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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Im looking for a expert news, magazine article on whats involved in restoring a classic car, Whats involved ,total hours it takes , any help would be much appreciated
 

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Do you need it for a paper your writing? If not,you will get much more expert knowledge asking right here.I do it for a living,ask away.Complete resto involves every part,nut and bolt of the car. Hours depends on the condition and type of car. I will put anywhere from 900 to 2500 hours in a car.
 

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Your desired info is way too broad to be answered in an article, or even series of them. Restoring a car to drive is a different animal than restoring for Pebble Beach. Restoring a Mustang is a different animal than a Packard.

Given you are posting on a Mustang site I assume you are looking to do a Mustang. If you tell us more about your intended build perhaps we can point you to some references.
 

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knew someone who restored vettes for a living. He used to estimate 2000 hours for a nut and bolt, top flight restoration to a typical as new condition. I've sure some were fewer hours and some were more. Basically a full time job for a year. Wouldn't expect a Mustang to be significantly more or less.
 

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Fairly general question. I think a start would be to obtain a print or digital copy of some books on restoring classic cars. One half-way decent title is Auto Restoration: From Junker to Jewel by Burt Mills. This will give you a general idea of the work involved. The time frame and cost is relatively specific to the type of car being restored. For instance, a fairly common car like a Mustang can be considered a fairly "easy" restoration, while something like a Fairlane Skyliner retractable hardtop would be significantly harder (and more expensive).
 

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the entire reason I took on a full restoration was because of all these answers. it is a challenge and you'll never ever be prepared for it. you just gotta do it. I'm not some rich guy with tons of time and money and most of the people here aren't. Sometimes a little passion and hard work can go a long way.
 

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You can figure out with a little research what you think it should take time wise and cost wise Using readily available parts costs and labor rates. Take those figures and triple them.........too many factors. Dropping the car off somewhere? Doing it yourself? A mix? Also depends on the make and model of car.
 

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My snarky answer to the OP is: "If you have to ask how much it cost, you can't afford it". There are vintage Mustangs that have been resurrected from decades of neglect and abuse and the cost can be measured in cubic dollars.

The problem is that the word "restoration" has no single universally accepted meaning. Generally it refers to a process which has at its core, a target level of quality. While the word is imprecise when describing the process of bringing a car back from the brink, most will agree that time and money are the two basic "ingredients", lots of both if the goal is to build an MCA Gold trailer queen level car.
Look at the depth of deconstruction and fabrication of the project Rusty Gillis tackled and the word "heroic" comes to mind.
 

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I feel the OPs pain to not getting an answer to his question here. But no, I can't think of an "expert news, magazine article" that would cover it. Perhaps he wants on he can cite as reference but it would take a book and even the short version would be long and boring.:p
 

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I would recommend exploring the "build thread" on this forum. This will help give you the right perspective. Every car and restoration requires a different level of work and repair. These cars are well over fifty years old. Some cars have rust, some have been in accidents, some have been already partially modified, and everyone has a different budget and method to repair. There are so many variables and levels of detail involved in a restoration, but the "build thread" will help you see what hobbyists and professionals go through. The thread will definitely make you realize, "I didn't think of that." kind of stuff. Also, there is no single correct method to a restoration.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I need it for evidence in a court case, There is so much mis-information online and with all the reality shows out there making it look like you can restore a car for $15000-20000 instead of the real world where a high end restoration shop 1000-2500 hours (not a back yard shop) , Most restorations shop deal with this as no matter how hard you try to educate the customer before the restoration things can go sour as the restoration go on and new issues arise, any help would be much appreciated
 

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I don't have any specific recommendations and this is an extremely broad topic that is subjective to the specific vehicle being restored, but you might want to try the Hemmings archives, which appear to be free to peruse. You also could lean on some of the "how to restore" books that are available on Amazon. Without knowing the specifics of what you are trying to accomplish, you've probably gotten all the info anyone would be able to give. Since it's for a court case, it might be better to bring in an expert witness that is an accomplished and well known restorer.


.... and the index to all of the articles....

 
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