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I am installing a '96 Hydroboost unit on our '68 Fastback. The Hydroboost is sitting level to the ground as is the Master Cylinder. However, the plastic reservoir is tapered. So the fill cap is at an angle and really looks bad. Does anyone know of a replacement reservoir that is not tapered front to rear? Or a M/C replacement with the level plastic reservoir? The M/C is off of a '96 Mustang Cobra.

Thanks
 

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Not sure but a master cylinder off a 84-86 Mustang SVO may work for you. It has a 1 1/8" bore and is set up for 4 wheel disc brakes.It is an aluminum bodied master cylinder. I just installed one on my 69 and it cost $42.74 for a rebuilt one and that included a $15 core charge.
 

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For that matter, a 1985 Lincoln Continental uses the SVO MC but with Hydroboost, so that may be a better choice....I know diddly-squat about Ford's Hydroboost setups though.
HTH
--Kyle
 

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The MC was the same, but the MkVII used an adapter plate that allows it to bolt to the Hydroboost. That is, i have such an MC and adapter, that has the same diagonal bolt pattern that earlier Versailles MC's had and they had Hydroboost too.

I'm not sure what (front) calipers you are going to use, but those 1.125" diameter SVO/MkVII MC's were intended for use with large 73mm calipers. Those calipers have a surface area that is almost 50% larger than the stock 68 calipers for example (2.35"/60 mm diameter). For calipers with smaller pistons, a 1" master would work a lot better.
 

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IF I remember correctly a v-6 mc on 99 up have a level plastic resivoir. I'm not sure of the bore though. Hope this helps.
 

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Can you clarify/quantify what you mean by:

1" master would work a lot better
Why would the larger diameter piston in the SVO master cylinder NOT be good for the early Mustang disk brake setups?

It seems you would need less pedal travel to engage the brakes, at the expense of slightly more pedal pressure. You would also gain a lightweight, inexpensive aluminum master cylinder as well (about 40 bucks NAPA).

This subject is of keen interest to me as I am in the process of changing my braking system to 4 wheel disk as well. Perhaps someone with some real world application feedback could help??
 

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You are correct that the MkVII requires less pedal travel, but at the price of 26% more pedal force. That's a noticable difference. Sure, you probably can get the car to stop, but you might as well pick an MC that gives you a nicer pedal feel. After all, factories don't use the biggest MC possible either, but seize them after the rest of the braking system, with the aim to achieve a good balance between effort and stroke and a natural feel.

Ford Racing sells a 1" MC that is otherwise largely identical to the SVO MC (aluminum, old style), and cheap too ($35 I think). It's just a production MC from an 80's Crown Victoria or something.

That being said, I'm going to install an SVO MC soon, but in combination with Lincoln 4 (large) piston calipers.
 
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