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Discussion Starter #1
Well I just found two big areas that have about a square foot of lead covering the steel. I’m really not sure how to deal with it. Do I cut the entire piece out or just grind off all the lead? I could just leave it but frankly I want it steel there not a 1/4 inch of lead.
 

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I would DEFINITELY NOT grind it if all possible. I think the preferred way is to heat it and remove. You may need to grind and wire wheel the last remnants, in which case where a mask.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I would DEFINITELY NOT grind it if all possible. I think the preferred way is to heat it and remove. You may need to grind and wire wheel the last remnants, in which case where a mask.
That makes sense as a traditional grinding wheel would wreck any good metal underneath. By melting I could possibly save some of the good stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Alright new question, I’ll post it here and if no response I’ll do a new thread.

Got through the lead on one section and I see a seem. It’s a lap seem. The lead was filling it in. Makes sense. But now I’m like how do I get rid of the lap seem properly? Is it a cut and patch thing?
 

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Leave it there if you can but if you need to remove it then get the torch out and melt it off the car. Lead was used at the factories on most cars at the B-pillar to roof up until the late 80s. My 84 El Camino had a nice perfectly done lead job at the sail panel to roof. They really did a good job on the lead back then especially considering how fast they had to do it.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Leave it there if you can but if you need to remove it then get the torch out and melt it off the car. Lead was used at the factories on most cars at the B-pillar to roof up until the late 80s. My 84 El Camino had a nice perfectly done lead job at the sail panel to roof. They really did a good job on the lead back then especially considering how fast they had to do it.
Ok so I basically just removed a bunch of factory led for no reason?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
If you need to weld in patch panels then you need to remove it because the welding will melt it otherwise don't mess with it.
Ok I will not be re melting back all the lead I took off. Sometimes it pays to be patient. I jumped on it to quick haha
 

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The exception would be areas like on the 65-66 where they did the joints backwards to how everyone else did them (typical ford doing it the hard way). The sail panel is usually part of the fender on most cars so the lead is at the roof line. Well on the 65-66 the sail panel was part of the roof so the joint was at the 1/4. Those are well known for cracking and best to remove the lead weld the panels together and use a modern filler.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
The exception would be areas like on the 65-66 where they did the joints backwards to how everyone else did them (typical ford doing it the hard way). The sail panel is usually part of the fender on most cars so the lead is at the roof line. Well on the 65-66 the sail panel was part of the roof so the joint was at the 1/4. Those are well known for cracking and best to remove the lead weld the panels together and use a modern filler.
Thank you, I guess I’m learning how to body solder.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Would there be any problem if I were to cut out the factory lap seem and weld in a butt patch instead? It would make the lead obsolete.
 

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Well since you have realized it belongs there,the proper thing to do is put it back.
 

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Yes, it pays to be patient, ask questions and read. There are plenty of people here who are more knowledgeable than I and hopefully they will chime in.

Lead dust is dangerous, so you don’t want to grind it. I think most would leave it there if it is in sound condition.

Now that you need to address it, I believe this is the proper product.

There is also a lead-free solder that is probably a whole new learning curve.

Again, I am just a newbie too and hopefully one of the resident experts will chime in. Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Well since you have realized it belongs there,the proper thing to do is put it back.
Yes I’m prepared to do just that. But I dont see any issue with making the lead obsolete by removing the lap weld. There very well could be. That’s what I’m asking
 

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The one issue I can see with removing the original lap joint is that should you, someday in the future due to accident, etc., need to replace either the roof panel or quarter panel then you're going to be in for a lot of additional work to fab it all together versus some spot or rosette welding and some Evercoat 889...
 

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Discussion Starter #17
The one issue I can see with removing the original lap joint is that should you, someday in the future due to accident, etc., need to replace either the roof panel or quarter panel then you're going to be in for a lot of additional work to fab it all together versus some spot or rosette welding and some Evercoat 889...
Oh I see. Well since the lead is still on most of the areas I will simply clean and re tin the areas that I removed it and re apply the same lead. That way it’s the same throughout. Anyway lead obviously works and lasts because it’s been on this car for 49 years
 

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Where you have it, it's not that difficult. I did it on my 69 Mach1 that had full quarters replaced and it came out pretty well. I used Eastwood's lead free body solder kit.

I did watch a bunch of videos.

What I started with:
IMG_20150906_210125.jpg


What I ended with:
IMG_20150915_232818.jpg
 
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