enough and by flipping them got the bleeders higher. After doing that I went form 0 pedal pressure to stiff like normal So ya might want to look into those rear calipers after you bend bleed the MC.
Your in good company on that headache!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
well, its a stock 84 lincoln rear end...obviously they have to be able to bleed them at the factory...I doubt thats the issue...they actually seemed to bleed just fine(spurted a strong stream of brake fluid with only a few pumps) but time to bleed my master...I'll take it off(though the car isnt jacked up right now(I have no fenders on it)
 

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When I did my granada swap I had a couple of issues in getting the petal feel I wanted. Biggest issue I ran into was that the lines going to the prop valve went up slightly after coming out of the MC. Someone suggested this could be the problem because some air was trapped near the MC. After bending them to where the lines go straight out and then straight down to the prop valve I had no problems.

I was also using speed bleeders so I know it wasn't the bleeding process.

On the in-car bleeding of the MC... I got an extra pre-flared tube from the local auto part store, cut it in half to have to pipes, then put the proper fittings for the 2 MC ports, and bent the tubing to return the fluid back into the top of the MC. That was much easier than doing it in a vice to me anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I found my problem...it was a line running above the MC level...i re-routed it outside the engine bay, along the front frame rails to the passenger side and bled it all again and now I have brakes...maybe not quite stiff enough...but I suspect I may have to bleed the rears one more time(although it does start to make your leg sore after pumping the brakes about 12 times)it was a stupid mistake on my part

p.s. also had to replace my nice stainless steel front lines with regular rubber ones because one of them was leaking...I suspect the problem there was the fittings the banjo bolts go though had too smooth a surface(the rubber lines had grooves in that location...which of course dug into the copper washers for a better seal)
 
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