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Discussion Starter #1
I have always loved Mustangs and have begun a serious search for a 1967 or earlier fastback for restoration. I want to do a full restore with some minor performance modifications. Problem I have is I can't seem to get comfortable with what these cars are worth. Matching #'s and rare collector's issues are'nt important to me because I will be doing somewhat of a modified restoration. Can anyone give me some advice on becoming more informed about buying a project car.
 

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Do your self a favor, and THINK about filling in your profile, these guys like to know where your from, your likes, etc., and have fun here, it's a blast, and you can learn stuff too.

Ponies.
 

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Unfortunately, you are getting into an interest in 67 fastbacks at a time when that body style is being sold at a premium. Shelby America/Carrol Shelby is doing a re-issue of the 67-68 GT350/500, based on the "Elanor" of the most recent Gone in 60 Seconds movie. They are selling the reissued cars for upwards of $60,000. Hence, they are buying 67 and 68 fastbacks for the body shell and VIN. This is bidding up the price and making them scarce. Probably easier to find a 66 fastback.

In terms of finding a car, I suggest you search here under the general topic of, how do I pick out a mustang to buy, or what to look for when buying a classic mustang. Personlly, I would not purchase off ebay cause prices are too high and there have been numerous scams on that auction site, based on photos of classic mustangs "for sale".

Also, it would help if you filled out your profile, at least to the extent of listing your location. Someone near you might know of a car for sale. I will be selling 3 fastbacks over the next 9 months - a 65, 69 and 70. However, they will be pretty much restored already.

What price range are you looking for? I would guess you could not pick up a driveable 67 fastback in even basket case condition for less than $6,000.

good luck.
 
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I'll try to be of some help.

-Matching numbers is a misnomer for Ford products (versus Chevy). Ford did not stamp parts with the VIN like other manufacturers so matching number is basically checking on build dates and hopefully they would be close.
-pre'67 Fords do not have a paper history. I can't remember why at the moment but MartiAutoWorks does have production data after 67, though some have now questioned their correctness.
-The cowl vents on Mustangs were not painted during production therefore water over the years has rusted the area and most likely caused interior leaking which in turn rusted out many a floor pan.
-torque boxes on these unibody cars were also prone to rust
-if purchasing a I6 Mustang and planning on converting to a V8 realize that the entire front suspension needs to be change. I6 suspension was not strong enough to accomodate a V8. Also driveline components should be replaced (rear/axle). Note 4 lug versus 5 lug wheels.
-Due to numbers that were made 69 and newer will have a premium cost based on available parts used to refurbish.
-Front suspension can be modded to Mustang II.
-late model 5.0 engines are also a favorite mod.
-interior correct pieces can cost more than engine parts for rebuilds
-prices of Mustangs can vary from 3k to greater than 30k.
Buying a rustang and restoring it is a nobel enterprise but sometimes considering the cost it might be better to pay up front for a better carcass.
Suggest since you plan on a rebuild (engine,driveline, suspension) that you base your hunt to a solid and straight body.

I'm sure more will chime in with other suggestions.
 

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I have one word for you research. There are many things you need to investigate before investing in a classic Mustang. Some of the issues have already been pointed out and others you will discover through study. The points about rust, matching numbers, and starting with a V8 car have already been made.
But the 67 and 68 bodies are very similar. Why limit yourself to 67 and older?
I suggest you visit the KAR mustang web page, http://www.karmustang.com/default.html, for ideas about buying a mustang and what these cars are worth. Hope this helps.
 

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Stay away form classic auto dealers they will rip you off. I just purchased a 67 fastback with minor surface rust in two areas for $10,000. Saw one at a dealer with body and interior in worse condition. Same engine and trans and features. Selling for $18,000. like everyone said do the research and be patient. I spent a year before I found one that I wanted.
 

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Good advice here.
Unfortunately, experience is the best teacher... ::
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Ok, I have edited my profile. I was hoping to find a restoreable fastback in the $7500 neighborhood. Right now I am trying to gain enough info that I will feel comfortable making a purchase when I do find the right car. I don't want a rust bucket and will pay what it takes to get the car I want, I just don't know enough at this point to evaluate the worth of any Mustangs. Is $7500 in the ballpark for a solid restoreable body with a buildable engine?
 

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From my recent experience. It will be very hard to find a Fastback that is solid for that price. You may be able to find a decent coupe for that price. or a fastback that needs quite a bit of work. Look at autotrader and also look at ebay but don't bid on anything that you can't look at. If you find something on ebay, post it on this site people here will give their opinion on what is listed.
 

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Oh Boy, where do I begin? I just went through the process that you are just starting. I ended up buying a 65 FB locally. I searched coast to coast, on ebay and autotrader and collectorcartradoneronline, and almost made fatal mistakes on several occasions. My advice is to search these resources, but do not buy anything that you cannot inspect, drive, touch, feel, think about over the weekend, for yourself. Here in the midwest, I think that 7K is too low to purchase a decent starter car. I would think that prices in your area may be even higher. Best of luck, do not give in to the temptation to buy just any ole fastback, and follow along and contribute to VMF. It will all come together for you. Marshall in Madison
 

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My favorite car is the 67 fastback. I started my search 4 years ago, and couldn't find anything in SoCal that I was comfortable with. So, I settled with a 68 coupe. Like everyone has told you, it will be hard to find one with a good body for a fair price.

Whatever car you end up buying, be prepared to do some pannel replacements unless it was recently restored. If the seller will let you do this, I'd recommend bringing a bottle of water with you. Pour it down the cowl vent and see if it drains into the floors. If it does, you will have to do a cowl replacement, and floors as well. Floors are easy (in my opinion) compared to the cowl. Then, you have to think about the torq boxes. Finally, if you are allowed to, pull up the carpet and see what is underneath. That is the only way to really know what you are buying. I wish I would have done that...I would have found rust that wasn't visible from the underside and thus would have had one more weapon in negotiating the price. I paid too much thinking the floor were in much better shape than they were.

Good luck on your search, but be patient and don't let a seller pressure you.
 

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Stick around the VMF for a while, You will learn a bunch ::
 
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