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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Maybe some of you have seen this already, but it's new to me. It was a floating rotor set up. I just saw it on TV on a Porsche race car. I think the idea was to make the strongest braking package that would fit inside the 16" wheel required by that particular racing org. It had a caliper that was fix mounted to the spindle, but had pistons only on the inside like a floating caliper. The caliper went full circle around the rotor, with 6 conventional brake pads on each side of the rotor. The really trick part is that the pistons on the inside of the caliper would press the inner 6 pads against the rotor, which would slide on the center hub to press against the fixed pads on the outer side of the caliper, clamping the rotor between all the pads and creating friction on the full 360* sweep of the rotor surface. I believe the rotor was only 12" in diameter but the braking this set up is capable of I'm sure would be well beyond a 13" or 14" rotor with a normal caliper and pad size. Unsprung weight was close to the larger size brake systems due to the large alumimum caliper, but rotational mass was less compared to a 14" rotor. I doubt we'll ever see something this elaborate made for a street driven 'stang, but I thought it was cool just the same. It'd be a sweet set up for making a race quality braking system that would fit inside vintage 15" rims to keep an authentic period look on our cars. :thumbup:
 

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Do you have a link to any information or pictures?

Tim
 

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I'm thinking that it would need to use carbon fiber rotors to withstand the heat generated by having 360 deg contact with no open area for cooling. That in itself would make it impractical for a street car, I would think. Still pretty interesting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I've been searching the web for anything remotely similar to this but so far no luck. Unfortunately the program I saw didn't mention a brand or manufacturer. I'm pretty certain the rotor wasn't carbon fiber. Looked like normal iron rotor material, but it might have been steel, they didn't mention that. There wasn't any cooling issues either, that would've been seriously limiting for a racing brake system. Although the caliper was a 360* circle, it was 2 halves held together by steel pins spaced between the pads, so the only thing to hinder the air flow was 7 round pins around the circumference. The rotor itself, besides riding in lateral grooves on the hub, looked just a little thicker than a normal rotor with large vanes for cooling. I'm sure air flow through the rotor was not an issue.
 

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What you described reminds me of a system that I saw about 10 years ago.
Richard Spenard (a Canadian race car driver) was using it on a Porsche he was driving.
If I recall correctly, the company that developed this was out of Quebec and they originally developed it for Transport trucks.
That's about all that I remember about it.
 

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First thing that came to my mind as well was how do you keep that cool without an exposed section of the rotor?
 

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Red66GTCoupe said:
First thing that came to my mind as well was how do you keep that cool without an exposed section of the rotor?
My thoughts exactly. It's not how much pad you run, it's how well you displace the heat.
 

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That's why I mentioned carbon fiber rotors. Seems like there would be a lot of heat generated and not disapated, so they'd need a rotor that could withstand the heat.
 
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