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Discussion Starter #1
I finally decided to seize the moment and build a 331 for my 65. The current configuration is a 289, Twisted Wedge 170 heads, XE262 Comp Cam, flat top forged pistons, Blue Thunder dual quad intake port matched, a pair of Quick Fuel 425 carburetors, Pertronix II distributor, TopLoader close ratio transmission, 3.55 TractionLock 8" rear. My plan is to go with a roller 5.0 block, 331 stroker kit with Twisted Wedge compatible pistons, a different cam.

So I did a little searching online and found a complete 5.0L out of a 98 Explorer with stock bores. Don't know the mileage, but I'll get it figured out. I tried to find one locally, but the few times I've been to the Pick 'n Pull, Pull-A-Part, etc in Tucson, the 5.0's are either gone or missing all the major components with the block left open to the elements for who knows how long.

This is going to be a fall/winter project as time and funds permit. Right now the plan is to get it mounted on an engine stand and start tearing it apart. I figure I can sell the heads for a decent price to recoup some of the cost of the complete engine. The way the heads keep disappearing from the junk yard engines, there seems to be a pretty good demand for them.

So this is what arrived today:

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1965 2+2 Vintage Burgundy A-code C4
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That looks eerily familiar... will be following.
765498
 

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Discussion Starter #3
One issue I've run into already is trying to get that heat shield off at the rear of the exhaust manifold on the passenger side. It's held on with 3 small bolts that are smaller than a 5/16" but bigger than a 1/4" wrench. They are on there pretty tight...probably from the rust they've collected. I got all the other exhaust manifold bolts off (one broke), but I can't get to the one behind that heat shield.
 

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Be careful when removing the lower intake manifold. The last bolts (closest to the firewall) have a tendency to break off flush with the head surface when loosened.
I am going to build a 333 (4.040 bore) for my '65 using my Ford Racing Boss 302 block that is currently a 4.00" bore. I wanted a standard bore block that I can install all of my 302 rotating assembly into and I found a complete 5.0 in a Mountaineer at the P-N-P. All I wanted was the block so I stripped the complete engine down to the bare block. Those 2 lower manifold bolts both broke off. I didn't care because I didn't want the heads anyway. I have read on the internet that it is very common for those 2 bolts to break off. You will have better luck selling the heads if they don't have broken off bolts in them.
 

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One issue I've run into already is trying to get that heat shield off at the rear of the exhaust manifold on the passenger side. It's held on with 3 small bolts that are smaller than a 5/16" but bigger than a 1/4" wrench. They are on there pretty tight...probably from the rust they've collected. I got all the other exhaust manifold bolts off (one broke), but I can't get to the one behind that heat shield.
Nice project for the Winter, and those small bolts might be metric.
 

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If you are building a stroker, why not go all out and go for a 347? You will be leaving some power on the table with the shorter stroke.
 

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If you are building a stroker, why not go all out and go for a 347? You will be leaving some power on the table with the shorter stroke.
To some people the 16 cubes realy are not worth grinding the block and having the pins in the ring lands - less loading on the walls and less tendancy for the pistons to rock/slap - same bore size either way so no benefit on unshrouding larger valves either - I'm putting together a 306 right now - I considered a stroker and if I had gone that way, I would have done the 331 too.
 

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1965 2+2 Vintage Burgundy A-code C4
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Ok, I’m sufficiently nervous now. Since I have the infamous “brand new” 1998 Explorer motor, I’m not sure if that is good or bad for my intake bolts. What is a good way to avoid snapping bolts? Heat, soak for days with penetrant, all the above?
 

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Penetrating oil won't hurt but I'm not sure if it will get down far enough. After snapping mine off, I tapped the bolts with a ball peen hammer. That seemed to loosen things up. Maybe it would have helped before hand. It might just happen. Don't be scared.
 

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Be careful when removing the lower intake manifold. The last bolts (closest to the firewall) have a tendency to break off flush with the head surface when loosened.
I am going to build a 333 (4.040 bore) for my '65 using my Ford Racing Boss 302 block that is currently a 4.00" bore. I wanted a standard bore block that I can install all of my 302 rotating assembly into and I found a complete 5.0 in a Mountaineer at the P-N-P. All I wanted was the block so I stripped the complete engine down to the bare block. Those 2 lower manifold bolts both broke off. I didn't care because I didn't want the heads anyway. I have read on the internet that it is very common for those 2 bolts to break off. You will have better luck selling the heads if they don't have broken off bolts in them.
It was the front bolt on each side that snapped on me.
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To some people the 16 cubes realy are not worth grinding the block and having the pins in the ring lands - less loading on the walls and less tendancy for the pistons to rock/slap - same bore size either way so no benefit on unshrouding larger valves either - I'm putting together a 306 right now - I considered a stroker and if I had gone that way, I would have done the 331 too.
I actually did build a 331, but it had forged internals and H beam rods. The block required grinding for rod clearance. The rods also intersected the bottom ring land. This engine did not have excessive oil consumption and a tear down after about two years of use showed no evidence of piston scuffing or slap. It also had almost no blow by, I had an air oil separator installed and never had any acclimation of oil. That engine dynoed at 372 RWHP, the shop that assembled the engine told me that I would have had about 20 ft/lbs more torque if it was a 347.
Here's the dyno sheet
 

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Like I said....to some people - and good poiint on the ring lands, I was not going to use the longer rod.....I'm not gonna hijack this guys thread any longer....
 

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Sounds like fun. It seems you have a pretty stout 289 as well. Will you get numbers before the new engine build goes in ? I would be interested to see what its number were. I have a fully built 351w in my 64.5, but muling around what to do with it. Since I am not really racing anymore, I am happy with my 289, it not mild, so it has a little umph to it, and so far I am good with it. Need to also get it dynoed.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Day 2 of the project....and I'm sore and tired.

As some of you may know, I don't have a garage, but I do have a couple of 10' x 12' workshops that I built. One is mostly for storage and the other is for tools and working inside. I decided to strip some of the stuff off the 5.0 and then maneuver it in the dirt to the door of the workshop and get it up on an engine stand. Started right after getting home from work, and spent the next 4 hours playing with the dang thing, minus dinner time.

I couldn't get the heat shield off the passenger side exhaust manifold...I don't know what size those bolts were, but nothing SAE or metric that I had would fit snugly onto them. I finally gave up, got out the cutting wheel and cut that shield in half to access the bolt behind it. It was the last one I needed to remove, and then I proceeded to snap it off into the head. So that was 2 out of 16 that broke off. Gotta love it! (y)

Once the exhaust manifolds were off, I moved my engine hoist over to where the engine was on the pallet, and the legs of the hoist wouldn't fit around the pallet so I could get the hoist in position. Some 2 x 4's, muscle, and determination, I lifted the 5.0, got the pallet out of the way, and then watched the hoist sink into the dirt. Would not budge! Put the 5.0 in a tire on the ground, got some plywood, and with some 2 x 4's, muscle, and determination, I got the engine to the door of the work shed where the engine stand was waiting. Put the head of the stand on the engine, got the engine stand in position, and got the whole thing put together. Then the engine stand rolled forward and dropped the front wheels out the door. Aaarrgghhhhh!. Got a floor jack, and with some 2 x 4's, muscle, and determination, got the stand level and pushed it back into the shed. Whoops! Forgot to put a pin/bolt on the stand to prevent the engine from rotating, so of course it rotated upside down and proceeded to dump close to 5 quarts of oil and some coolant all over the wooden floor. I thought these things were not supposed to be shipped with coolant, oil, and fuel still inside? Not true!

I did most of this after the sun set, so I used a fluorescent work light to keep the area illuminated. I felt like I was in the movie, "The Mist", with all the strange creatures flying toward the light and bumping into me. I swear I felt a small bird hit me in the back of the leg at one point. Then we have the scorpions, rattlesnakes, tarantulas, and other assorted creatures that like to sting and bite.

So I'm done for the evening. I was too tired and greasy to take pictures, but I'll get some tomorrow. Now time to break it down to the bare block to see what I've got there and take it to the machinist down the street to tank it and get a real good look at it.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Much better day today, and got quite a bit done in just a couple of hours. Of course, there were some minor roadblocks along the way, but they were overcome.

Here's what the 5.0 looks like on the engine stand after the struggle of getting it inside last night. The dirt on the floor is in process of soaking up probably close to 5 quarts of used oil and coolant that spilled out when the engine turned upside down on the stand. I spent about a 1/2 hour today scraping and cleaning the dirt out today after I got home.

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After I got the floor a bit cleaner than this, it was time to go back to getting the upper intake off. I got the 4 visible bolts off, but I knew that couldn't be all of them, but I couldn't find anymore. I finally went online and found out there are 2 more under the 5.0L plaque on the top of the upper intake, and it's held on by two small female Torx bolts. I don't know about you, but I absolutely HATE Torx anything! What a royal pain in the butt they are. These were T20 in size, and I do have a T20 male Torx bit, so I put it to work. The first bolt came out just fine, but in the process of removing the 2d one, it was really tight. So I went back and forth while trying to remove this one little bolt that's holding up my progress. Finally, the bit breaks off inside the bolt......you gotta be kidding me! Luckily I have a set of left handed drill bits, so I drilled it out, took the plaque off, and then removed the two bolts to get the upper intake off, finally! Once it was out of the way, removed some vacuum hoses, water hoses, wiring, etc, and time to get the lower intake off.

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Taking the lower intake was a piece of cake as it's pretty much the same on all the other 289's and 302's. The only problem I had was getting the thermostat housing off. Of course, the first bolt came right off, but the second one felt like it was ready to snap off if I tried to hard to loosen it. Recalling other folk's problems with bolts and aluminum parts, I figured there was corrosion involve with bolt and intake. Worked it back and forth until it finally got to the point where I could remove the bolt without it breaking. It took longer to get this one out, and found out why. Looks like someone used a hardware store bolt that was about 1/2 inch longer that the other bolt, and it was completely rusted. After that, off came the intake and time to attack the heads.

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A couple of minutes with an impact wrench and an 11/16" socket, and the head was ready to come off. Pulled the head, and the bores and pistons looked a bit used, but fine. I cleaned off the #5 piston, and it appears these are standard bore as there are no markings on the piston to indicate a larger size. The bore in #7 looks good to me too. This is where I left off for the night.

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