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Discussion Starter #1
Why are these so expensive? The price is worth it for what it does, but I don't see how the hardware is worth that much.

Are their upper ball joints unique in some way? Would I have to use them? I ask because I will probably purchases a PST POLYGRAPHITE® Super Front End Kit, and Id rather use their ball joints and bushings.

Could I not just fab up my own negative wedge with a template?
 

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There are two ways to lower the upper A arm. The first is how Ford told Shelby how to d o it, lower the holes down 1" and back 1/8". The common 1" drop that's know as the Shelby drop, is as low as you can go without putting the balljoint into a bind.

The ideal amount to lower the upper A arm is 1 3/4" IIRC, but at this point the ball joint is put into a bind. Therefore either you must modify the upper A arm by bending the end where the balljoint goes by about 15 degrees. Now, I don't know about you, but I don't have a press or an accurate way of measuring this in my garage. Therefore, there are "kits" that have a cast spacer to re-angle the balljoint to keep everything happy. If you can make your own, safe kit, you can sell it too for that money.

The 1" drop is FREE and you can do it at home. The 1 3/4" drop are for the experience, road race pros and there is more to this that has some draw backs, such as bumpsteer. And if you're at this level of driving that you need the 1 3/4" drop, the stock A arms aren't up to the job unless they have been reinforced. By the time you spend the money on the kit and re-inforce the arms, you'd be better off buying tubeular Aa arms.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Good read... thanks.

What are you saying though? That the Shelby drop would be better suited for a street machine, and the Negative Wedge Kit shouldn't be used w/o the bump steer kit?

What about wheels like Vintage 45s that claim to require the negative wedge kit? Will the Shelby drop suffice?
 

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For the average Joe, I think the Shelby drop would be better. Not as radical drop, and most importantly, IT'S FREE!

From talking with several roadracers, either one will make a modest difference on the street. You really won't notice the difference between the two on the street is what I gather from these guys. I looked into this, I'm going with the 1" drop.

I know Dinosawnj, he lives very close to me and he roadraces ( you should see his car!). His car is very functional, if it doesn't work, or not needed, it's not in there. Bob only has a 1" drop. And his car is basically a race car with limited street use.

It's best to talk to these guys first hand, such as Dinosawnj, Art, opentracker, shaun, billgear or roadracer.

I've heard that about the 45's, I can't really coment if you must use a wedge kit or if the Shelby drop will work. You should post that question on the forum in relation to the wedge kit and tha 45's. There must be someone using the 45's.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for you input.

How do you perform a Shelby drop? I figured it was something you bought and installed like a negative wedge kit.

Are there any articles on this somewhere?
 

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No, it's merely drilling new holes! Basically, the 2 bolt holes for the upper arms are lowered 1" and back 1/8" toward the firewall. A few members have this diagram that you can print from their site, but I can't remember who. Also Tony Branda's catalog has the diagram too.

Of course you'll need new alignment specs too. Generally the ones I've seen are 2+ caster, 0 camber and 1/8" toe in. Some people like more caster, some less. The more caster you have, the more stable at high speeds, but hardere steering at low speeds. And visa versa for less caster. But really, how fast are you going to go?
 

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Negative wedge kit is great for the track... Allows full rubber contact with the front tires, no "roll under". Drops the front end 11/2"-2". Not needed for the street... Not a "seat of the pants" improvement in handling.
 

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I don't know if I'd go with PST if I was you. I bought their super front end kit 6 years ago, mostly because at the time they stated it had a 10 year warranty. When I installed all the parts and took my car to the alignment shop, the alignment tech asked me where the parts came from. He could not believe they were new because the front end was so loose. He could just barely get it aligned, but he warned me that there was play in the ball joints and the alignment wouldn't last too long. I should have tore down the whole front end again and sent them back, but I was my only car at the time and I needed it.

Now my ball joints are totally shot. They pop and click and move around a bunch. I can't even get close to keeping an alignment. I called PST asking about their 10 year warranty. They said it is for manufacturers defects only, not wear. He said I should have sent them back within the first 6 months or so and I could've gotten them replaced, but he said it's a slim chance they would replace them now.

The ball joints say "Made in India" on them.

My brother in law and I rebuilt our mustang's front ends at the same time. I used the PST kit and he bought all MOOG parts. He probably paid double for his parts, but his car drove about 1000% better than mine did after it was all done and aligned and it is still driving perfectly. His car drove like a mercedes compared to my car. I could not believe the difference.

Maybe I got a bad kit from PST, or they are all like that, I don't know. But I just wanted to give you my opinion.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Very interesting... thanks for the heads up.

Id like to belive you got a bad kit, but who knows. I know a guy with the same kit. I will ask him his experience with PST, but now I'm thinking I will just have to save up for the Global West control arms.
 

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The only time wheel geometry is of concern is during a turn. Then you have body roll. So, no roll = no change. If you go with good antisway bars (Stambars are the best because they are adjustable) front and rear, you can dial most of that body roll out. And antisway bars are easier to install. I have a negative wedge camber kit in my pile of "waiting" parts and will install it when I do the front end, but have noticed a huge improvement with the good bars. Oh, and I also use KYB gas shocks. I love the coast roads and therefore hit the twisties a lot! When I do the front end I'll also install some variable rate front coil springs which are also on the same pile of parts :))
 

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Three years ago I installed a Negative Wedge Kit, Eibach progressive rate springs, Stam adjustable rate front sway bar, all new Moog parts, whatever extra firm "plastic" bushings they sold me, and 4 1/2 leaf reverse eye rear springs; the car handles great, wears tires evenly, and required only the inital alignment.
 
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