Vintage Mustang Forums banner
  • Hey everyone! Enter your ride HERE to be a part MAY's Ride of the Month Challenge!

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,457 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Finally got around to removing the rear window from the 69 coupe pictured below. Its leaked for decades but the car has been stored inside and rarely gets wet. Cleaning it up I uncovered the hole (picture attached). Correct thing to do would be weld it up however, my skills are horrible. I don't want to peal back the 50 year old headliner, don't want to set it on fire and don't want to turn a small hole into a blown out mess screwing with the welder. The hole is no larger than a dime in length.


I figure this will be underneath the bedding compound. Maybe good enough is good enough.


I'm considering cleaning up the lose scale. I'll address the trunk side as well. Filling it with one of the two part epoxy putty products. Feather it out to be about a quarter size patch. Top coat it with Rustoleum or the like.


Anyone have a better suggestion?


There are bunch of those 2 part epoxy putty products. Has anyone used them and have a recommendation/caution regarding any of them?
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,493 Posts
Ok, I get your drift! Whatever you choose, remove all of the rust off both sides, A Dremel Tool would most likely be perfect due to its diminutive sized tools. But, be prepared, as you clean and remove rust you may be opening up a larger area too. For the rest of the channel, you might consider a rust converter product.
Two products come to mind JB Weld an POR Patch. I've used both in similar situations and can be machined, that is, ground smooth. You will likely have to use some type of temporary backer. I have used expired credit cards at time for this type repair.
I agree, there is way too much involved to go after it with a MIG or even lead.
Good Luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,091 Posts
I'd say POR putty or maybe AllMetal. I'm considering a similar situation .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,042 Posts
Yeah, I would wire wheel the heck out of the area and fill it with "ALL METAL" filler...you can buy from TP Tools online or other vendors. Sand smooth, prime, paint, then skim coat it with some black sealer.. then install the rear windshield.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,493 Posts
I agree too, "All Metal" is another good product for that area.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,075 Posts
I had a hole similar to that when I removed the rear window on my '65. This was before I discovered this forum and all the other options. I used JB Weld and would put a bit on there, let it dry, put a bit more on there, let it dry, etc. Once I got it all sealed, smoothed it down as best as I could and then primed, painted, etc. Reinstalled the window and it hasn't been a problem since.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,368 Posts
Well this is probably not the answer you are looking for but;


If you just plug that it will continue to rust around the plug and eventually the plug will probably start to leak if not just fall out completely. Most of the epoxy type fillers like metal to metal or short stranded fiberglass want clean, bare, cross hatch sanded metal.



If you keep working that hole until you get back to solid metal it is probably going to be bigger than a dime size is my guess.



I would cut out a patch and tack it in with many small tacks and slowly to keep the heat down and prevent it from warping. Once it is completely tacked and the welds ground smooth then you can go over it with a thin coat of short strand or metal to metal to protect it. To keep spatter off your vinyl areas you can tape down cardboard to cover those. Spatter tends to roll off cardboard without catching it on fire(usually).



This, in fact, is what I am having to do on my car in places. For that rear glass channel where I had an issue, I ordered a new filler panel which I believe is only available for the fastback. I don't know if you can find that piece separately or not. I used it as a partial filler and back glass corner patch to fix some issues with that area.
 
  • Like
Reactions: vegasloki

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,327 Posts
Wire wheel all the rust away...I have used something called Quik Steel that is a 2 part putty, pinch some off, roll it together and shape it to anything you want, it goes through a heat cycle and [email protected] it is HARD. It can be welded, sanded, ground, painted, whatever just like real metal. Works well in places like that. I used some to save an oil pan. I plan to use some to put in a small hole in a corner that was punched or drilled through a floor pan that is otherwise solid. Absolutely worth it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,368 Posts
Wire wheel all the rust away...I have used something called Quik Steel that is a 2 part putty, pinch some off, roll it together and shape it to anything you want, it goes through a heat cycle and [email protected] it is HARD. It can be welded, sanded, ground, painted, whatever just like real metal. Works well in places like that. I used some to save an oil pan. I plan to use some to put in a small hole in a corner that was punched or drilled through a floor pan that is otherwise solid. Absolutely worth it.

I use quiksteel. I think you could actually make bullets out of that stuff.
 
  • Like
Reactions: myfirstcar66

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,911 Posts
I'd be inclined to fashion a plate that could be JB Welded in place from under neath. Then fill with JB so when the metal expands and contracts its well bonded together. Remember it has to take expansion/contraction from 130+ degrees to -15 or less, I would have at least an inch of overlap with good clean and roughed up metal on either side. That means getting under neath and cleaning very well. Clamp in place. In any case, use toxic waste to kill all rust. Epoxy prime...


Trying to blob fill feels wrong and is going to look very bad from the bottom and a next buyer could be very disappointed when its discovered. A plate done right could be disappeared...


Good luck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,457 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Appreciate the input. The hole was about the size of the head of a pin before a started poking at it. I'll take the dremel to it and see where it ends up. Hopefully not much bigger. I think it may just get plugged with the putty for now. The quality $350 paint job from '87 is beginning to show it's age. Next time it's painted, I'll make it right.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
as for putty. look for something green short strand fiberglass(ask your paint shop). it will say water proof. steel is always better. get a cheap flux core wire welder run it on min 1 and run it for a 3 count if that burns through run a 2 or 1 count. It takes paitence but steel will look better and hold up long term. cut patches dont hang grapes.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top