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Going to put in MAXcore 2 core rad with shroud and 6 blade flex fan and hoses on my 289....is this a diy for a novice? do i need to order a mounting adapter for the fan? Does this sound like a good package? Your help is appreciated..thanks.. Rex
 

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I would avoid the flex fan and go with an OEM-style rigid fan, personally. In terms of the install, it's pretty straightforward. In terms of fan spacer, my experience has been that you'll really need to get everything installed and measure what spacer you'll need, as they vary based on radiator thickness, shroud, water pump, etc.
 

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1966 Fastback, 289 - C4
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It's a very straightforward job. Couple of tips...
Might be a good time to install a new thermostat.
Double check the new rads petcock to ensure it's tight.
If auto trans be mindful not to cross thread the lines in the new rad.
As always with anything, don't tighten the bolts all the way until everything is in place.
 

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Also tape some cardboard on the radiator fins so you don't cut up your hands, and don't flatten the fins out when they inevitably come into contact with the shroud, the fan, the hoses, your hands, etc.

Just remember to take the cardboard off later.
 

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I did this project with a 24" ACP MaxCore in my 70. These are OEM style radiators so stock mounting configurations can be used. If you are replacing it with the same size you shouldn't have any issues, except possibly fan spacing. If you are increasing the size of the radiator as I did, you may need to get different mounting brackets. Mine went from bolting directly to the core support to saddle brackets. Also, the 2 core has 1-1/4" tubes that make this radiator thicker than a 3 core, so you may need to replace your fan spacer. I had to go from 2-1/4" to a 1-1/2" spacer I believe, and it was still tight. A wider radiator can cause clearance issues with the battery. As Magnus says above, cardboard is your friend. Cover the front and back of the radiator with cardboard as you will be putting it in and taking it out about 1000 times before you are done, and the aluminum fins are VERY EASY to bend. There are perfect pieces to use in the radiator packaging. Best of luck with your project.
773501
 

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Thanks for the great tips Guys!
Rex
The Ideal, or, close to it, is to have the fane within an inch of the radiator core. How dod you do this? Once you install the radiator you have a fan blade and a fane spacer that fits between the fan and the water pump pulley. Fan spacers come in a couple different lengths. Purchase one that gets you as close to the ideal as possible. Also, if your car is a C4, you may need need "tubing" wrenches to remove the trans cooler lines at the old Rad for transfer to the new one. I suggest tubing as they grip the nuts better than an open-end (two contact points).
 

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As noted above in 67 they made the radiators in 2 widths. Big block and A/C cars got the wider ones. It is a simple swap for better cooling. But te wider ones use different Mounting brackets top and bottom. Are you us8ng a stock style shroud? When properly mounted the fan blades should be 1/2 in and 1/2 out of the shroud.
 

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1966 GT Fastback, 289, TKO 5-spd, EFI, 4-discs, TCP coilovers
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Going to put in MAXcore 2 core rad with shroud and 6 blade flex fan and hoses on my 289....is this a diy for a novice? do i need to order a mounting adapter for the fan? Does this sound like a good package? Your help is appreciated..thanks.. Rex
I would rate this as one of the easier DIY jobs - bolts, hoses and clamps - that's it. You can do this, dude ...
 

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Easy job. I swapped out a bad radiator for a new radiator in the parking lot at work. I waited longer for the new radiator to be brought from home than I did actually doing the swap. However, this was on a 65 with manual everything and no transmission cooler lines or A/C to mess with.
 

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Like others have said, easy. The worst part is draining the radiator as it can make a huge mess so be ready to catch it. I'll usually leave the plug in place a bit or use my finger to restrict the flow and direct it to the catch pan.
 

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I would rate it a 5 out of 10 if you've never done it before. It's less than a 1 after you've done a few of them.
It's always a long-winded process. You can speed it up some with today's electric tools though.
 
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If everything cooperates it is a easy although somewhat messy job.

Things to keep in mind:

1. If you haven’t replaced the hoses recently. Use new ones
2. Make sure there is a spring in the lower hose. You might need a new one or reuse the old one.
3. Don’t over tighten clamps.
4. Consider flushing the engine before you put in the new radiator.
5. You will probably need to reuse the brass fittings for the Auto trans cooling lines.
6. Be sure to use the proper wrenches for the trans cooling lines to avoid damaging the fittings or lines. regular hex wrenches can damage them.
7. Always use distilled water mixed with the correct amount of antifreeze to fill the system.
 
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I know many like aftermarket fans. On my '67 FE with AC I'm running the factory fan and clutch. 180 degree Stewart EMP Thermostat. The factory shroud bolts to the Maxcore so using all factory components works great. If you elect to use the Clutch fan for your 67 you can use the C6OE-F. That will work with the reproduction shroud. When you order the saddle mounts, order the lowers for a 1968-up. They are different and the lower radiator tank does not work with the OE 67 lower mounts. Don't forget the upper. Be sure to replace hoses while you're at it.
 

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I second the advice to use a clutched fan. Make sure it is a thermal clutch, not a centrifugal clutch. The thermal clutch makes a classical feedback control system that works very well.

I live just a few miles from Woodward Avenue. Every year I enjoy the Woodward Cruise all weekend long (my wife calls it "the High Holy Days of Woodward"), and cruising Woodward many other times throughout the summer. My Mustang with the fixed blade fan will overheat if I don't pay attention and fast idle it. My Mustang with the flex fan easily overheats and I can't do much with a fast idle to manage it. I have to leave Woodward to get some air moving through the radiator. My cars with thermal fan clutches are easy to keep from overheating. The first thing I notice is more fan noise (no, not spectators asking for burnouts) and I can tell the clutch is doing its job. Occasionally I have to fast idle those cars. Since they are automatics I'd rather not have to fast idle them.

Thermal fan clutch is the clear winner. The flex fan car is going to be changed to a thermal clutch setup.
 
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