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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,

I could use some advice on how to tackle my floor replacement. My car is a 1967 Coupe. I am in the midst of replacing the full passenger and driver side floors, leaving the trans tunnel in place. So, I have the passenger and driver side floors, toe boards, and rear seat extensions. I am also replacing the seat risers, floor supports and front torque boxes. Additionally, I'm going to use this time to install a pair of Global West subframe connectors. At the moment I have the passenger side floor cutout entirely. I figured I would try (learn) on that that side before going to the drive side. The other wild card here is the state of my cowls. Both have the plastic inserts repair done from a previous life. Passenger side looks better than the drivers. I think the passenger side is mostly superficial rust (although I haven't removed the plastic insert) but the drivers is pretty rotted and even with the repair lets alot of water in.

So first question, should I be addressing my cowls while the floors are out first?

Second question, what order should I tackle the floor area? I was sort of thinking:

1. Floor supports
2. Toe boards, pans, and rear floor extensions
3. Seat risers
4. Torque boxes
5. Subframe connectors

Would it be better to do the sub frame connectors right after the floor supports?

Thank you
Emile
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks, I think that might be a good idea. That will help with some self motivation and accountability I think! In the meantime, here are some pictures of the state of affairs.
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Agreed ^^^^^^
Don’t cut anything out until you brace it and get some sort of fixturing in place to make sure you can retain dimensional integrity. There are some clever examples of low cost wood methods to fixture the shell on the forum. If it’s not braced and on something where you can have a repeatable baseline you may never get the unibody straight.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks guys. Right now the only thing that is removed from the car is the passenger floor. I have the rear braced with a jig I built (not that would do much for the front) but I didn’t think the floors would really do much for keeping the body straight if the trans tunnel were left in place. I did weld a temporary cross brace between the front frame rails before I cut out the passenger floor. Not sure if that’s doing a lot. If I were to tackle the cowls a this point I would definitely be bracing the car but I’m not sure it’s needed at this phase beyond what I’ve done? Is tackling the cowl easier with the floors out? Should that be the first thing I replace?
 

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68 Mustang Coupe
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The cowls have almost nothing to do with the floor, as thats a repair made top side. Finish what you've started or you'll have a real mess on your hands. While you're in this deep go ahead and add the passenger side torque box, ford thought it was worth it to do it in 68. The trans tunnel doesn't have much strength in it so don't depend on it. I built a simple jig out of 2x3 steel tubing, replaced my torque boxes, added convertible inner rockers, then welded in my tin man subframe connectors. Even without the complete floor my car is very ridged.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Great, that really helps set me straight! I plan on doing the passenger torque box too. Out of curiosity where did you tie your jig to the car?
 

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68 Mustang Coupe
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At the front under the radiator support, under the floor supports, at the front and rear leaf spring mounts. I used a couple cheap scissor jacks from menards to lift the car in the low spots. I also ran cross supports under the outer rockers panels since I cut out the complete floor.
 
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