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This is very unfortunate. I am afraid without a VIN and without a title you are not going to be able to register this car. My guess is it was either a parts car or a stolen car. You could contact the original seller and tell him you need documentation with the vin that shows he owned it and it was his to sell. If he does not have that info then you could ask for your money back, which he is likely to hang up on you. At this point you could try the DMV and when they tell you it can't be registered you could report it to the Police or Highway Patrol as a possible stolen car or keep it as a parts donor car for another one that you can find to build. Although not necessarily legal or legitimate and I am not condoning this, people have put legitimate VIN panels from one car to another and no one can really prove it was done.
 

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I'm very sorry @WDSLOAN25. This is going to suck.

If there's no VIN on the inner fenders, then you have a legal mess on your hands. Please don't put any more money into this project until you have a plan to handle the VIN issue.

First, I would contact a lawyer in your State for advice. Finding a legal expert in this rather obscure area may be the hardest part of your project.

I don't know if it's worthwhile to contact the seller to get a refund. A lawyer can tell you if the seller has legal liabilities selling a car lacking VINs without declaring that fact. It depends on State law and what obligations the seller had to tell you the car had no VINs. I doubt that pleading ignorance regarding the door tag would help the seller much. The amount you paid for the car may be a bigger factor. He may argue that for $5K or whatever price and no title offered you clearly knew the car was sold as "salvage".

I suspect the easiest route is reselling the car quickly as a "salvage vehicle" while declaring that fact to the buyer. Again, a lawyer can advise you on this. Trust me, buyers will call you to buy that car as salvage. State-assigned VINs may be a huge pain in your State, but in other States like mine it's not hard to do.

If you want to restore and drive the car (and I would!), a legal expert can tell you the best way to protect your investment and get her back on the road in your State.

Eventually, you must contact the State and get a State issued VIN. In most States, the process is basically handled the same as building a "kit" car. You build the vehicle, the DMV inspects it for safety standards, you pay fees for an owner-built vehicle, the DMV puts VIN tags/stickers on the main body, and then you can finally register and drive the car. Just find out the whole process and cost before you commit.

A State-assigned VIN code won't follow Ford's 1960s "format" and will use permanent stickers and/or metal tags attached to the main chassis of the vehicle. I've seen them placed on firewalls, inner fenders, dashes near the windshield, and door openings. For obvious reasons, VINs are never placed on removable parts like doors, hoods, or trunk lids.

I strongly advise against highly illegal "restoration techniques" like buying a junk 67 rust bucket and welding those VINs into your car. Sure it's easy, but the risk/reward ratio is pretty darn terrible. Unless you don't mind spending a decade in Federal prison.

Another consideration to "doing it right" is market value. I always flee from Mustangs with sketchy looking VIN stamps. It's fairly common to see fastbacks with coupe body codes. Somehow, there's more and more of these "factory mis-stamps" every year! But the vast majority of legitimate cars have VINs that agree with the physical car. I always maintain that a well-restored, honest car with State-issued VINs has higher market value than a possible fraud. Protect yourself and your investment and do it right.
 

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ok, to me it looks like he welded a piece over top of the apron. I still see the original apron bent over edge under the strip of metal that was welded on it... I bet you could take a cut off wheel and start carefully removing the added top layer, then viola!! The vin will be there and it will match the title!!! Now, did he say the 65/66 fastback could be bought????? Or is he gonna restore it one day...yeah right...
 

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I bet you could take a cut off wheel and start carefully removing the added top layer, then viola!!
Duh! I totally overlooked the welded top-piece appears to cover the entire driver side inner fender! Take the whole thing off. You may have exposed the wrong spot for the VIN stamp. The "visible" stamp is forward of the shock tower on the driver's side. On my 68, the passenger side VIN stamp is also forward of the shock tower. The locations often vary by factory and not all cars got all three stamps. My 68 only got two stamps, but it also has a dash tag which is the "legal" VIN for all 68 and later cars.

I'll keep my finger crossed that Geicoman58 is correct and you'll find at least one good stamp under that metal. But the fact the metal is there is troubling.
 

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Also ask previous owner if he has a copy of his old car insurance papers, that too should have a VIN he used. Good or not
 

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To put this into perspective, I recall a local newspaper article several years ago involving an immaculate '57 Thunderbird that turned out have been stolen 30 or 40 years ago, and sold to an "innocent" buyer. Considerable money was spent restoring the car. The car was being exported when Customs discovered the car was a long ago stolen car that was never recovered. Turns out the car was impounded and the guy apparently avoided jail but lost all his money when the car was returned to its rightful owner, who, if I recall correctly, was a then retired police officer.
As for your car, while I can only speculate on what led to the factory VIN stampings being obliterated, it does not take a stretch to suggest that your car was most likely stolen by someone with terrible welding skills and never recovered.
 

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Here's the other side of the coin..if there are no VIN's on the car, no one else can claim/prove it's theirs.

Remove the top layer of metal and see what's there. You may also be able to see the VIN from underneath the fender.
 
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